Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of December 1st, 2016

 

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday December 1st, 2016

Cucumber from Preferred Produce

Butternut Squash from Mesa Top Farm

Sunflower Sprouts from Sungreen Living Foods

Large Bok Choy from Vida Verde

Black Spanish Radishes from Frisco Farm

Salad Mix Tentatively (Cantaloupe is backup) from Sol y Tierra

 

Turkey Hangover?

I am sure I am not alone in having overdone it this past holiday on turkey, stuffing, pie and all other manor of wonderful dishes. As the leftovers get closer to being done, the idea of fresh veggies and heathy dishes starts to become more and more appealing to me. We had a little communication mix up with one of the farms because of the holiday messing with schedules. We had though we were all set for salad mix this week, but it didn’t get reconfirmed as early as the farm wanted, so we are waiting to hear if they will be able to still send it this week. If we don’t get the salad mix, we will have cantaloupes from Preferred Produce as a backup.  Hopefully this week’s share helps us balance out our diets after last week’s festivities.

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, …

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Apples: Fuji and Rome: On the marketplace

Spaghetti Squash: On the marketplace

Butternut Squash: On the marketplace

Grape Tomatoes: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

 

QUINOA “STUFFING” (QUINOA WITH BUTTERNUT SQUASH, CRANBERRIES & PISTACHIOS)

quinoa-stuffing-21

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cubed
  • 1 red onion, peeled and diced
  • 3-5 cloves garlic, with peel still on
  • 1 Tbsp. vegetable or canola oil (or any high-heat oil)
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups quinoa, rinsed
  • 3 cups chicken broth, vegetable broth, or water
  • zest of one orange
  • 2 cups roughly-chopped fresh spinach
  • 2/3 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup shelled pistachios

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.

In a large mixing bowl, toss butternut squash, onion, and garlic cloves (with peel still on) until they are evenly coated with oil. Spread then out in an even layer on the prepared baking sheet. Season generously with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes, or until soft and cooked and the edges begin to slightly brown. Remove and set aside. Discard the garlic peels.

Meanwhile, stir together quinoa, broth (or water), and orange zest, and cook according to package instructions. When cooked, set aside.

Add the cooked veggies, quinoa, spinach, cranberries and pistachios to a large mixing bowl, and gently toss to combine. Season with additional salt and pepper if need be. Serve warm.

 

Sunflower Shoot Salads Ideas

sunflower-shoots

  • Goat cheese + lemon vinaigrette (Blend 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, 1/4 cup lemon juice, 1 tablespoon warm water, the zest of one lemon, salt, and black pepper.)
  • Cannellini beans + creamy vinaigrette (Blend 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil, 3 tablespoons of white wine vinegar, 3 tablespoons of soft tofu, 1 teaspoon of Dijon mustard, 1 chopped shallot, salt, and black pepper.)
  • Avocado vinaigrette: Blend 1/4 cup of lime juice, 1/2 of an avocado, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, salt, and black pepper.
  • Yogurt sauce: Blend 1 cup yogurt, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, salt, and freshly ground black pepper. Thin with olive oil and lemon juice. (Variation – Nutty yogurt sauce: Whisk in up to 1/4 cup of your favorite nut butter to the yogurt mixture. Thin with olive oil, rice vinegar, and honey.)

Black Radish Latkes

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Ingredients

  • 1 pound black Spanish radishes, grated
  • 1/2 pound white potatoes, grated
  •  2 sprigs of green garlic, minced
  • 1 medium white onion, diced
  • 1 teaspoon black cumin, ground
  • 1/4 cup rice flour
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Vegetable oil based spray

Preparation

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl.
  2. Form patties using about 1 cup of the mixture. Space the patties on a well-oiled cookie sheet.
  3. Bake at 375 degrees until they begin to brown, about 8 to 10 minutes. Flip the patties and cook another 8 to 10 minutes.
  4. Serve hot with apple sauce or any other condiment of your choice.

 

Stir-Fried Bok Choy

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INGREDIENTS

  • 12 to 16 ounces bok choy or sturdy greens, like collards, or packaged Southern greens mix
  • ¼ cup chicken broth, vegetable broth or water
  • 1 tablespoon Shao Hsing rice wine or dry sherry
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • ¼ teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon peanut or canola oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, smashed with the flat side of a chef’s knife or minced
  • 1 slice ginger, smashed with the flat side of a chef’s knife or minced
  •  Salt to taste
  • ¼ teaspoon sugar
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons sesame seeds, to taste

PREPARATION

  1. If using bok choy, trim off the bottoms and separate into stalks. Rinse if necessary and drain on paper towels. Cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces. If using collard greens, stem, discard stems and chop the leaves coarsely. Bring an inch of water to a boil in the bottom of a steamer, and place the bok choy or greens in the steamer basket. Steam 1 minute, remove from the heat and rinse with cold water. Squeeze out excess water and drain on a kitchen towel.
  2. Combine the broth or water, rice wine or sherry, soy sauce and cornstarch in a small bowl and place within arm’s reach of your pan. Have the remaining ingredients measured out and near the pan.
  3. Heat a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok or a 12-inch skillet over high heat until a drop of water evaporates within a second or two when added to the pan. Swirl in the oil by adding it to the sides of the pan and swirling the pan, then add the garlic and ginger and stir-fry for 10 seconds, until fragrant. Add the bok choy or greens, sprinkle with salt and the sugar, and stir-fry for about 30 seconds. Stir the cornstarch mixture and swirl into the wok, then stir-fry 1 minute, or until the greens are just tender. Sprinkle on the sesame seeds. Remove from the heat and serve.

 

KALE GROUND BEEF BUTTERNUT SQUASH ONE POT PASTA

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Serves: Serves 3-4

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 tbsp ghee (store-bought or homemade)
  • 500g (1.1lb) lean ground beef (or veal, lamb, pork or turkey)
  • ½ tsp salt (I use Himalayan salt)
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp chili pepper flakes
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 3 cups (400g | 14.1oz) butternut squash, cut into 1″ cubes
  • 3 cup (720ml) warm bone broth (homemade or store-bought)
  • 3 cups (255g | 9oz) dry large shells (or other pasta of your choice)
  • 2 cups packed (80g | 2.8oz) chopped kale leaves (rib removed)

 

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Melt the ghee (or other cooking fat of your choice) in a saute pan set over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the ground beef, salt, pepper, garlic powder and chili pepper flakes and cook, stirring from time to time, until the meat is brown and crispy – about 7 or 8 minutes. Do give that meat ample time to brown and crisp up – that’s the key to getting tons of flavor out of it.
  2. Throw in the chopped onion and continue cooking until slightly softened and fragrant, about 2 minutes, then, add the butternut squash and cook it for about a minute, just to coat it well in all the flavors.
  3. Pour in pour in the broth and bring to the boil, then toss in the dry pasta, bring back to the boil and lower the heat to medium-low; cover and simmer until the pasta is al dente and broth is practically all gone, about 7 to 8 minutes.
  4. Kill the heat, stir in the chopped kale, cover again and allow to rest for 3 to 5 minutes, until the kale is completely wilted.
  5. Serve without delay.

 

Black Radish “Chips” Recipe

radisnoirs-2

Ingredients

  • 2 large black radishes
  • olive oil
  • balsamic vinegar
  • salt, pepper
  • piment d’Espelette (optional, substitute chili flakes)

 

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F). Grease a baking dish (unless it is non-stick).
  • Wash and scrub the radishes. Peel them with a vegetable peeler, leaving half of the peel in stripes if desired.
  • Slice the radishes thinly — very thin slices will be more chip-like, slightly thicker slices will be moister — and put the slices in the baking dish.
  • Pour a little olive oil and a little vinegar, and sprinkle with salt, pepper and piment d’Espelette. Toss to coat. Adjust the amounts so all the slices look comfortably dressed, but not drenched.
  • Put in the oven to bake for about 20 minutes, until the chips are golden and their edges start to crisp up. Serve warm, as an appetizer or a side.

From the Mesa Top: Dec 1, 2016

Climatology 2016:  Once in a while even our amazing weather outdoes itself.  The Monday before Thanksgiving at Mesa Top we had hail and rain followed by thunder and lightning and snow, all in succession in about an hour.  All together the precipitation was nearly an inch.

After a cool down and another warmup we had rain again after Thanksgiving.

Now we are descending into winter.  Temperatures were barely above freezing today and the coldest nights of the year arrive tomorrow and the next day.

From the Wild:  Birds are quiet.  The cold still nights are quiet.  The coyotes howl and so does the wind.

Cow stories:  Abigail had her calf.  Another bandito looking bull calf.  This is the 4th bandito we have had this year.  All are the sons of Clubber, who went became ground beef this summer.  Clubber was himself a son of Ug.  One of the original Jim Miller bulls that came with the ayrshire herd in winter of 2007.  Ug was from the hardy herd of high country ayrshires who adapted to the Lincoln County high plains near Corona.

It would be good to put out the word to Ayrshire breeders or others who would want the well adapted lineage to breed into their herd.  Surely these guys would be great workers.

When we have all of these rascals gathered, we will have to do a line-up photo.

