Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of July 27th, 2017

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday July 27th, 2017
Nectarines from Rancho de Santa Fe
Apricots from Jubilee Farm
Mint from Synergia Ranch
Shallots from Vida Verde Farm
Carrots from Owl Peak Farm
Cucumbers from Mesa Top Farm

Double Up Bucks CSA!
We are happy to share with you that Beneficial Farms is the first CSA in NM to be a part of the Double Up Bucks program, we are now able to offer members on EBT their CSA shares for half off!
Please help us spread the word, we are looking forward to helping get locally grown, healthy food to the families in our community that need it the most.

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Kale: Green Curly, Dino: On the marketplace
Peaches: On the marketplace
Plums: On the marketplace
Nectarines:
Mini Cucumbers: On the marketplace
Collards: On the marketplace
Herbs, Lemon Balm, Spearmint, Peppermint, Tarragon, Sage: On the marketplace
Orange Carrots: On the marketplace
Beets: On the marketplace
Zucchini: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Rishia Zimmern’s Chicken With Shallots 

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INGREDIENTS
• 8 bone-in chicken thighs
• 2 tablespoons flour
• 1 tablespoon kosher salt
• 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
• 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
• 12 to 15 whole medium shallots, peeled
• 2 cups white wine
• 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
• 2 sprigs tarragon
• 2 cups cherry tomatoes, cut in half

PREPARATION
1. Rinse chicken thighs in water, and pat them very dry with paper towels. Sprinkle over them the flour, salt and pepper.
2. Melt the butter in a large, heavy-bottomed pot or skillet set over medium-high heat. When the butter foams, cook the chicken, in batches if necessary, until well browned and crisp on all sides. Set aside.
3. Add the whole shallots to the pot and sauté them in the butter and chicken fat until they begin to soften and caramelize, approximately 10 to 12 minutes. Add the wine to deglaze the pot, stir with a large spoon, then add the mustard and tarragon, then the chicken thighs. Cover the pot, turn the heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes.
4. Remove the lid, and allow the sauce to reduce and thicken, 15 to 20 minutes.
5. Add the cherry tomatoes to the pot, stir lightly to combine and serve immediately.

Stone Fruits with Ginger-Lime Syrup and Mint 

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Ingredients
• 1 cup water
• 1/2 cup sugar
• 1/2 cup sliced fresh ginger, left unpeeled
• 3 ripe peaches, sliced
• 3 ripe plums, sliced
• 3 ripe nectarines, sliced
• 1/4 cup fresh lime juice, from 2 limes
• 1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint
Directions
Bring water, sugar and ginger to a boil in a small saucepan. Turn heat down to low and simmer for 10 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve into shallow bowl and let cool in refrigerator.
Combine sliced fruits in a shallow serving bowl. Add cold ginger syrup, fresh lime juice and mint. Stir to combine. Cover and chill for 45 minutes – 1 hour.

Mint Cheesecake with a Chocolate Cookie Crust 

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Ingredients
The Crust:
• 24 chocolate wafer cookies (homemade or store bought)
• 3 tablespoons butter, melted
The Mint Cheesecake:
• 1 cup packed fresh mint leaves
• 1/4 cup heavy cream
• 2 drops green food coloring
• 1 1/2 pounds cream cheese
• 1 cup sugar
• 1 1/2 cups sour cream
• 6 yolks
• 1 1/2 teaspoons mint extract
• 2 tablespoons Irish whiskey
The Topping:
• 1 cup sour cream
• 2 tablespoons sugar
• 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
Directions
To make the crust: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
In a food processor break up the cookies until they are powder. Add the butter and pulse until it just sticks together. Firmly pat the chocolate crust into an 8-inch springform pan. Bake the crust for about 5 minutes and then cool on rack.
Reduce the oven to 300 degrees F.
To make mint-cream: In a blender or food processor add the mint and heavy cream. Pulse until the mint is well blended in the cream. Add the food coloring. Set aside.
Mix the cheesecake batter: In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the cream cheese and sugar on medium-low speed. Scrape the mixture off the sides of the bowl and make sure it is very smooth. Mix in the sour cream. Add the yolks one at a time, mixing well between each one. Add the mint extract and whiskey and mix until well combined.
Divide the cheesecake batter into two bowls and add the mint-cream mixture to one of the bowls.
Add about 1 cup of the white cheesecake batter to the prepared pan. Then add 1 cup of the mint batter in the center, do not spread it out too much.
Add about 3/4 cup of the white batter, followed by 3/4 cup of the mint batter. Add about 1/2 cup of the white batter, followed by 1/2 cup of the mint batter. Add about 1/4 cup of the white batter, followed by 1/4 cup of the mint batter. Add about 2 tablespoons of the white batter, followed by 2 tablespoons of the mint batter.
Tightly wrap the springform pan with foil and then bake the cheesecake in a water bath, tented with foil. Bake for about 45 minutes, but check it after 30 minutes. It is done when the center is set and giggles like jell-o. Allow the cake to cool for 15 minutes, still sitting in the water bath.
Remove the pan from the water and foil.
To make the topping: Mix together the sour cream, sugar and vanilla. Spread the mixture over the top of the cheesecake and return to the oven for 10 minutes.
Before the cake cools, run a paring knife around the edge so that the cake can shrink away from the pan without cracking.

WATERMELON, NECTARINE & MINT COOLERS 

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Ingredients
4-5 cups seedless watermelon chunks
2 nectarines, peeled and cut into pieces
1 1/2 cups seltzer water or lemon-lime soda
1-2 tablespoons honey, to taste
fresh mint sprigs
Instructions
1. Place watermelon and nectarine chunks in blender and pulse until liquid.
2. Add 1 1/2 cups seltzer water or lemon-lime soda.
3. Stir in honey to taste. Pour over ice. Garnish with fresh mint and enjoy.