Beneficial birds:  The super insulated brooding area is working beautifully.  We had a major scare with our fueling system:  the new style of safety protected propane tank valves were not allowing us to fill them directly from our 500 gallon tank.  Much trouble shooting led to the realization that the new type of valve required more differential pressure from the big tank: when the big tank was low on fuel, the fuel would not flow out.  Also the new valves have built in backflow preventers, preventing fuel from flowing backward.  Our on farm filing system requires one tank to send and the other to receive which is backwards from the valve design, so the valve also had to be modified to allow back flow.

The fuel consumption of the propane brooder heater is 1 pound per hour.  4.3 pounds make a gallon and a gallon costs $1.65 right now.  This means that our cost per hour is 38 cents and we are spending just over $9 per day for fuel.

We will gradually lower the temperature over the next 3 months.  So we can estimate $600 in fuel to get these pullets ready for the great outdoors.  A brood of hens in spring would cost about a third of that in fuel. Instead of $1 per bird in fuel for brooding, we will have $3 per bird.

A significant increase, which, along with other higher costs may mean that we have to consider a modest price increase, for the first time in several years.

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of November 17th, 2016

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday November 17th, 2016

Green Cabbage from Schwebach Farm

Spinach from Sol y Tierra

Pie Pumpkin from Mesa Top Farm

Carrots from Frisco Farm

Org Red Potatoes from White Mountain Farm

Grape Tomatoes from Preferred Produce

 

Thanksgiving Closure

We will be closed next week, since our CSA would fall on Thanksgiving and most families are working on a large meal plan that might not fit with what the CSA share would be. Since we won’t be distributing food next week, we tried to fit a bunch of local produce into the shares that will work well for the holidays. There will be 3lbs of carrots, and 2.5lb of potatoes in the shares! If members realize they forgot to order something they wanted to the holidays, send us an email Friday/Saturday, and we should be able to get it to you.

Holiday ideas: Cured meats and cheeses, almond brittle, Apples for pies, Rose beef Brisket (email request), we have some 5-6lb chickens if you don’t want to do turkey J

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, …

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Apples: Fuji and Rome: On the marketplace

Spaghetti Squash: On the marketplace

Butternut Squash: On the marketplace

Salad Mix: On the marketplace

Santa Fe Grande Peppers: On the marketplace

Grape Tomatoes: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

 

Parmesan Pumpkin and Spinach Quinoa

Ingredients

  • 1 cup quinoa, uncooked (3 + 1/2 cups cooked quinoa)
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1 tbsp olive oil, extra virgin
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 3 cups chicken stock, low sodium
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 3/4 cup (1.5 oz) Parmesan cheese, shredded
  • 4 handfuls baby spinach leaves

Directions

  1. Cook quinoa as per package instructions and set aside.
  2. In the meanwhile, preheat large deep skillet on low – medium heat and add olive oil. Add onion and garlic, saute until translucent, stirring occasionally. Add pumpkin puree, chicken stock, salt, pepper and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and let the sauce simmer for 5 minutes uncovered.
  3. Stir in Parmesan cheese until melted. Remove from heat and add quinoa and spinach. Stir gently to combine. Adjust thickness with extra chicken stock if desired. I like my quinoa saucy and hot. Because of Parmesan cheese, liquid separation with time is normal. Just give it a good stir. Serve hot.

Cheesy spinach stuffing

Ingredients:

  • 10 ounces frozen spinach ( or fresh)
  • 4 cups herb stuffing mix
  • 1-1/3 cups chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • Liberal dashes salt and pepper
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2/3 -3/4 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 2 tablespoons shredded Parmesan cheese

Directions: 

  1. Defrost spinach according to package directions. Rinse and set aside.
  2. In a large pan, heat butter over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook until starting to soften, about two minutes. Add in garlic and celery and cook until fragrant, about three more minutes.
  3. Add in broth and bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and stir in stuffing mix. Cook until stuffing mix is softened and the broth has been absorbed. Remove from heat and stir in spinach and mozzarella until mixture is fully combined. Garnish with shredded Parmesan and enjoy!

Curried Carrot Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon curry powder

 

  • 2 pounds carrots, chopped
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 cups water, or as needed

Directions

  1. Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Saute onion until tender and translucent. Stir in the curry powder. Add the chopped carrots, and stir until the carrots are coated. Pour in the vegetable broth, and simmer until the carrots are soft, about 20 minutes.
  2. Transfer the carrots and broth to a blender, and puree until smooth. Pour back into the pot, and thin with water to your preferred consistency.

 

VEGAN PUMPKIN BASIL PINWHEELS

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 vegan puff pastry dough*
  • ⅓ cup cooked pumpkin or pumpkin puree
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 400°F/200°C.
  2. Roll out the puff pastry dough.
  3. If you’re using a cooked pumpkin add it into a blender along with the salt and mix until it’s smooth. // If you’re using pumpkin puree, add the salt and give it a good mix.
  4. Spread the salted pumpkin puree on the puff pastry dough, leave out the bottom border.
  5. Sprinkle the basil leaves on top
  6. Roll the puff pastry dough in (as tight as possible) and close the edge.
  7. Cut the puff pastry dough roll in about 25 pieces.
  8. Place the Pumpkin Basil Pinwheels on a baking sheet and place them in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes until golden brown.
  9. Let them cool off a bit and enjoy!

 

Red Potato Slices With Lemon and Olives

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INGREDIENTS

  • 2 pounds medium or large red-skinned potatoes, scrubbed well and cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for greasing the baking dish
  • 1 large lemon, cut into very thin slices (ends and seeds discarded)
  • 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/3 cup pitted oil-cured olives (optional)

DIRECTIONS

Position a rack in the middle of the oven; preheat to 425 degrees. Liberally grease a 9-by-13-inch baking dish or oval gratin dish with olive oil.

Combine the potatoes, oil, lemon slices, garlic, parsley, salt and pepper, tossing well to combine. Spread in the baking dish so that the potatoes lie flat in layers. Roast for about 1 hour; use a heatproof spatula to turn the mixture every 20 minutes, until most of the potatoes are crisp and golden and the lemons are shriveled and slightly caramelized. With 3 to 5 minutes of roasting to go, scatter the olives on top, if using. Serve hot.

 

Roasted garlic & rosemary pumpkin hummus

INGREDIENTS

  • 1-2 cloves roasted garlic
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • ⅔ cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey
  • ½ teaspoon finely minced fresh rosemary (more to taste)
  • salt to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. To roast the garlic, I like to simmer the peeled cloves in a small saucepan with olive oil for 15-20 minutes over low/medium heat. The garlic gets the roast-y flavor and then you get some bonus garlic infused olive oil out of the deal. Bam.
  2. Puree all ingredients except rosemary in a blender or food processor until smooth. Add more oil or water as needed. Stir in the rosemary (I found that the blender didn’t really like the tough rosemary pieces in there so I just stirred it in at the end).
  3. Serve with warm naan, apple slices, crackers, carrots, wheat toast, roasted vegetables, pita bread, and/or anything in the world.

 

Sautéed Collards and Cabbage with Gremolata

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INGREDIENTS

  • 3/4 cup finely chopped parsley
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons minced garlic plus 2 thinly sliced garlic cloves
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest plus 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Black pepper
  • 4 shallots, halved and thinly sliced (3/4 cup)
  • 1 1/2 pounds green cabbage, cored and sliced 1/4 inch thick (9 cups)
  • 1 1/2 pounds collard greens, stems discarded, leaves sliced 1/4 inch thick (12 cups)
  • 3/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper

Get Ingredients

HOW TO MAKE THIS RECIPE

  1. In a small bowl, combine the parsley, minced garlic, lemon zest, 3 tablespoons of the lemon juice and 6 tablespoons of the olive oil. Season with salt and black pepper and mix well.
  2. In a large pot, heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Add the shallots and sliced garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until light golden, about 5 minutes. Add the green cabbage, collard greens and the remaining 
2 tablespoons of olive oil and season with salt and black pepper. Cook over moderately high heat, stirring, until the collards and cabbage are wilted and crisp-tender, 7 to 8 minutes. Stir in the crushed red pepper and the remaining 1 tablespoon of lemon juice. Transfer the greens to a platter, top with the gremolata and serve.

 

PUMPKIN AND CARROT SOUP WITH CRISPY PANCETTA AND FRIED SAGE

Ingredients
Serves 6

2 lbs pumpkin, peeled, deseeded, cut into ½-inch pieces
1 lbs carrots, peeled, cut into ½-inch pieces
4 tablespoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
4 cups vegetable stock
2 cups water
Salt and pepper to taste

6 oz. pancetta, diced (if you can’t find pancetta, use good-quality bacon)
Handful sage leaves

Directions

Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C) and place a rack in the middle.
Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Place pumpkin and carrot pieces on the lined baking sheet. Drizzle over 2 tablespoons of oil and toss to coat.
Roast for 30-35 minutes or until golden and tender.
In the meantime, heat remaining two tablespoons of olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat.
Add onion, a pinch of salt and cook, stirring every now and then for 15 minutes, until soft and translucent.
Add garlic, mustard seeds, coriander, cumin and turmeric. Cook for 2 minutes, until fragrant (and mustard seeds start to pop).
Add roasted pumpkin and carrot pieces and give a good stir. Add vegetable stock, water, and bring to a boil.
Reduce to a simmer, cover with a lid and cook for 15 to 20 minutes. Turn off the heat and let cool for 15 minutes.
Using an immersion blender, puree the soup until smooth (alternatively transfer the pumpkin mixture in batches to the jug of a blender). Adjust the seasonings with salt and pepper. Add more stock if needed to reach the desired consistency.
Before serving, in a nonstick fry pan over medium heat, cook the pancetta, stirring occasionally, until the fat has rendered and the pancetta is browned and crispy, 8 to 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pancetta to a paper towel-lined plate. Set aside.
Add sage leaves to the frying pan and fry in the rendered pancetta fat for 1 minute, until crispy. Transfer the fried sage pancetta to the paper towel-lined plate.
Divide soup among soup bowl, top with pancetta, fried sage and serve.
From the Mesa Top: Nov 17, 2016

Climatology 2016:  The warm fall will be interrupted later this week by a cold and windy storm.  It does not bring an appreciable promise of snow though.

Warming up again over the weekend.

From the Wild:  Bird song all around.  It sounds like spring.  Even some insects are thriving outside, which is just as surprising in Mid-November

Cow stories:  The word from up on the Glorieta Freedom Ranch is about contented cows.  Lounging around, chewing their cuds.

When the forage is more scant, the cows have to keep grazing and moving and have little time to ruminate.

Now they are able to be lazy and content because they have so much grass.

This means that they are able to fill their rumens quickly enough that they have now the easy life of sitting around, with plenty of time to ruminate.

Remembering the long and arduous walk across the mesa to get them up to the ranch, one hopes that they somehow “get” the connection:  effort leads to results.  Not really a cow thing probably.

Back at Mesa Top, Abigail is ready to calf any day now.  She is the craziest cow ever when she has her calf:  she would stampede anyone who gets near her if she gets a chance.  We are hoping for a calf verty soon, before the cold and wind come along.

Beneficial birds:  The next batch of baby chicks arrive this week.  These are laying hens, aiming to be sure that we have strong production next summer. The new brooding area that we constructed in early fall is very well built

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

 

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

 

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of November 10th, 2016

 

Check out the Webstore:

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday November 10th, 2016

Dino Kale from Synergia Ranch

Tomatillos from Soy y Tierra

Red Rome Apples from Martinez Orchard

Braising Greens from Anthony Youth Farm

Herb mix (Thyme, Lemon Basil and Oregano) from Anthony Youth Farm

Broccoli from Schwebach Farm

 

We are checking on how much broccoli the Schwebach family has in the field, if they don’t have enough we will do cabbage instead.

Anthony Youth Farm is sending up a great Italian herb mix for shares this week! The herbs can be used fresh, but any extras you have should be dried, for use anytime in the next year.

herbs1

To Air-Dry:

  1. Gather 5-10 branches together and tie with string or a rubber band. The smaller the bundle, the easier and faster they will dry.
  2. Put the bundle of herbs, stem-side up, in a paper bag. Tie the end of the bag closed, being sure not to crush the herbs as you do, and poke a few holes in the bag for ventilation.
  3. Hang the bag by the stem end in a warm, well-ventilated room.

Your herbs may be dried and ready to store in as little as one week.

To Oven-Dry:

  1. Place herb leaves or seeds on a cookie sheet one inch deep or less.
  2. Put herbs in an open oven on low heat – less than 180 degrees F – for 2-4 hours. To see if the herbs are dry, check if leaves crumble easily. Oven-dried herbs will cook a little, removing some of the potency and flavor, so you may need to use a little more of them in cooking.

 

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, …

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Fall crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Apples: Fuji and Rome: On the marketplace

Cilantro and Peppermint: On the marketplace

Black Spanish and Diakon Radishes: On the marketplace

Tomatillos: In your share and On the marketplace

Rainbow Carrots: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Kale: On the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

 

SMOKED CHICKEN, BROCCOLI AND BLACK BEAN SOUP

georges-smoked-chicken-broccoli-black-bean-soup

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 C Unsalted butter
  • 1/2 C Diced carrots
  • 1/2 C Diced onions
  • 1/2 C Diced celery
  • 1 C Broccoli stems, peeled & diced
  • 2 t Dried thyme
  • 2 t Dried oregano
  • 1 t Dried sweet basil
  • 1/4 C Dry white wine
  • 4 C Chicken stock, hot
  • 1 T Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 t Tabasco sauce
  • 1 C Cooked black beans
  • 1 C Broccoli florets
  • 2 C Heavy cream
  • 2 T Cornstarch mixed with a small amount of warm water (optional)
  • Salt and ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1C Diced smoked chicken

 

PREPARATION

FOR THE SOUP

In 1/4 cup butter, sauté carrots, onion, celery and broccoli stems for 5 minutes. Add thyme, oregano and basil; sauté 5 minutes more. Add wine and deglaze pan. Add hot chicken stock and reduce by one-third. Add Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce, smoked chicken, beans, broccoli florets: simmer for 5 minutes. Add cream, simmer for 5 minutes more and season to taste (thickening with cornstarch is desired). Drop in remaining butter, piece by piece, stirring until melted and serve immediately.

FOR THE SMOKED CHICKEN

On a covered grill, slightly smoke boneless chicken until fully cooked (about 30 mins.) Our Chef uses applewood chips and does not allow the grill to become too hot.

 

Still got that Spaghetti Squash from last week? Try Broccoli & Cheese Stuffed Spaghetti Squash

broccoli-cheese-stuffed-speghetti-squash-7_thumb

Ingredients

  1. 1 spaghetti squash, cut in half
  2. non stick spray
  3. 2 cups chopped broccoli florets
  4. 3 cloves garlic, minced
  5. 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  6. pinch of salt and pepper
  7. 1 tsp Italian season (or use a mix of oregano, basil, thyme)
  8. 1/2 cup part skim shredded mozzarella cheese (I like to shred my own)
  9. 1/3 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded

Instructions

  1. 1. In a microwave save dish, place your squash halves side by side. Add about 1/4 cup water to the bottom of the dish (water should be covering the bottom, but not more than 1/4 inch high). Place into microwave and cook on high for 9-11 minutes, or until squash is tender** Remove, and set aside for about 10 minutes to cool.
  2. 2. In a skillet coated with nonstick spray, add red pepper flakes and cook for 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Add broccoli and garlic, stirring to combine. Add about 2 TBS water to the skillet, and turn up the heat. Saute for 3-5 more minutes, or until the chopped broccoli is tender. Add mixture to a large bowl, discarding any left over water.
  3. 3. Using a fork, scrape out the flesh/’spaghetti’ of the squash, and add it to the large bowl with the broccoli mixture. Add Parmesan cheese, salt and pepper, and Italian seasoning to the mixture, stir to combine.
  4. 4. Turn your broiler on medium/high. Distribute the mixture back into the squash shells, then sprinkle 1/4 cup of mozzarella cheese on top of each squash half. Place shells into an oven safe baking dish/pan.
  5. 5. Place under broiler, watching carefully. Remove when cheese is bubbling and browned, about 2-3 minutes depending on how close the squash is to the broiler.
  6. 6. Remove and enjoy!

 

ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND KALE SOUP

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb. Italian sausage, ground
  • 1½ tsp crushed red pepper
  • 1 large onion
  • ½ lb. bacon, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 10 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 3 large potatoes (Russet or Idaho), peeled and sliced
  • 1 small bunch of kale, washed, stemmed and chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Saute Italian sausage and crushed red pepper in a large pot until sausage is cooked through.
  2. Remove it from the pan and set aside.
  3. In the same pan, add bacon, onions and garlic and cook over medium low heat until onions are soft, about 15 minutes.
  4. Add chicken stock and heat to a boil and then turn to a simmer.
  5. Add the potatoes and cook until soft, about half an hour.
  6. Add the cream, turn off the heat, stir in the sausage and kale and let heat through then serve.

 

Black Bean Chili with Hot Italian Sausage and Tomatillos

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INGREDIENTS:
Main Ingredients
1 pound dried black beans
2 hot Italian sausages, skinned and crumbled
1 red onions, chopped large
4 large garlic cloves, skinned and sliced thin
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped small
28 ounce can of whole tomatoes, hand squashed with juices
1/2 pound tomatillos, cut in quarters
1 T tomato paste
2 to 3 T of peanut oil
Spice Mixture
1 1/2 T chili powder
1 1/2  t smoky paprika
1 1/2 t ground cumin
2 pinches red pepper flakes
sea or kosher salt to taste
several turns of freshly ground black pepper
1 T apple cider vinegar for finishing
sour cream for garnish

PREPARATION:
Beans
1. Soak overnight with enough water to cover after they have swelled up. Usually about 2 cups more than it takes to cover them.
2. Drain the beans and reserve the liquid for the chili.