Cucumber and Mint Salad (http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/09/cucumber-and-mint-salad-recipe.html)

Ingredients
• 2 English (hothouse) cucumbers
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1/4 cup chopped red onions
• 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
• 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 2-1/2 teaspoons sugar
• 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
• 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint
Directions
Cut the cucumbers in half lengthwise. Use a teaspoon to scrape out the seeds, then cut into thin slices. Toss the cucumbers with the salt in a colander. Let drain in the sink for at least 30 minutes, then tap the colander on the base of the sink to release any remaining water. Lay a clean dish towel flat on the counter, and then dump the cucumbers over top. Use the edges of the towel to blot the cucumbers dry.
Meanwhile, soak the red onions in a small bowl of ice water for at least 10 minutes, then drain in a fine mesh strainer.
In a medium bowl, combine the cucumbers, onions, white wine vinegar, olive oil, vegetable oil, sugar, pepper and mint. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Cover and let stand in refrigerator for at least 20 minutes. Serve cold.

From the Mesa Top: July 27, 2017
Climatology 2017: After a good start a couple of weeks ago, for the last week the monsoons have largely skirted Mesa Top. We have had no measurable rain to speak of. This is the spotty nature of the monsoon rains. Other areas just a mile or two away have had more rain. Most pastures have stayed green some. Some more exposed spots are getting dry. Usually these vagueries even out.
From the Wild: There are thousands of tadpoles in the ponds. The spadefoot toads come up out of the deep damp soil and make their way to freshly filled ponds. Interestingly if a pond has had water over the winter and through the spring, that water does not entice the toads to mate and lay eggs. There has to be a big rain that soaks all of the ground for a substantial area. We have unearthed toads dug into the garden, 6 to 8 inches underground. The best we can do then is to move them to a pond that still has water.’
Sometimes the ponds that have been populated with the tadpoles dry up. As they empty the tadpoles have nowhere to go and the ravens and other birds swoop in and feast on them.
If they mature to the point of baby toads, they hop out in fall, during cooler though not necessarily wet weather, looking for their first winter hibernation area of deep, cool, damp soil.
Cow stories: The rains caught up at the Forest Trust land. Just in time! Several vigorous storms over a 5 day period delivered plenty of precipitation, and sunny days followed.
The day before the lucky rains, the older cows had started complaining. They are the “bell cows” in regard to the pasture conditions because as the cows age and their teeth wear down, they have a harder time grazing shorter grass. When the forage becomes scarce they gather at the water tanks, or even at the gate where they have previously come and gone from the pasture that they are in, and wait to be taken care of.
In this case the rain came right in on them while they were waiting at the gate. They were satisfied and wandered off. Even the new growth was not instantaneous, the greening up was of the grasses was almost so.
It looks like we are good for another week at Forest Trust and maybe more if the rains continue to favor that spot.
Checking around at the other pastures, a good week or two at any of them would set us up for the next rotation.
Garden Stories: The Mesa Top specialty, zukes and cukes, are producing in abundance.
Beneficial birds: The cooling off that accompanies summer rainy season is welcomed by the birds. Cooler overall and less of the day in full sun. This is favorable to the birds.,
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of July 20th, 2017

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share

for Thursday July 20th, 2017

Peaches from Rancho de Santa Fe
Plums from Rancho de Santa Fe
Beets from Frisco Farm
Chard from Owl Peak Farm
Green Tomatoes from Vida Verde Farm
Zucchini from Mesa Top Farm

Peaking of Produce Season
We are having a lot of fun behind the scenes in the local agricultural world, with things starting to hit peak season!
At MT farm, we are up to our ear in zucchini, with cucumbers coming along close on their heels. Owl Peak farm is producing over 100 lbs. of kale each week, in addition to their other crops! Frisco and Jubliee Farm (normally our fall partners) have an abundance of crops, which we are working into shares. Otter and Vida Verde Farm are both slowing down a tad after an intense spring planting, to get the fields ready for fall crops. Preferred Produce is turning over their beds, and planning with us for supplying the SF School District this year! We are also working with a few new farmers this season, to ensure we have a full local harvest!
Our support from local restaurants is also growing, as we expand to offer Farm to Restaurant connections, to aid our farmer’s in finding markets for their crops. For a full list of restaurant partners see our website:

Beneficial Restaurant Partners 

Double Up Bucks CSA!
We are happy to share with you that Beneficial Farms is the first CSA in NM to be a part of the Double Up Bucks program, we are now able to offer members on EBT their CSA shares for half off!
Please help us spread the word, we are looking forward to helping get locally grown, healthy food to the families in our community that need it the most.

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Kale: Green Curly, Dino: On the marketplace
Peaches: On the marketplace
Plums: On the marketplace
Mini Cucumbers: On the marketplace
Collards: On the marketplace
Herbs, Lemon Balm, Spearmint, Peppermint, Tarragon, Sage: On the marketplace
Green Tomatoes: On the marketplace
Rainbow and Orange Carrots: On the marketplace
Beets: On the marketplace
Breakfast Radishes: On the marketplace
Zucchini: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

ZUCCHINI PEACH BREAD 

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Ingredients
3 large eggs
1 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 1/2 cups grated zucchini
1 cup finely diced peaches
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon table salt
3/4 cup chopped toasted walnuts
1/4 cup demerara sugar (or other coarse sanding sugar)
Preheat oven to 350°F.
Directions:
Liberally butter and flour two 8×4-inch loaf pans. Alternately, line 24 muffin cups with paper liners.
In a large bowl whisk together the eggs, oil, vanilla and sugar. Add zucchini and peaches and stir to combine.
Combine flours, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and walnuts. Whisk to combine. Make a well in the center of the flour and pour egg mixture in. Gently fold and stir just to combine. Do not over mix. Divide the batter into prepared pans and sprinkle each with demerara sugar.
Bake loaves for 60 minutes, plus or minus ten, or until a toothpick or cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. If making muffins instead, they should bake for approximately 20 to 25 minutes. Cool on a wire rack for about 15 minutes before removing from pans, and cool for at least 30 minutes more before slicing.

French “Peasant” Beets 
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• 4-6 Beets with greens
• 1 bunch Swiss chard
• 3 tablespoons butter
• 1 shallot
• Salt
• Freshly Ground Pepper
• 2 tablespoons white wine (Muscadet is my preference)
• 2 tablespoons water
• .5 pounds Bucheron Cheese (room temperature)
• Crusty peasant style bread (warmed in oven
Directions:
1. Scrub and peel the beets. Remove the greens and chop coarsely. Set the greens aside in a large prep bowl. Slice beets into 1/4-inch rounds.
2. Remove the ribs from the swiss chard and coarsely chop and toss into bowl with the beet greens,
3. In a large sautee pan, melt butter. Sautee shallots.
4. Add beet rounds to the shallot butter mixture. Crack some pepper over the beets and a toss on a pinch of salt. Reduce heat and sautee beets, turning over to ensure even cooking.
5. About 15 minutes later when beets are beginning to glaze and become tender, add greens and chard. Sautee for about 5 minutes, then add wine and cover. Cook until greens are wilted, adding water if necessary. Allow liquid to be mostly absorbed into greens, adjust seasonings.
6. Scoop greens and beets into a low shallow bowl. Garnish with a sizeable wedge of bucheron and some crusty bread. Crack a little bit of pepper over the entire dish.

Blackened Salmon with Cheesy Polenta and Spicy Peach + Chard Corn Salsa 
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Ingredients
Blackened Salmon
• 1-pound fresh salmon
• 1 tablespoon olive oil
• 1/4 cup brown sugar
• 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
• 1/4 teaspoon to 1/2 cayenne
• 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
• 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
• 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
• 1 teaspoon kosher salt
• 1 teaspoon pepper
Spicy Peach + Charred Corn Salsa
• 1 ear grilled corn
• 1 red pepper charred
• 1 jalapeno pepper seeded and diced
• 1 peach diced
• 4 leaves basil chopped
• 1 lime juiced
• 3 green onions
• 1 teaspoon hot sauce
Cheesy Polenta
• 2 cups chicken broth
• 2 cups milk
• 2/3 cup polenta
• 1/2 cup sharp cheddar cheese
• 1/4 teaspoon salt
• 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Instructions
1. Make the polenta. Pour the chicken broth and milk into a medium size saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to medium and slowly whisk in the polenta. Cook, stirring frequently, until the polenta is soft and thick, about 15 to 20 minutes. Keep warm and then just before serving, stir in the cheddar cheese and season with salt and pepper. If the polenta seems a little thick you can add a tablespoon of butter or extra milk.
2. While the polenta is cooking work on the salsa and salmon. Preheat your grill to high heat (you can also roast the corn and peppers in the oven, but I prefer the grill). In a small bowl combine the brown sugar, smoked paprika, cayenne, garlic powder, basil, thyme, salt and pepper. Rub the salmon with a tablespoon of olive oil and then cover with the blackened seasoning. Leave about 1 or 2 teaspoons of the seasoning for the salsa. Place the salmon in fridge.
3. Rub the corn and red pepper with a little olive oil. Wrap the corn in a small piece of foil and grill the corn + red pepper for about 25 minutes turning each veggie about three times. Remove and let cool. When cool, slice off the corn kernels, de-seed and chop the pepper and place both in a medium size bowl. Add the chopped peach, chopped jalapeño pepper, basil, lime juice, green onions, hot sauce and 1 to 2 teaspoons of the blackened seasoning. Toss well and set aside.
4. Remove the salmon from the fridge and grill (or broil, whatever you prefer) for 3 to 4 minutes, flip and cook another 2 to 3 minutes.
5. Serve the salmon over the cheesy polenta and top with the salsa.

Beet Lemonade 

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makes about 8 cups

3/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2/3 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup finely grated raw beet*
6 cups filtered water, divided

*I used the fine grating side of a box grater to shred a small, raw, unpeeled beet. You can also use a food processor with the shredder attachment, but I found the box grater to be much easier.
In a blender or a food processor (fitted with the blade attachment), blend together lemon juice, sugar, shredded beet, and 1 cup of water. Blend for 1 minute until the mixture is bright pink and well combined. The beets will never be fully smooth, that’s ok!
Strain mixture through a fine mesh strainer and into a medium bowl. Use the back of a spoon to press any remaining juice out of the beets and into the lemonade. Transfer strained mixture to a pitcher and discard the beets. Add remaining 5 cups of water to the pitcher and stir. Taste and add more lemon or sugar as necessary. Store in the refrigerator and serve chilled.

Parmesan-Crusted Green Tomato Gratin 

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Ingredients
• 1/4 lb. bacon, chopped
• 1 large red onion, thinly sliced
• 5 Tbs. freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
• 5 Tbs. breadcrumbs
• 1 Tbs. vegetable oil
• 4 green tomatoes (about 1/2 lb. each), sliced 1/4 inch thick
• 3/4 tsp. kosher salt
• Freshly ground black pepper to taste
• 1 Tbs. fresh thyme leaves
Preparation
• Lightly brown the bacon in a skillet over medium heat, about 4 minutes. Pour off all but 2 Tbs. of the fat. Add the onion and cook over low heat until caramelized, about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, combine the Parmigiano-Reggiano, breadcrumbs, and oil and set aside.
• Heat the oven to 350°F. On one side of a round or oval shallow baking dish, arrange 4 or 5 tomato slices, overlapping them slightly. Spoon some of the bacon-onion mixture on the lower half of each tomato slice, and then lay another row of tomatoes across the first row. Layer the tomatoes at a slight angle against one another, topping each slice with the bacon-onion mixture. Repeat until the dish is full. Sprinkle with the salt, pepper, fresh thyme, and the Parmigiano-breadcrumb mixture.