Chili
1. Pour the oil into a large Dutch oven and place on medium heat.
2. Skin and crumble the sausage into the hot oil and saute,  breaking up with a spatula into bite sized pieces.
3. After five minutes or when the meat is slightly browned, add the onion, tomatillos and jalapeno and saute for another 5 minutes, scraping the browned bits off the bottom and deglazing the pot.
About 3 minutes into this add the garlic.
4. Reduce the heat to low and squeeze the tomatoes into large pieces as you add them and their liquid to the pot. Then add the seasoning mixture, tomato paste and enough bean liquid to cover everything.
5. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat and simmer covered for 3 hours stirring occasionally to prevent burning. The liquidity of the chili can be adjusted by cracking the lid to let moisture escape in the last hour.

 

PLATING:
1. As with everything else, serving in pre-warmed bowls keeps the chili warm while it is eaten.
2. Garnish with sour cream and a sprig of parsley.

 

Creamy Polenta with Braised Greens and Poached Eggs

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Ingredients

For the chili oil:
1/4 cup stemmed and finely chopped Tutto Calabria hot long red chile peppers, or hot cherry peppers
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt
For the polenta:
1 cup whole milk
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup polenta or stone-ground yellow cornmeal
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
1/2 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
For the braised greens:
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 small red onion, halved and thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 1/4 pounds mustard greens, ribs removed, leaves chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
For the egg:
1 tablespoon white vinegar
4 eggs
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
Chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, for serving
Directions
Make the chile oil: Combine the chopped chiles, olive oil and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a small saucepan over low heat and cook 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool completely. Transfer to a bowl, cover and refrigerate up to 1 week. (You will have about 1 1/4 cups chile oil.)

Cook the polenta:

Bring 3 cups cold water, the milk, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper to a boil in a medium saucepan over high heat. Gradually whisk in the polenta; whisk constantly until the mixture is smooth and begins to thicken, about 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer, stirring often, until tender and thickened but still creamy, about 30 minutes. Add more hot water as needed if the mixture seems too dry. Stir in the butter and cheese.
Meanwhile, make the braised greens: Heat the olive oil in a large high-sided saute pan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly golden brown, about 2 minutes. Add the greens, season with salt and pepper and toss. Reduce the heat to medium, stir in 1 cup water, cover and cook until wilted and soft, about 20 minutes. Remove the lid during the last 5 minutes to cook off any additional liquid. Stir in the red wine vinegar just before serving.
Poach the eggs:

Heat 3 cups water with the white vinegar until simmering in a large high-sided frying pan. Break each egg into a cup, then gently add to the water. Poach until the yolks are nearly set, 4 to 5 minutes. Remove the eggs from the pan with a slotted spoon to drain the liquid and place on a plate. Season with salt and pepper.
To serve, spoon some of the polenta into bowls, top with some of the greens and a poached egg per bowl. Drizzle with the chile oil and garnish with the chopped parsley.

From the Mesa Top: Nov 10, 2016

Climatology 2016:  The thirsty ground drank and drank and drank as last week ended with a multi-day rain. Most of the time the rain at Mesa Top was steady and soaking, with a brief surge of rainfall intensity from time to time.

The temoperatures were moderate, and the storm had a very tropical feeling

The old reliable tin can measured 1.25 inches of water.

The Sangres are FINALLY covered with snow.

Cold mornings are coming as the week progresses.

From the Wild:  Bird song can be heard all around after the storm ended.  The jubilant and jumbled up boisterousness of the birds sounded a lot like spring.  It was likely their last hurrah.  Winter is knocking on the door

Cow stories:  The herd up at Glorieta Freedom Ranch are getting fat on deep grass.  After several days of monitoring their water use, we are basing water availability on 1o gallons per cow per day.

Water for the ranch has to be hauled up from Glorieta, up a nasty old county road that transitions into a forest service road with an 18% grade at the top.  SO that is quite chore. Fortunately there is a very reliable water hauling contractor in Glorieta, and so all is well with the water for the cows.

While it had been our plan to get the cows up to the ranch in summer, in retrosopect the later time was a godsend if for reasons of water management alone.

The cows drink 2 x as much water in summer, sometimes even more!

Now we have to gather our forces for the walk home in a few weeks.

We are looking for volunteers, walkers, runners, riders.  Let us know if you might be interested.  A long steady walk behind some amiable and easy going cows…

 

 

Beneficial birds:  The last 50 meat birds have eaten their last meal and are processed, packed, and in the freezer.

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

 

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of November 3rd, 2016

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday November 3rd, 2016

Spaghetti Squash from Keller Family Farm

Beets from Schwebach Farm

Tomato from Anthony Youth Farm

Purple Plum Radishes from Anthony Youth Farm

Cauliflower Half/Quarter from Silver Leaf Farm

Collards from Synergia Ranch

 

The Cauliflowers coming from Silverleaf Farm this week are massive, as you can see, so members will received either a half or a quarter of one depending on the size.

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Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, …

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Fall crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Apples: Fuji: On the marketplace

Pepper- Santa Fe Grande, Habanero: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Oyster Mushrooms: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Kale: On the marketplace

Mustard Greens: On the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

 

Spaghetti Squash Marinara

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Ingredients

1 medium raw spaghetti squash, (about 2 1/2 lb)
1 tsp olive oil
1 small onion(s), chopped
1 tsp garlic clove(s), minced
14 1/2 oz canned stewed tomatoes, cut up
1 tsp Italian seasoning
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Directions

Preheat oven to 350ºF.
Halve squash lengthwise and scoop out seeds.
Place squash, cut sides down, in a large baking dish and prick skin all over with a fork.
Bake until tender, 30 to 40 minutes.
Meanwhile, to make the sauce, heat oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat.
Add onion and garlic and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes.
Stir in tomatoes and Italian seasoning; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, stirring often, 5 minutes or until desired consistency.
To serve, carefully rake the stringy squash pulp from the skin with a fork, separating it into strands that look like spaghetti.
Spoon sauce over squash and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Yields about 1 1/2 cups of squash, 1/4 cup of sauce and 1 tablespoon of cheese per serving.

 

Cauliflower Pizza Crust Recipe

cheese-pizza-cauliflower-pizza-crust-recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 head cauliflower 7 – 8″ wide
  • 1 egg, large
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan or Mozzarella cheese, grated/shredded & not packed
  • 1 tsp Italian (or rosemary, basil, parsley) herb seasoning
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F and line round pizza baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Rinse cauliflower, remove the outer leaves and separate into florets with a paring knife. Place cauliflower florets in a food processor and process until “rice” texture. Some coarse chunks are fine.
  3. Place on a prepared baking sheet and bake for 15 mins.
  4. Remove cooked cauliflower from the oven and transfer to a bowl lined with a double/triple layered cheesecloth.
  5. Then squeeze the liquid out of the ball, cauliflower inside the cheesecloth, as hard as you can. Be patient and do this a few times until barely any liquid comes out. Muscle work.
  6. Increase oven T to 450 degrees F. Transfer cauliflower to a mixing bowl along with egg, cheese, herb seasoning, salt, black pepper and mix to combine. Transfer cauliflower mixture onto the same baking sheet you used to roast the florets (I used the same parchment paper but you can swap it for a new one if it gets too soggy), and flatten with your hands until thin pizza crust forms.
  7. Bake for 15 – 20 minutes and remove from the oven.
  8. Top with your favourite toppings and bake again until cheese on top turns golden brown. Slice and enjoy.

TAHINI-BEET DIP

egypt-recipe-beet-tahini-2000x1500

Ingredients

1 lb. beets, trimmed

12 cup tahini

3 tbsp. fresh lemon juice

2 cloves garlic

3 ice cubes

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

tbsp. Extra-virgin olive oil, to garnish

1 pine nuts, toasted, to garnish

Aish baladi or pita, to serve

Instructions

Bring a medium saucepan of water to a boil. Add beets and cook until tender, about 1 hour. Drain and peel the beets, then transfer to a blender along with tahini, lemon juice, garlic, and ice cubes. Season with salt and pepper and purée until smooth. Spoon into a bowl and garnish with a drizzle of olive oil and pine nuts.

 

Greek Yogurt Chicken Alfredo Spaghetti Squash Boats

holding-greek-yogurt-chicken-alfredo-spaghetti-squash-boats-recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 medium spaghetti squash*
  • 2 large garlic cloves
  • 1 tbsp olive oil, extra virgin
  • 3/4 cup chicken stock, low sodium
  • 2 tsp cornstarch
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup (2 oz) Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 3/4 cup plain Greek yogurt, non-fat
  • 2 cups (6 oz) cooked chicken breast, shredded
  • 1/4 cup low fat Mozzarella cheese, shredded

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 F degrees F. Cut spaghetti squash in half lengthwise and scoop the seeds out. Place cut side down on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool until safe to the touch, about 15 minutes.
  2. In the meanwhile, preheat large skillet on medium heat and add olive oil. Add garlic and saute for a minute or two or until fragrant, stirring frequently. Add chicken stock, cornstarch, salt, pepper and whisk until smooth. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer for a few minutes until sauce has thickened a bit. Remove from heat, add Parmesan cheese and stir until smooth and cheese has melted. Add Greek yogurt and stir again until smooth. Add chicken and stir to combine. Set aside.
  3. Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees F. Using a fork, separate spaghetti squash into strands leaving them inside the shells. Scoop Chicken Alfredo sauce on top of each shell and gently move around with a fork to make the sauce settle deeper into the spaghetti squash. Top each shell with 2 tbsp Mozzarella, place in a baking dish and bake for 10 – 12 minutes and then broil on High for 5 more minutes. Stir the squash with a sauce a bit before serving and serve hot.