Stuffed Pork Chop Recipe with Chard, Cherries and Plum Balsamic Glaze 

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Ingredients
Brine
1/2 cup kosher salt
2 tablespoon white sugar
2 tablespoon dark brown sugar
1 quarts water
4 thick cut (2” thick) bone-in pork chops
Stuffing
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
2 cups cubed (1/2 inch) crusty bread
2 bunch (about 1 1/2 lb) rainbow chard
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup (1/2 large or 1 small) onion, chopped
1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary
1/4 cup dried cherries
1/2 cup chicken stock
salt and pepper to taste
Plum Balsamic Glaze
2 medium firm red plums
2 tablespoon dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon honey
1/2 cup dry red wine
2 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
Directions
1. Make the brine by combining the salt, sugars and water together in a large 2 1/2 gallon ziplock bag. Put the pork chops in the bag and seal it tightly. Place in the refrigerate and let brine for 1-2 hours.
2. While the pork chops are brining, make the stuffing by putting 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large oven proof skillet. Heat until the oil shimmers and then add the bread cubes. Sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt and pepper and sauté over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the cubes look golden brown. Remove from heat onto a medium sized bowl.
3. Wash the chard and remove the tough stem in the middle. Slice the stem into small 1/2 inch pieces, like you would chop celery. Slice the tender leaves of the chard into 1/2 inch thick ribbons. Add 1 more tablespoon of olive oil to the skillet and heat on medium until it shimmers. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the onion and the chopped chard stems and cook for 5 minutes, or until the onions start to soften and look transparent. Add the rosemary and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add 1 1/2 cup packed chard leaves and wilt them in the pan with the other ingredients, another 30 seconds. Add the dried cherries, the toasted bread cubes and the chicken stock. Cook until the chicken stock is absorbed. Add more salt and pepper to taste. Remove from heat and pour into the bowl that held the toasted bread cubes.
4. Preheat the oven to 350˚F. Once the pork chops are brined, remove them and dry with paper towels. Slice a pocket into the meaty side of the pork chop all the way to the bone. Fill each pocket with 1/4 of the prepared stuffing and “seal” each pork chop with toothpicks. Sprinkle each side of the pork chop with salt and pepper. Pour the final tablespoon of olive oil into the skillet and heat until the oil shimmers. Place each pork chop in the pan on medium high heat and brown each side for 5 minutes or until the side of the pork is golden brown. Move the pan to the oven and continue to cook it there, 25-30 minutes or until the juices run clear when the pork chop is pierced with a sharp knife.
5. While the pork chops are in the oven, make the plum balsamic glaze by chopping the plums into 1/2 cubes. Add them to a sauté pan along with the brown sugar and honey. Cook until the fruit starts to disintegrate completely, about 7-8 minutes on medium high heat. Add the wine and balsamic vinegar and cook until it thickens a bit more, about 2 -3 minutes more. Once done, place aside until pork chops are ready.
6. When the pork chops are done, put them on individual plates for service, let them sit for 5 minutes then remove the toothpicks. Meanwhile, deglaze the skillet by adding 2 tablespoons of water (or chicken stock), heating the pan on the stove and loosening all the caramelized bits from bottom of it. Once loosened, add the remaining chopped chard leaves and wilt for a minute or two on medium heat. Serve with the pork chop, with the plum balsamic glaze on the side or drizzled over the pork chop.

Golden-Doodle Pups!
We always have some baby animals running around the farm, and it should be no surprise to members that we have another litter of puppies, 2 in fact!
Kim’s Bernese Mountain Dog Aureole, lovingly referred to as Butt, had a litter of 8 pups a few weeks ago. If anyone is interested in them, they can find out more about them at:

Mesa Top Bernese 

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Word has been spreading throughout Santa Fe about our Golden-Doodles, we have had families waiting since January for our next litter!
We only have 2 puppies still looking for families, a boy and a girl.

If you or someone you know would be interested in more information about these gorgeous pups, contact Colleen Warshawer,

C -505-470-9686
cwarshawer@plateautel.net

From the Mesa Top: July 20, 2017
Climatology 2017: Now we are pretty well settled into the monsoon pattern. At Mesa Top we have had a couple of hard, gully washer rains, that fill some ponds and got the spadefoot toads out and moving. And also several gentler, longer duration rains. Grass is greening up. The edgy feeling that comes from heat and dust and
From the Wild: The wildlife is coming out into the open more as the weather changes to less extreme conditions. A fox was spotted crossing the road during the daytime, which is very unusual. A coyote was standing by the roadside eating juniper berries and he just loped along almost following the car and then crossed the road in no hurry, heading for a nearby pond.
The heavy rains brought out the toads, and we had a few nights of serenading by the males and females calling each other.
The swallows nests have emptied, the spring hatchlings have matured and now fly with the flock. There are dozens, maybe over a hundred swallows taking advantage of the standing water and the bugs that it attracts.
Cow stories: We are hoping for some speedy grass growth up at the Forest Trust land so that we can extend the stay of the herd until end of July at least. We may have to go to the arduous process of moving the herd from pasture to pasture every week to 10 days to allow the most growth on all the pastures during the next couple of months.
We will spend time over the next week monitoring the response of the grasses to the recent favorable
Garden Stories: The weeds around the garden are loving the rain, as are the vegetables. Lots of green growth to take care of
Beneficial birds: A major cleanup of the yards is complete and now the birds have fresh dust to bath in (when the ground dries out) and dirt to dig in, looking for worms and insects.
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of July 6th, 2017

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday July 6th, 2017

Cherries from Mountain Park, NM
Beets, Red/White Mix from Owl Peak Farm
Red Russian Kale from Owl Peak Farm
Vine Tomatoes from Preferred Produce
Cucumber from Preferred Produce
Cantaloupe from Preferred Produce

Spice Share for July
Spices from Coast to Coast
This month join us on our flavor journey, as we enjoy spices from the East Coast, Gulf Coast and West Coast!
Coastal Bay Seasoning – Works very well with crab and other seafood, but also with potato salad, pasta or chicken!
Native Texan BBQ Rub – As you would expect, it is great for BBQing just about any meat, but you can try sprinkling it on vegetables or making some peachy BBQ beans!
California Citrus Rub – Great for rubbing on chicken or pork, or making a marinade, or even vinaigrette!