HONEY CHILLI CAULIFLOWER

honey20chilli20cauliflower

Ingredients

  • 1/2 kg cauliflower – cut into small florets
  • 1/2 cornflour
  • salt as per taste
  • pepper as per taste
  • 1 egg
  • water as needed
  • oil for deep frying
  • 1 tbsp white sesame seeds -slightly roasted
  • For Sauce
  • 1/4 cup melted butter
  • 1/2 cup clear honey
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice

Method

Mix together the cornflour, salt, pepper, egg and enough water to make a batter of pouring consistency. Heat oil. Dip cauliflower into batter and fry till cooked through but crisp (like a pakora). Remove from the oil and transfer on to absorbent paper. Mix honey, butter and lemon juice and just before serving mix the gobi into it and heat over high heat to heat through. Serve hot, garnished with the sesame seeds.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: Nov 3, 2016

Climatology 2016:  As the calendar turns to November the weather pattern is shifting.  The atmosphere will continue to moisten and by late week there will be a high likelihood of rain for much of our area.

The daily reports of record heat are behind us, at least for a while.  We are hoping instead for meaningful moisture.  The thirsty ground is ready!

From the Wild:  A flock of several dozen ducks on the reservoir this morning.  Frequent sounds of woodpeckers tapping out the bugs from the bark of tress. Coyote serenades every night.

Cow stories:  The legendary cattle drive has been completed.  Well, in one direction anyway.  Saturday was another day of record heat.  27 mixed mommas and calfs, dry cows and bulls, walked about 13 miles up to the Glorieta Freedom Ranch.  Four horses and riders, 2 pickup trucka and a runner/walker, and a golden retriever constituted the support team.

Although it was not an easy trip, it was a successful one!  The cows could not help themselves as we got into the last 3 miles of the trek: they found shade and some of their favorite grasses, still green and they basically quit cooperating for a while.

A few additional people showed up spontaneously and lent a hand over the last few miles.  The water truck trailed the procession up the last ¾ mile hill.  The thirsty beasts, including cows, horses, riders, walkers and even Seamus the dog, were all watered and resting before sundown.

Oh, and 4 calfs were born in the last week.  2 more mommas are big and ready to calf. That group stayed home.

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Beneficial birds:  No new bird news.  The cows took center stage and ALL of our attention

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

 

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of October 20th, 2016

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for

Thursday October 20th, 2016

Delicata Squash from Keller Family Farm

Hon Tsai Tai form Chispas Farm

Fuji Apples from Owl Peak Farm

Red Russian Kale from Vida Verde

Salad Turnips from Vida Verde

Almond Brittle Sample from Zing Nuts

 

Introducing Zing Nuts!

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I have been anticipating introducing you to this producer for the last few month, since I heard that they were finally ready to share their family recipe with the world! To understand the product, you have to first know a little history. I have known the Davies-Lechnor family for the last 2 decades, so the majority of my life. I met Austin, Jono and Chelsea (the children) when our family moved into an apartment complex near Boulder, CO. Through the decades, we have been very close families, with us kids remaining very close friends to this day. The holidays were always a time where our families spent time together, I was practically adopted from spending so much time with them, but if our families couldn’t get together, we would exchange gifts. Our family would give the Davies-Lechnors a turkey, or sometimes something else we raised, and they would give us a plate of Rand’s Almond brittle. It wasn’t until I was older, that I came to really appreciate the brittle as something other than just a sweet treat, it a gift of their family tradition and love.

Rand Lechnor has a long career in the film industry, in cinematography. This summer, he and the family decided that it was time to share his family recipe for almond brittle with the world, starting with the Farmers Markets in Louisville, CO and online ordering. I rarely break with our commitment to only sourcing our food locally, but this time I needed to make an exception. The brittle is fabulous, and with a variety of flavors, it is hard not to get addicted. Moreover, the chance for me to be able to share this family tradition with your family, in hopes that some sugar, salt, butter, vanilla and nuts bring more families closer over the holidays!

 

Zing Nuts: The Real Story by Chelsea Davies-Lechner

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On a cold December morning in Boulder, Colorado the snow was falling outside my window as the morning light crept in. I lay curled up under heaps of blankets and pillows unwilling to get up and face the cold winter day. Suddenly the aroma of warm vanilla and molten sugar trickle into my room as I hear my father’s loud voice booming from the kitchen as he laughs and bangs around pots and pans. A smile starts to make its way across my tired little face as this smell was all too familiar. I throw the covers off and bound out of bed and into the kitchen. My father smiles, embraces me in a good morning hug, then hands me an apron and a wooden spatula….it was almond brittle time!

My father could tell you an almost identical story about his childhood December mornings. Our Almond Brittle has been a tradition handed down through the Lechner family for generations. Sugar, vanilla, butter, salt, and almonds. A simple recipe that, when made with love, tantalizes the taste buds and delights the soul. As a family, we decided to share this incredible part of our holidays in the hope that it would bring as much joy and happiness to others as it has brought to us.

Zing Nuts is a family-owned, family-run business that started out of my father’s kitchen in Boulder, Colorado with just an old cast iron skillet and a dream. We spent tireless hours brainstorming, cooking, laughing and creating this fantastic product that we are now proud to share with the world!

We are committed to use only the finest natural ingredients ensuring the most delicious and true-to-tradition product. After partnering with a local chef and salt artist, we now offer six delectable flavors. Original, Colorado Beer Salt, Orange Thai, Habanero, Tequila-Lime Salt and Pumpkin Spice.

We envision a world where the taste of our almond brittle elicits fond memories of family, friends, tradition and happiness. We believe that you have to treat yourself and not at the expense of preservatives and ingredients that you can’t pronounce.
But be careful! Once you open a bag, you won’t be able to stop at one!

 

 

Art Project

One of our volunteers suggested that we eventually have a photo gallery of our coolest, weirdest, and most amazing local produce. We are always trying to snap a photo of the produce as it comes in from the farm and share it with members, but framing it as an ongoing project, might just make us remember to photograph things more often. We would also love member help! Anytime you get some amazingly unique food in your share (or other local food!), snap a picture, and email it to us or tag us on Instagram (beneficialfarmcsa) or another social media (that we are barely able to keep up with). At some point, we will have a little more of a store front at our Oshara location, and we plan to have a video gallery of our awesome produce on slideshow.

Just to kick things off, we were blown away with the Oyster Mushrooms last week!

 oyster20mushroom2010-3-16_zpsbazj9i5a

Chicken!

We are still going on processing chickens, close to 200 hundred are done so far, maybe one more weekend and we will be done! Our birds have had a great summer, rotating around the fields in our mobile fenced areas, and they are now fully grown, for a delicious chicken dinner. We raise all our birds on non-GMO grain from Embudo, hormone free. Colleen and the boys spent the last few Saturday processing the birds, with a hopefully one more weekend project to come. Birds are on the marketplace, $3.99/lb!

image12029_zpsnbygir0u

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation,…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Fall crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Apples: Fuji: On the marketplace

Kale: On the marketplace

Hon Tsai Tai: On the marketplace

Mustard Greens: On the marketplace

Mizuna: On the marketplace

Radishes: On the marketplace

Broccoli Raab: On the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Heirloom Tomatoes: on the Marketplace

 

Delicata squash recipe

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3 medium-sized delicata squash, halved and seeded

1 1/4 pound Italian style chicken sausage (casings removed)

3 tbs extra virgin olive oil

1 bunch curly kale, chopped into bite sized pieces

1 medium-sized yellow onion, chopped

3-4 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 tsp dried sage

dash of cayenne pepper

dash of nutmeg

2 tbs cooking sherry

3 tbs chicken stock (or water)

3/4 cup gruyere cheese

1/4 cup breadcrumbs

salt and pepper

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375.  Drizzle olive oil and salt and pepper onto halved squash.  Place cut side up in the oven for 25 minutes. While squash is roasting prepare your filling.  Heat olive oil in a large skillet.  Add sausage and onion.  Cook for about 10 minutes (until sausage is cooked through) stirring and breaking up the sausage.  Add the garlic, sage, nutmeg, and cayenne. Stir.  Add kale, sherry, and stock.  Stir.  Cover pan and simmer for about 3-5 minutes until kale is starting to wilt and moisture is evaporating. Remove filling from stove and let cook for a few minutes.  Add cheese and stir.  Scoop filling into each squash.  Top with breadcrumbs and bake in the oven at 375 for 20 more minutes.  Serve warm.

 

Hon Tsai Tai Stir Fry

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Ingredients:

1 cup dry quinoa
2 cups water
3 tablespoons sesame oil
1 pound extra firm tofu, cut into small cubes
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 onion, chopped
5 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 ounce chopped crystallized ginger
2 carrots, sliced
2 teaspoon fish sauce
4 tablespoons gluten-free tamari sauce
4 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
3.5 ounces shitake mushrooms, stems removed and sliced
8 oz (about 4 cups chopped) Hon Tsai Tai stems separated from the leaves and flowers- if you can’t find this green at your local grocer or farmer’s market, substitute any leafy green of your choosing.

In a small saucepan place quinoa and the 2 cups of water. Cover and turn to medium. When the lid starts to rattle, turn the heat to low and let simmer for 10-15 minutes, or until all the liquid is absorbed. Keep lid on and pull from heat so the pan doesn’t burn.

Meanwhile, in a large wok or large saucepan add sesame oil and heat over medium.  Add the tofu and red pepper flakes and sauté until the sides are golden brown and crisp, 8-10 minutes.  Add the onion and garlic and stir until translucent, about 2-3 minutes.

Add sliced carrots  and Hon Tsai Tai stems and stir another 2-3 minutes. Add crystalized ginger, fish sauce, rice wine vinegar and tamari sauce, stir another 2 minutes. While carrots are still crunchy add mushrooms. Continue stirring until carrots are soft and mushrooms have thoroughly cooked, about 2-3 minutes more. Just prior to serving add the Hon Tsai Tai leaves and flowers, or greens of your choice.  Immediately pull from heat and continue mixing the greens into the stir-fry. The heat from the other ingredients will wilt the greens.  Serve over quinoa.

 

ROASTED RADISHES AND SALAD TURNIPS WITH PESTO

roasted-radishes-and-salad-turnips-with-pesto21

Ingredients

  • 3 bunches small to medium radishes with leaves
  • 1 bunch small to medium salad turnips with greens
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • sea salt
  • 1/4 cup raw, hulled pepitas
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest plus 1 tablespoon juice
  • 1 small clove garlic, smashed and minced

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. Immerse radish and salad turnips in water and shake to remove sand. Rinse well and pat dry.
  3. Toss pepitas into a small oven-proof skillet or pan and toast in the oven for 3 – 4 minutes, or just until the first few pop. Set aside to cool.
  4. Cut the greens from the roots, leaving a 1/2-inch sprig of greens on the radishes and turnips. Set greens aside. Halve radishes and turnips (quarter larger ones). Arrange radishes and turnips on a baking sheet (or 2), and just drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle with sea salt. Roast for 20 – 25 minutes, or until the edges are golden and the vegetables are tender.
  5. Meanwhile, chop 3 bunches of the greens – enough to make 1 loosely packed cup. Place greens in the bowl of a food processor and add 5 tablespoons olive oil, a pinch of sea salt, lemon zest and juice, and toasted pepitas. Pulse to combine. Aim for a smooth mixture with a bit of texture. Adjust salt or lemon as needed.
  6. Spoon pesto into a wide bowl and surround it with roasted radishes and salad turnips. Sprinkle with sea salt and freshly ground pepper. Serve immediately.

 

Kale and Red Onion Savory Breakfast Squares

kale-breakfast-squares-baked-kalynskitchen

Ingredients:

1 bunch Red Russian Kale, chopped, or use any other variety of kale
1/2 red onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced (1/2 tsp. teaspoon minced garlic)
1/2 tsp. olive oil
1 tsp. Tamari or other soy sauce
1 C grated cheese (I used a blend of low-fat cheese called Pizza Cheese which has mozzarella, provolone, romano, and parmesan)
1/4 cup 100% whole wheat bread crumbs (optional; I’ve made this many times without the bread crumbs)
6 eggs, beaten well

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350F. Cut off kale stems and discard, then wash kale leaves and dry well. (I used a salad spinner.) Pile kale leaves up on top of each other and cut into strips about 3/4 inch wide, then turn cutting board the other way and cut again so you have squares just under an inch square. Chop onion into pieces about 1/2 inch.

Heat olive oil in large heavy frying pan, then add onions and saute 3 minutes. Add garlic and saute about 2 more minutes, then add kale, turning over as it wilts and sauteeing about 5 minutes, or until kale is significantly wilted and softened.

Put sauteed vegetables into large bowl and add Tamari, cheese, bread crumbs, beaten eggs, and Spike seasoning. Stir gently until ingredients are well distributed. Spray pen with olive oil or nonstick spray and pour in egg mixture. Bake 20-25 minutes until eggs are well set and the top is lightly browned. Serve hot. This is good with low-fat sour cream or salsa.

 

ROASTED DELICATA SQUASH WITH TAHINI

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The rich tahini sauce perfectly complements the winter squash while providing heart benefits through oils in the sesame seeds. Serves 4-6.

  • 2-3 delicata squash (about 2 pounds)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • Juice from 1 lemon

 

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Clean squash well. Slice into rings 1/2-inch thick and remove seeds and pulp by slicing inner edge of squash rings.

Toss with 1 tablespoon oil and place on a baking sheet in a single layer. Sprinkle with one pinch of salt per pan and roast about 10-12 minutes on each side until soft and browned on edges.

While squash is roasting, blend remaining salt, olive oil, tahini, and lemon in a food processor or by hand until well blended.

Remove squash from oven, allow to cool slightly, and serve with tahini sauce for dipping.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: Oct 20, 2016

Climatology 2016:  What’s going on here?  The calendar has been turned back and we are basking in mid September heat.

Eastern NM has broken previous temperature records by 5 degrees.

That would be like Albuquerque temps hitting 115 in the summer and Santa Fe hitting 110

Considering the way the wind is blowing, let’s just hope that there are no managed fires burning, because they will not stay “managed” for long

From the Wild:  The great horned owl has returned… the call of hoot, hoot-hoot is around the farm most nights.

Cow stories:  Each day more cows are coming in from the far pastures.  The forage supply is dwindling.  There is no more green growth ahead.  The herd needs to be looked over again to find the upcoming fall calfers.  Hopefully one more pasture can be grazed off.  And some number of young calfs weaned and sold.

Beneficial birds:  the great horned owl has returned to the chicken coops, killing only the young and tender birds.  The hunter decapitates its prey and the eats the soft meat and organs and leaves most of the body behind. It is time to tighten up the doors and windows and begin shutting up the birds at night. (Another sign of the next change of seasons, soon to come)

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of October 13th, 2016

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday October 13th, 2016

Sunchokes from Synergia Ranch

Daikon Radishes from Vida Verde

Mustard Greens from Vida Verde

Tomatillos from Sol y Tierra

Cabbage from Cerro Vista

Red Onions from Owl Peak Farm

 

Cabbage this week will be either red or green, depending on the member share. If you have a preference, please let us know.

 

Garlic issues last week?

If anyone had some poor quality garlic get into their share last week, please let us know and we will credit you. We thought that it had stored alright, but when we were putting shares together, we saw some issues that we tried to avoid putting in shares.

Art Project

One of our volunteers suggested that we eventually have a photo gallery of our coolest, weirdest, and most amazing local produce. We are always trying to snap a photo of the produce as it comes in from the farm and share it with members, but framing it as an ongoing project, might just make us remember to photograph things more often. We would also love member help! Anytime you get some amazingly unique food in your share (or other local food!), snap a picture, and email it to us or tag us on Instagram (beneficialfarmcsa) or another social media (that we are barely able to keep up with). At some point, we will have a little more of a store front at our Oshara location, and we plan to have a video gallery of our awesome produce on slideshow.

Just to kick things off, we were blown away with the Oyster Mushrooms last week!

 

Chicken!

We are still going on processing chickens, close to 200 hundred are done so far, maybe one more weekend and we will be done! Our birds have had a great summer, rotating around the fields in our mobile fenced areas, and they are now fully grown, for a delicious chicken dinner. We raise all our birds on non-GMO grain from Embudo, hormone free. Colleen and the boys spent the last few Saturday processing the birds, with a hopefully one more weekend project to come. Birds are on the marketplace, $3.99/lb!

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation,…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Apples: Macintosh and Fuji Apples: On the marketplace

Kale: On the marketplace

Tomatillos: On the marketplace

Santa Fe Grande Peppers: On the marketplace

Red Onions: In your share and on the marketplace

Fuji Apples: On the marketplace

Hon Tsai Tai: On the marketplace

Broccoli Raab: On the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Heirloom Tomatoes: on the Marketplace

 

Sunchoke Hummus with Tomatillo Salsa

SERVINGS 4-6 UNITS

For the Hummus

  • 11 12 ounces sunchokes, scrubbed
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 34cup milk
  • 12 cups cooked chickpeas (canned is fine)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled & crushed

For Tomatillo Salsa

  • 1/2 pounds’ tomatillos, husks removed & washed
  • 1.5 jalapeños
  • 1 garlic cloves
  • 1/4 medium-large onion
  • 1-2 oz fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

DIRECTIONS

  1. Place the Jerusalem artichokes in a saucepan of boiling water & cook for approximately 5 minutes or until tender.
  2. Drain & place artichokes in a food processor with the butter & milk & process until smooth.
  3. Chop the onion in half, crush the garlic, and leave the jalapeños and tomatillos whole. Roast on a baking sheet in a 400-degrees F oven for about 15 minutes, turning all halfway over through roasting time.
  4. Peel the garlic, deseed and rough chop the jalapeño, and peel and rough chop the onion.
  5. In a food processor, add all roasted ingredients, plus cilantro and salt and pulse until all ingredients are chopped and desired consistency is reached.
  6. Place Hummus in dipping container, use spoon to create a hollow in the hummus center, where the tomatillo salsa can be placed. Serve warm or chilled, with tortilla or other chips.