Double Up Bucks CSA!
We are happy to share with you that Beneficial Farms is the first CSA in NM to be a part of the Double Up Bucks program, where we are now able to offer members on EBT their CSA shares for half off!
Please help us spread the word, we are looking forward to helping get locally grown, healthy food to the families in our community that need it the most.

Exciting Behind-The-Scene News!
One of the things that takes up a lot of time and energy is driving, especially for business that distribute between NM’s too main cities. While a lot of modern advances have been made in fuel consumption for vehicles, most of this has been to the benefit of smaller personal vehicles, not the large vehicles that transport thousands of pounds of goods at time. As a business that has a customer base in ABQ, we are regularly driving that 65 miles down from Santa Fe, even going to pick up produce from our farmers who can’t bring it up themselves.
A recent discussion between a few local businesses has taken the fast track to helping tackle this issue. Every week, multiple producers and farmers are driving back and forth between ABQ and Santa Fe, to reach more markets. This costs us all time, money and most importantly leaves a carbon footprint that we want to make a resolution to decrease.
Beneficial Farms, The Kombucha Project, MoGro, Vida Verde Farm and Zia Soda have started a project aimed at small businesses helping each-other’s distribution work, and coordinating this in a way to drastically decrease our collective carbon footprint! We are working on our official, catchy name, but this is a grower’s/producer’s cooperative distribution network.
Using the refrigerated truck owned by The Kombucha Project, we have developed our first phase of coordinating our collective needs. MoGro will drive the truck up with their deliveries from ABQ to SF, including Beneficial and Vida Verde’s produce, leaving the truck in SF. Beneficial will drive the truck back to ABQ 2 days later, with The Kombucha Projects delivers. The drivers will return to their city via the train. Collectively we are starting off by eliminating around 400 miles a week our companies are not burning fossil fuels on!!
As our idea takes more shape, we will be coordinating with more farmers and local producers to maximize these trips. We are organizing refrigerated storage in both cities, where these aggregations will happen. Long term, we are hoping to have enough people working together to make the costs much lower than we could do individually, and continue to decrease the carbon foot print of our business as much as we can!

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Kale: Green Curly, Red Russian: On the marketplace
Rainbow Carrots: On the marketplace
Beets: On the marketplace
Salad Mix: On the marketplace
Breakfast Radishes: On the marketplace
Summer Squash: On the marketplace
Zucchini: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

ROASTED BEET BALSAMIC MUSTARD 

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Ingredients:
2 Tablespoons Yellow Mustard Seeds
2 Teaspoons Brown Mustard Seeds
2 Tablespoons plus 2 Teaspoons Balsamic Vinegar
2 Tablespoons plus 1 and 1/2 Teaspoons Water
1 Beet, cleaned, peeled, and cut into quarters
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
1/2 Teaspoon Sea Salt
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
1/4 Teaspoon Brown Sugar

Directions:
In a sterilized 4-ounce canning jar, mix together the yellow mustard seeds, brown mustard seeds, balsamic vinegar, and water. Cover and allow to sit at room temperature for 2 days
Toss the beet quarters with the pepper, olive oil, and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt and roast at 375 degrees for 35 minutes on a baking sheet lined with tin foil.

In a blender or food processor, blend one of the beet quarters with the mustard, brown sugar, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon of salt until pureed but still slightly coarse.
Use within 1 month. Makes about 4 Ounces (1/2 Cup) mustard.

Russian Kale Casserole Recipe 

red-russian-kale-casserole

1 bunch Red Russian Kale, chopped, or use any other variety of kale
1/2 red onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced (1/2 tsp. teaspoon minced garlic)
1/2 tsp. olive oil
1 tsp. Tamari or other soy sauce
1 C grated cheese (I used a blend of low-fat cheese called Pizza Cheese which has mozzarella, provolone, Romano, and parmesan)
1/4 cup 100% whole wheat bread crumbs (optional; I’ve made this successfully without the bread crumbs)
6 eggs, beaten well
1/2 tsp. Spike Seasoning
Preheat oven to 350F. Cut off kale stems and discard, then wash kale leaves and dry well. (I used a salad spinner.) Pile kale leaves up on top of each other and cut into strips about 3/4-inch-wide, then turn cutting board the other way and cut again so you have squares just under an inch square. Chop onion into pieces about 1/2 inch.
Heat olive oil in large heavy frying pan, then add onions and sauté 3 minutes. Add garlic and sauté about 2 more minutes, then add kale, turning over as it wilts and sautéing about 5 minutes, or until kale is significantly wilted and softened. Put sautéed vegetables into large bowl and add Tamari, cheese, bread crumbs, beaten eggs, and Spike seasoning.
Stir gently until ingredients are well distributed. Spray pen with olive oil or nonstick spray and pour in egg mixture. (I was cooking it in my Oster Toaster Oven, and used a pan that’s 11.5 X 7.5 inches.) Bake 20-25 minutes until eggs are well set and the top is lightly browned. Serve hot. This is good with low-fat sour cream or salsa.

Beet-Colored Fresh Pasta 

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Ingredients
• For the Beet Purée:
• 2 small beets (approximately 7 ounces), rinsed and trimmed
• For the Dough:
• 10 ounces all-purpose flour
• 5 yolks from 5 large eggs
• 1 whole large egg
• 4 tablespoons beet purée (see note above)
• 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for salting water
Directions
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add rinsed and trimmed beets and cook until easily pierced with a fork, approximately 40-45 minutes. Drain and let cool. Peel beets and purée with a hand-blender or food processor until smooth.
To Make the Dough: On a large, clean work surface, pour flour in a mound. Make a well in the center about 4 inches wide. Pour whole egg, egg yolks, beet purée, and salt into well and, using a fork, beat thoroughly. When combined, gradually incorporate flour into the eggs until a wet, sticky dough has formed.
Using a bench knife, scrape excess dough from fork and fingers. Begin to fold additional flour into the dough with the bench knife, turning the dough roughly 45 degrees each time, until dough feels firm and dry, and can form a craggy-looking ball, 2 to 5 minutes.
Press the heel of your hand into the ball of dough, pushing forward and down. Rotate the ball 45 degrees and repeat. Continue until dough develops a smooth, elastic texture similar to a firm ball of Play-Doh. If dough feels too wet, add flour in 1 teaspoon increments. If dough feels too dry, add water slowly using a spray bottle.
Wrap ball of dough tightly in plastic wrap and rest on countertop for 30 minutes.
To Roll the Pasta: Meanwhile, place a sheet of parchment paper on a tray or cutting board and dust lightly with flour. Unwrap rested dough and cut into quarters. Set one quarter on work surface and re-wrap remaining dough. With a rolling pin, flatten the quarter of dough into an oblong shape about 1/2 inch thick.
Set pasta maker to widest setting and pass dough 3 times through the machine at this setting.
Place dough on a lightly floured work surface. Fold both ends in so that they meet at the center of the dough, and then fold the dough in half where the end points meet, trying not to incorporate too much air into the folds. Using rolling pin, flatten dough to 1/2-inch thick. Pass through the rollers 3 additional times.
Narrow the setting by 1 notch and repeat Step 8. Repeat once more (the dough should now have passed through the third widest setting). Continue passing the dough through the rollers, reducing the thickness by 1 setting each time until it reaches the desired thickness. It should now be very delicate and elastic to the touch, and slightly translucent.
Place rolled dough onto a work surface or baking sheet lightly dusted with flour or lined with parchment paper, folding the dough over as necessary so that it fits; sprinkle with flour or line with parchment between folds to prevent sticking.
Cover dough with plastic wrap or a kitchen towel to prevent drying, then repeat Steps 6 through 10 with remaining dough quarters. If making noodles, cut dough into 12- to 14-inch segments.
To Cut Noodles: Adjust pasta machine to noodle setting of your choice. Working one dough segment at a time, feed dough through the pasta-cutter. Alternatively, cut folded dough by hand with a chef’s knife to desired noodle width.
Divide the cut noodles into individual portions, dust lightly with flour, and curl into a nest. Place on parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet and gently cover with kitchen towel until ready to cook. Pasta can be frozen directly on the baking sheet, transferred to a zipper-lock freezer bag, and stored in the freezer for up to three weeks before cooking. Cook frozen pasta directly from the freezer.
To Cook: Bring a large pot of salted water to a rolling boil. Add pasta, stir gently with a wooden spoon, chopsticks, or a cooking fork, and cook, tasting at regular intervals until noodles are just set with a definite bite, about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes. Drain, toss with sauce, and serve.

Cantaloupe Sorbet 

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Adapted from Chez Panisse Desserts
 3 pounds ripe sweet cantaloupes
 7/8 cup sugar
Scoop out the seeds of the sliced melons, being careful not to cut too close to the rind. Purée in a blender and measure out four cups.
Put one cup of the purée in a saucepan with the sugar and heat until the sugar is dissolved. Stir constantly.
Pour this mixture into the remaining melon puree and chill. I let mine chill for a few hours and transferred to the freezer about 15 minutes before I was ready to finish in the ice cream maker. Freeze according to your ice cream maker instructions.

Beetroot & Feta Burger 

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Makes 4 burgers:
150g Chickpeas
145g Beetroot (120g when peeled)
80g Breadcrumbs
1 Egg
1/2 Red Onion finely chopped
1 tablespoon Curry Paste (I used Rogan Josh paste)
65g Feta Cheese
Mash the chickpeas in a bowl until broken down but don’t mash them until smooth! Grate the beetroot into the bowl (this is a messy part as fingers and worktops begin to turn pink!) and add the finely sliced red onion, the breadcrumbs, the egg and the curry paste. Stir all these ingredients together to combine.
Crumble the feta into the bowl in quite large chunks and gently fold the cheese into the mixture.
Mold the mixture into 4 patties and then put them on a plate in the fridge for at least 20-30 minutes. This will firm them up before cooking.
In a pan heat some oil (use spray oil if being healthy) and then fry the burgers for about 3-4 minutes on each side. Serve with a burger bun and salad…and even some chips yum!

From the Mesa Top: July 6, 2017
Climatology 2017: After a few more days of intense dangerous stormy weather last week, we are moving into typical monsoon pattern. We had baby hail mixed into hard rains two days in a row. Now we have daytime heat giving way to afternoon clouds which should build up as the monsoon gathers steam into afternoon showers.
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From the Wild: SO many wildlife sightings occur along the roads: late last week while on a drive around to see how the far reaches of our pasture fared during the recent rains and hail, a roadrunner crossed up ahead. This afternoon a magnificent rattlesnake was stretched out across another section of road: 6 to 7 feet long. This one was within a few hundred yards of the spot where a snake that size, caught near a farm building, was carried up to a rocky area in a big barrel (safely contained).
Cow stories: The unified herd has the run of the forest trust acreage and is looking fantastic. Smooth shiny coats. Round bodies without protruding ribs or hip bones. These cows are in excellent condition.
Garden Stories: Zukes coming in now in abundance. All of the plants took a bit of a beating with hail on 3 successive days. The leaves were tattered and some immature fruit got beaten up a bit.
But as often happens with hail the plants are coming back with renewed vigor. The tattered leaves still provide enough photosynthesis to support the nest leaves which grow our quickly with the extra jolt of deep soaking of water that comes with the hail.
Finally, we have the new covering on the greenhouse. It is all for the best that it took us thin long to get it installed, as last week the intense and large hail would probably have shredded the covering even though it was new.
Now the greenhouse is ready to use
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And Colleen and Kim were out in the field this evening, planting our lettuce for salad mix!
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Beneficial birds: We are well into the summer pattern where the birds get out and are very active during the first few hours of the morning, then they hide out in the shade until the afternoon clouds come in and then they are active again.
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of June 29nd, 2017

Check out the Webstore:

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday June 29nd, 2017

Tropea Onions from Vida Verde
Rainbow Carrots from Vida Verde
Green Garlic from Jubilee Farm
Zucchini from Mesa Top Farm
Apricots from Otter Farm
Romaine Lettuce from Preferred Produce

We had a wonderful time at the Fermentation Festival this weekend, even with the muggy hot weather, our booth was full with people interested in our CSA almost every minute of the day! Through all of our preparation and discussion leading up to this event, we have made a great friendship with the Kombucha Project, which we will be carrying for our members here in the coming week! We also connected with a few other fine fermented food companies that we look forward to adding to the CSA in the future!