 

Sausage, Cabbage and Red Onion Galette

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 Red Onion
  • ½ small Head cabbage
  • 2 tbsp. fresh thyme
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • Kosher salt and pepper
  • 8 oz. Italian sausage
  • 3 oz. extra-sharp Cheddar
  • 1 rolled pie crust
  • 1 large egg

DIRECTIONS

  1. Heat oven to 400°F. In a large bowl, toss together the onion, cabbage, thyme, oil, and ¼ tsp each salt and pepper. Add the sausage and Cheddar and toss to combine.
  2. Working on a piece of parchment paper, roll the pie crust into a 14-in. circle. Slide the paper (and crust) onto a baking sheet. Spoon the cabbage mixture onto the pie crust, leaving a 2½-in border all the way around. Fold the border of the crust over the cabbage mixture.
  3. Brush the crust with the egg and bake until the crust is golden brown and the vegetables are tender, 20 to 25 minutes. (Cover with foil if the crust is getting dark.)

 

Sunchoke and Apple Salad

INGREDIENTS

  • 12 sunchokes
  •  Olive oil to coat the sunchokes
  • 4 apples, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons toasted pumpkin seeds
  •  Mixed greens: radicchio, bok choy, mizuna, celery leaves
  • ½ cup celery, minced
  • 1 tablespoon shallot, minced

APPLE CIDER VINAIGRETTE

  • 1 cup apple cider
  • 2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  •  Salt to taste
  •  Pepper to taste

PREPARATION

  1. Prepare the sunchokes. Wash sunchokes with the skin on. Slice 2 sunchokes, raw, into thin strips using a mandoline; set aside. Roast the remaining sunchokes. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place them in a pan with olive oil, and roast for about 40 minutes.
  2. Toss the hot sunchokes with the remaining salad ingredients.
  3. Prepare the cider vinaigrette by combining all the vinaigrette ingredients; dress the salad and season with salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with raw sunchoke slices.

 

Sweet Potato Tomatillo Bisque

YIELD: 4-6 servings depending

INGREDIENTS:

1-1/2 pounds Sweet Potatoes or Yams

8-10 small to medium Tomatillos, cut in half

1 large (or 2 smaller} Roma Tomato, cut in half

1 small Jalapeno, cut in half

Olive Oil

1/3 cup diced Shallots

5 small cloves fresh Garlic

1/4 cup Dry Sherry Wine

2 cups Low-Sodium Chicken Broth, or more until reached desired consistency

Kosher Salt

Toasted Whole Grain Bread Croutons, for garnish

Lightly Salted Roasted Pepitas, for garnish

Snipped Fresh Chives, for garnish

Aleppo Pepper, for garnish

 

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Place sweet potatoes on a metal sheet pan.

On a separate sheet pan, place the tomatillos, tomato and jalapeno. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and season with 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt. Slide both pans into your preheated oven. Roast the tomatillo/tomato/jalapeno for 25 to 30 minutes and remove. Continue roasting the sweet potatoes until a knife glides through effortlessly, about 30 more minutes {40-60 minutes total, depending on size}.

Meanwhile in a small skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add in shallots plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt and sauté until soft, 5 minutes. Add in garlic and cook 1 to 2 minutes. Pour in sherry and simmer until reduced by 90%, about 8 to 10 minutes.

Allow the potatoes to cool until safe to handle, peel back the skins and use a spoon to scoop the flesh out adding it into a blender or food processor. Place the roasted vegetables {removing the stems from the jalapeno and tomato}, all of their juices and the sherried shallots and garlic into the blender as well. Add in a cup of broth, secure the lid and puree until smooth.

Pour the puree into a 4 quart Dutch oven and heat over medium-low, add in more broth until reached desired consistency {about 1 more cup}. Taste and season with salt, for me it was an additional 1-1/4 teaspoon.

Once soup is hot, ladle into bowls and top with croutons, pepitas and a sprinkle Aleppo pepper and snipped fresh chives.

 

Sunchoke Soup

t-103

8 sunchokes
1 large onion
4 potatoes
2-1/2 Tbsp butter
4 cloves garlic
2 bay leaves
8 cups chicken stock
Sea salt & fresh ground pepper
Garnish: cream, creme fraiche, fresh herbs, croutons, etc

Peel and chop the sunchokes, onion and potatoes.  Put them in a dutch oven with the butter, season with sea salt and pepper, and saute until the onions are transparent.  Add in the garlic and saute a few more minutes.  Add the bay leaves and chicken stock and simmer for 30 minutes.  Remove the bay leaves and puree with an immersion blender or blender.  Taste for seasoning and serve in warm bowls with garnish of choice and lots of yummy bread to dip in the soup!

 

Simple Sauteed Mustard Greens

Ingredients
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 bunches mustard greens, stemmed and chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup chicken stock
1 tablespoon stone-ground mustard

Directions
In a large pan with straight sides on medium heat add the oil. Add the garlic to the hot oil. Saute until garlic is softened and fragrant and has infused the oil.
Add the mustard greens. Season the greens with salt, and pepper, and saute while tossing to wilt. Once wilted add the chicken stock and stir. Raise heat to a simmer, then lower and cook for about 5 minutes more.
Stir in the ground mustard. Serve warm.

From the Mesa Top: Oct 13, 2016

Climatology 2016:  The fall weather pattern includes warm subtropical moisture being drawn up in advance if cold air moving in from the west.  Two days with lovely rains came and went this past weekend that fit the picture exactly.

Now we are back to clear and dry air. The sun feels very warm and the shade is cool. There is no hint of precipitation for the next week or so.

From the Wild:  up to 8 ducks at a time on the reservoir, which is near capacity.  This means that there is enough surface area for the ducks to swim off to the opposite side of the reservoir, rather than flying off.

This is what we want to have in spring:  a full reservoir and plenty of shore vegetation. Then we will have ducklings!

Cow stories:  We are checking the cows out a few at a time and moving them over to a fresh pasture.  All look good.  Some of the older cows are very wide and likely will calf in the next 4 to 6 weeks.  We will need to begin keeping those cows close to home!

Beneficial birds   The meat birds are mostly in the freezer.  About 50 more to go.  Plenty ready to cook, on hand for the winter.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of October 6th, 2016

Check out the Webstore:http://www.farmigo.com/store/beneficialfarm

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday October 6th, 2016

Org Oyster Mushrooms from Freshies, NM

Collards from Synergia Ranch

Fingerling Potatoes from Owl Peak Farm

Apples (Red Rome probably) from Synergia Ranch

Carrots from Schwebach Farm

Sweet Turnips from Vida Verde

Garlic from Allicin Ranch

 

Fall is upon us

This weekend, I had a fun filled experience I wanted to share with you. We have been working with Mesa Ruiz lately, who juices the famous Harvey’s fresh raw cider, found at the Santa Fe and Eldorado Farmer’s Markets. This season, we have an abundance of apples, and we have been doing some serious planning to help find uses for all of them. Mesa has been juiced fruit for us for years, creating some exceptional blends like our local pomegranate apple juice. He has also been growing his operation, expanding to a larger press, and improving his methods. For anyone that has tried his apple cider, you know the full blast of autumn flavor that he imparts with every sip. This season, all the stars seem to be aligning, huge apple harvest, our friend wanting to keep expanding, a logistics issue that is keeping Big B’s fresh cider from making it to NM, and the final piece being that the CSA is in a position to help Mesa take things to the next level!

We have been fortunate enough to be able to invest in some equipment Mesa was needing for the next stages, a UV pasteurizer and bottle machine. Mesa’s cider is currently raw, but in order to be able to sell it to the Coop or Wholefoods, it needs to be pasteurized. UV pasteurization is the bare minimum, a proven kill step to eliminate any potential pathogens, but unlike high heat pasteurizing, almost all the flavor is left intact! Through some connections in the larger food world, Steve found a cider maker that had the equipment we needed, but at an amazing used discount price. This all lead up to me “generously” volunteering to fly to Washington State and drive the equipment back. Before my career in the food world, I drove commercial trucks all over the US, and at least once a year, I start yearning for the open road and somehow find work reasons to just take off.

Saturday morning, I took off from ABQ, luckily most of the balloons were barely getting launched. I landed in Spokane, WA, where I picked up my rental truck, and headed over to Chelan, where to sell’s orchard is. After Spokane, the land was very flat and uneventful, I later was to that it was a washed out river bed from when the glaciers melted and cleared everything it its path out. In the last 15 minutes of driving to Chelan, my breath was taken away, being so caught off guard by the unexpected beauty I beheld. Coming off the barren plain, the road descends down into a lush valley, filled with fruit orchards on both sides of the river. What nearly caused me to crash, was as I came down the valley, directly across from me I could see an enormous lake, sitting at the base of a towering mountain, held back by a natural dam that is easily 500ft sheer rock. It was something out of a fairy tale, it is with deep regret that I did not have enough day light to take a picture on the way back. After navigating down one side and up the other of the valley, I traced my way around the edge of the lake, surrounded by a mixture of wonderful houses, well maintained orchards, and some of the nation’s largest apple supplier warehouses. Just the bins for apples that weren’t in use, would easily be the size of a Walmart superstore. I meet Jim, the farmer, at his wife’s hard cider tap room Rootwood Cider. They shared their various ciders, and we discussed the blossoming popularity of local craft ciders. I then went to their orchard, which has been in the family for 4 generations, for the machinery and to get a quick tour. I would not trade our NM farmer’s orchards for the world, but it has been a while since I was in a large commercial farm.