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Double Up Bucks CSA!
We are happy to share with you that Beneficial Farms is the first CSA in NM to be a part of the Double Up Bucks program, where we are now able to offer members on EBT their CSA shares for half off!
Please help us spread the word, we are looking forward to helping get locally grown, healthy food to the families in our community that need it the most.

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Kale: Green Curly, Dino: On the marketplace
Red Leaf Lettuce: On the marketplace
Rainbow and Baby Orange Carrots: On the marketplace
Chard: On the marketplace
Sage: On the marketplace
Tarragon: On the marketplace
Lemon Balm: On the marketplace
Tiara Cabbage: On the marketplace
Diakon Radish: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Fresh Peas with Lettuce and Green Garlic 

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Ingredients
• 4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature
• 5 small stalks green garlic, any tough parts trimmed, sliced into very thin rounds
• Kosher salt
• 1½ cups fresh or frozen shelled green peas
• 2 small heads of butter lettuce, washed and torn into pieces
• Freshly ground black pepper
Directions

Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in a medium sauté pan over low heat. Add the green garlic and a pinch of salt. Cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, for 2 to 3 minutes, until the garlic is tender and fragrant but with no color. Add the peas and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, until they are tender and sweet. Stir in the lettuce and the remaining 2 tablespoons butter; add 1 tablespoon water if the mixture seems dry. Remove the pan from the heat and toss gently until the lettuce wilts and the butter melts. Season with fresh pepper and additional salt if needed.

Grilled Turkish apricot and goats cheese salad with crispy bacon img_5145
I cut the soft and semi dried Turkish apricots into strips. I chopped up a couple of rashers of dry cured and smoked streaky bacon (about 2 slices per portion) and pan fried them until crispy. I removed them from the pan and added the apricot slices to the pan and quickly fried until they just started to blister. It is not totally necessary to do this, you could just leave use them as is, but I wanted to warm and soften them slightly, and allow them to absorb the delicious bacon fat.
Scatter the apricots and bacon over a bed of leaves of your preference and add small chunks of goats cheese. Drizzle over a vinaigrette dressing.
Yum!

Rainbow power salad with roasted chickpeas 

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INGREDIENTS
• 5 Minute Magic Green Sauce for dressing
• 3 large tri-color carrots (I used one orange, one red, and one yellow)
• 1 medium zucchini
• ¼ cup fresh basil, cut into ribbons
• 1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
• 1 tablespoon olive oil
• 1 teaspoon chili powder
• ½ teaspoon cumin
• generous sprinkling of salt and pepper
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Pat the chickpeas dry with paper towels and toss with the olive oil, chili powder, cumin, and salt and pepper. Arrange in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake for 30-40 minutes, stirring or shaking the pan every once in a while to prevent over browning. The chickpeas are done when they are crispy and golden brown.
2. Shred the vegetables into very thin ribbons or slices using a grater, peeler, mandoline, or spiralizer. It’s sort of up to you how you want the shape of the vegetables to be. After shreddng, press the zucchini lightly with paper towels to remove excess moisture. Toss the vegetables with the basil and set aside.
3. Toss the vegetables with a scoop of Magic Green Sauce – start out with about ½ cup and add more if needed. Add the roasted chickpeas and toss gently to combine. Arrange the salad into bowls and serve immediately.

Alice Waters’ Spaghetti with Green Garlic 

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Ingredients
• Salt
• 1 pound spaghetti
• 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
• 3 heads green garlic (or 4 cloves regular garlic), thinly sliced
• 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
• small pinch of red pepper flakes
Directions
Bring a large pot of salted water to boil and add the spaghetti. Cook until al dente, reserving 1 cup of pasta cooking water before draining.
Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large (3-quart) saucepan over medium heat until shimming. Add the garlic, parsley, red pepper flakes, and 1/4 cup of water. Cover and sweat, stirring occasionally, until soft, adding more water if necessary to keep the garlic from caramelizing too much.
Add the cooked pasta to the garlic mixture and toss well to combine. Add some pasta cooking water if necessary to bring the dish to a creamy consistency. Serve with more olive oil and the minced tops of the green garlic, if desired.

Apricot Shrub Recipe for Homemade Soda 

apricot-shrub-recipe-8
Ingredients
• 2 cups apricots, halved and pitted
• 1 pint vinegar
• 1 1/2- 2 cups sugar
Instructions
Sterilize the jar or container you will store the shrub syrup in:
1. Wash the container in hot, soapy water and rinse thoroughly. Submerge in a pot of warm water to cover by 1 to 2 inches, bring to a boil, and boil for 10 minutes. For the lid or cap, wash it in hot, soapy water, rinse well, and scald in boiling water.
Add the fruit:
2. Carefully remove the jar from the pot using canning jar lifters or tongs. Place the fruit in the jar.
Heat the vinegar:
3. Place the vinegar in a saucepan and heat to just below the boiling point, or at least 190°F. Pour the vinegar over the fruit, leaving at least 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe the rim with a clean, damp cloth, and cap tightly.
Let it stand:
4. Let the jar cool undisturbed and then store it in a cool, dark place such as a cupboard or the refrigerator. Let it stand at least 24 hours and up to 4 weeks until the desired flavor is reached.
Strain it:
5. Strain it through a damp cheesecloth or coffee filter one or more times until the vinegar shows no cloudiness. Discard the fruit or save it for another purpose (it’s often delicious for use in chutneys).
Add the sugar:
6. Place the vinegar and sugar in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve sugar. Remove from heat and let cool. Pour into a clean, sterilized container (use the original mason jar or other bottles; see step 1 for sterilization procedure) and cap tightly.
Store:
7. Store the shrub syrup in the refrigerator. Tightly sealed, it may last for up to 6 months. Taste before using to make sure the flavor is still good. Discard immediately if it has mold or any signs of fermentation such as bubbling, cloudiness, or sliminess.
Serve:
8. To serve, mix 1 tablespoon shrub syrup into a glass of still or sparkling water. Taste and add more syrup, if desired. Shrub syrups may also be used as cocktail mixers, in salad dressings, and more.