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My journey back took me through Oregon, Idaho, and Utah and now I write to you from Durango, CO, the final leg of my journey will be tomorrow to Dixon, to drop the equipment off with Mesa. This journey reminded me of the larger world of agriculture, and ranching, as I passed through the orchards that will supply apples to millions of Americans, the thousands of acres of hay that feed the cows, whose feed lots I drove past along the way. One of the reasons I love what I do are the stories I get to share with members about their food, being the ambassador on your behalf to ensure that the food our farms grow for you is of the highest quality, and you know you are supporting individual families in your community. While I know that the vast majority of Americans will continue to live in disconnection from their farmers and ranchers, I still see things changing more and more for the better. I can dream of a day when all the Americans that buy apples from Chelan, also get to hear the stories of their community and see the picturesque land that brought forth that fruit, and appreciate the work the farmers put into the food. As much fun as I had traveling across the western part of our country, seeing the majesty of all of nature’s landscape, and also enjoying the local microbrewery innovations along the way, I can’t wait to be back in NM, doing by part to change our corner of the world and support our farmer’s growth.

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On a side note, if any of our members take a weekend trip along the Turquoise Trail, and feel like a cold beer in Cedar Crest, stop in at Ale Republic. They are the first brewery in that area, a crowdsourced brewery that launched in late July, with big aspirations. They are working on developing beers that use local yeast strains, empathizing local sourced ingredients in their beers as they grow. They have worked with us for the Peach Saison beer that is finishing up now, and we are working with Owl Peak Farm to grow the grains the need for their beer. It may be a dream, but I am doing my best to support the dream of creating truly local beer, a locally sustained beer ingredient supply partnered with talented brewers. For my home brewing/wine makers, if you are interested in some bulk deals on local fruit juices, let me know. We will have our apple cider, along with peach, pear and cherry juice available. I am experimenting with a peach apple cider in the very near future.

Thomas                  .

Chili Issue

Big aspirations, but not enough time or labor, always leads to issues. The annual chili project started off well, a bin of chilies was roasted at the beginning of last weekend. Then as the weekend progressed, I wasn’t able to dedicate the same amount of time as I did last year to cleaning and packaging the chili. In hindsight, it did take the full Labor Day weekend in the kitchen doing nothing but chili, I underestimated time needed for this year. A lot of chili got packaged, but by the time I got to the red chili, it was past the safe window for roasted chili, and I did not want to take the chance of any chili going out that would make people sick. Chili has a very short window after being roasted, 3 days is the maximum amount of time to either eat or freeze it before you run the risk of pathogens. I will be seeing who still has chili around, to possibly make a second attempt. I will definitely remember to stagger things next season.

 

Chicken!

What a weekend, the family was certainly kept busy with our projects! Mesa Top Farm started butchering our latest flock of chickens for members. Our birds have had a great summer, rotating around the fields in our mobile fenced areas, and they are now fully grown, for a delicious chicken dinner. We raise all our birds on non-GMO grain from Embudo, hormone free. Colleen and the boys spent Saturday processing the first 50 birds, with a few more weekend projects to come. Birds are on the marketplace, $3.99/lb!

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation,…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation.Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Collards: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Heirloom Tomatoes: on the Marketplace

Mustard Greens: on the Marketplace

Turnips: on the Marketplace

Oyster Mushroom: In your share and on the Marketplace

 

Pasta with Oyster Mushrooms

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Ingredients

  • 450g Oyster Mushrooms
  • 1 -2 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 470ml milk
  • 125g chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 180g chopped tomato
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 350g fettuccine cooked, warm
  • 2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese

Method

  1. Separate oyster mushrooms into pieces. Sauté mushrooms and garlic in butter in a large skillet until soft, about 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in flour. Cook 1 minute.
  3. Add milk, broth, and lemon juice to skillet; heat to boiling.
  4. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, until liquid is reduced by half.
  5. Stir in tomato, salt and pepper; cook over medium heat until hot.
  6. Spoon over pasta and top with cheese

 

Stir-Fried King Oyster Mushroom

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Ingredients:

 

  • 1 packet of king oyster mushrooms, usually came in three.
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 green onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 Tbsp. soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp. sesame oil
  • 1/2 Tbsp. toasted sesame seeds

 

Method:

 

  1. Cut off the roots of king oyster mushrooms.  Rinse and slice.

 

  1. Heat up your wok.  When heated, add in some cooking oil of your choice.  When hot, add in garlic.  Stir-fry until slightly golden, add in sliced mushrooms.  Stir-fry until mushrooms are soften.

 

  1. Add in soy sauce, lemon juice and sesame oil.  Stir-fry well.

 

  1. Lastly add in green onion and toasted sesame seeds.  Stir- well and serve on a plate.

 

Sautéed Collard Greens with Garlic

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INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red-pepper flakes
  • 2 heads collard greens (about 1 pound each), tough stems and ribs removed, leaves coarsely chopped
  • Coarse salt
  • 1/2 cup water

DIRECTIONS

  1. Heat oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Cook garlic, stirring often, until golden, about 3 minutes. Stir in red-pepper flakes, and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in collard greens and 1 teaspoon salt.
  2. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add water, and steam, covered, until greens are just tender and water evaporates, about 10 minutes. If greens are ready but there is still water in the pan, raise heat to medium-high, and cook, uncovered, until completely evaporated.

 

Mashed Carrots and Turnips

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  • 2 pounds carrot, peeled and sliced, about 4 1/2 cups
  • 1 pound turnips, or rutabagas, peeled and cubed, about 3 cups
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • ground black pepper, to taste

Directions

  1. Place the carrots and turnips in a large stockpot and cover with water. Bring to a boil and boil for 40-45 minutes or until very tender. Drain the vegetables.
  2. Add the brown sugar, butter, salt and pepper and mash the vegetables with a potato masher, and then whip with an electric mixer until they’re nice and fluffy.
  3. Serve with parsley for a garnish if desired.

 

Pork Chops With Apples and Garlic Smashed Potatoes

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Ingredients
1 pound small fingerling potatoes
2 cloves garlic
Kosher salt
4 1/2 -inch-thick boneless pork loin chops (5 ounces each)
2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage
Freshly ground pepper
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 large red onion, cut into 1/2-inch wedges
2 Granny Smith apples, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
3/4 cup apple cider
1/4 cup buttermilk

Directions
Put the potatoes and garlic in a saucepan, cover with cold water and season with salt. Cover and bring to a boil, then uncover and continue cooking until tender, about 15 minutes. Cover and set aside.
Meanwhile, rub both sides of the pork chops with the sage, and salt and pepper to taste. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over high heat, then add 1 teaspoon olive oil and sear the chops until golden on both sides, about 5 minutes total. Transfer to a plate. Wipe out the skillet and add the remaining 2 teaspoons olive oil. Add the onion and apples and cook over medium-high heat until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and stir in the cider.
Return the chops to the skillet. Cover and cook, turning once, until just cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes. Drain the potatoes, reserving 1/4 cup liquid. Return the potatoes to the pan; add the buttermilk and mash, adding cooking liquid as needed. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with the pork chops, onion and apples. Drizzle with the pan juices.

 

From the Mesa Top: Oct 6, 2016

Climatology 2016:  Now the fall weather pattern is well established.  Storms are coming across the southwest and ahead of the actual storm a stream of tropical moisture is drawn from the southwest.   If the storms move slowly and on more of a west to east track, we can have some rains and eventually some snow.

If the move on a southwest to northeast track and pass us by to the north, we experience serious winds.

And after the storms blow through, the air calms down and the night temperatures drop.

With one storm passed and another coming, the coldest nights of the fall are promised for late this week, with widespread frost by the weekend.

From the Wild:  The warm season grasses are dry, the pastures soon to be dormant.  Cool season grasses are still green.  Deer are moving, looking for greenery.

The nighthawks have come out.  They are not really hawks.  They have much more in common with swallows.  They feast on bugs.  They have a bad habit of hanging out on or near roads at night.  As a driver approaches, a bright red eye appears and then at the last minute they fly away.  Sometimes they are too late and get splattered on the front grill.  It is best to slow down and give them time to react.

Cow stories:  Time now to bring together all of the cows and check for recent calves and soon to calf mommas.  Some bull calves may be ready to wean and process or maybe to sell.  It is the time of year when calves are sold and herds are reduced in size to get ready for the winter, when there is no grass and hay must be fed.

Beneficial birds   The meat birds are getting onto a new pasture, full of grasshoppers and weeds and produce that has gotten overgrown.  Likely it will be time for processing more this weekend ahead, or maybe next weekend

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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