From the Mesa Top: June 29, 2017
Climatology 2017: Cool and moist are moved in behind a cold front on Friday. Temperatures dropped 10 to 15 degrees. Afternoons clouded up and by early evening storms were rolling around. The storms included some enormous hail:
Vehicles that were out in the open are pock marked. Trees look like they were shedding, there is so much leaf and needle underneath them
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From the Wild: Driving back toward the mesa late last Friday night, a red fox was seen crossing the road by Galisteo Creek. Then a few miles later another one was seen crossing the ASSRA Road, near our state lease.
Red fox are rare, two sitings in a row is very surprising
Cow stories: The big move up to Forest Trust land is done. All together we moved 29 mother cows, 12 baby calfs, a month of age or less, 7 nursing but older calfs, 2 full grown weaned steers, and 3 bulls.
We took 6 steers to the sale barn and we got schooled: we did not realize that they buyers were sitting around looking for stick that had no owners present. It turns out that at the sale barn you are supposed to stay and watch your cattle come into the ring and if the prices offered are not satisfactory, you can reject the bid and take them home.
We have had several other sale barn experiences that were not adversarial at all. We did not know how these buyers operated, so we went home.
The winning bids for our cattle were appallingly low. But it’s all totally legal! The buyers are under no obligation to do anything but bid what they want, and the seller has to protect themselves, or suffer the consequences.
The system IS designed to give as few advantages and as many challenges as possible to the small guy…
From the garden: Lots of weeding in the garden. Zukes coming in now in abundance.
Beneficial birds: Chickens suffer in the heat, likely leading to some reduction in production. The cooler weather and especially the cloudy afternoons are a relief for them.
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of June 22nd, 2017

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday June 22nd, 2017

Toscano Kale from Owl Peak Farm
Fennel from Otter Farm
Diakon Radish from Vida Verde
Org Green Cabbage from Silverleaf Farm
Fresh Sage & Tarragon from Vida Verde
Baby Leeks from Vida Verde

Time to get your Fermentation On!!  Join us this weekend in Albuquerque for the New Mexico Fermentation Festival, from 11am – 5:30pm at the Gutiérrez-Hubbell House!

newmexicofermentationfestival

The process of fermentation preserves foods and creates enzymes and probiotics that are beneficial to consumers. The New Mexico Fermentation Festival is the only festival of its kind in the Southwest. This all-day event will feature nine different fermentation workshops, including hands-on workshops, lectures, and tutorials. This year, Sandor Ellix Katz, a James Beard Award winner and author of multiple fermentation books, will be the featured presenter for VIP guests.
The festival is an educational event that celebrates all things fermented in Central Northern New Mexico. It aims to educate the public on the growing trend of preserving and enjoying fresh foods through fermentation.
The day will include a series of fermentation workshops, covering topics such as chocolate, kombucha, fermented cocktails, hot sauces, fermented cheese and more; chef demos; a kraut mob; a culture swap; fermented foods and product vendors; museum tours, book sales; festival-inspired lunch for purchase from local food trucks; fermented beverages, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic; bike valet; live music; and more.
Proceeds from this event will benefit the The Hubbell House Alliance, a nonprofit dedicated to educating the public about, promoting interest in and advocating for the Gutiérrez-Hubbell House History and Cultural Center.

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Kale: White Russian, Red Curly, Green Curly, Red Russian: On the marketplace
Red Leaf Lettuce: On the marketplace
Apricots: On the marketplace
Rainbow and Baby Orange Carrots: On the marketplace
Spring Onions: On the marketplace
Fennel: On the marketplace
Chard: On the marketplace
Org Green Cabbage: On the marketplace
Purple Sage: On the marketplace
Tarragon: On the marketplace
Lemon Balm: On the marketplace
Savoy Cabbage: On the marketplace
Mustard Greens: On the marketplace
Diakon Radish: On the marketplace
Pac Choy: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Fennel al Forno 

11fennel-articlelarge

INGREDIENTS
• 4 medium fennel bulbs, about 2 1/2 pounds, topped, a few green fronds reserved
• Salt and pepper
• 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more to oil the baking pan
• ½ teaspoon fennel seed, crushed or roughly powdered in a mortar or spice mill
• 3 garlic cloves
• ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes
• ½ teaspoon chopped rosemary
• ½ pound fresh mozzarella, sliced or shredded
• 2 teaspoons rosemary leaves
• ¼ cup coarse dry homemade bread crumbs from an Italian or French loaf
• ½ cup grated Parmesan (about 1 1/2 ounces)
• 2 tablespoons chopped parsley, or a mixture of parsley and fennel fronds
PREPARATION
Heat oven to 375 degrees. Remove a thin layer of the fennel bulbs’ tough exterior with a paring knife or sharp vegetable peeler. Cut the fennel crosswise into half-inch-thick slices. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Boil the fennel for 1 minute, then put it in a bowl of cold water, drain and pat dry. Season with salt and pepper. Lightly oil an oven-proof baking dish. Layer in the fennel to a depth of 1 1/2 inches (pushing down, if necessary).
In a small bowl, stir together 3 tablespoons olive oil, the fennel seed and the garlic, smashed to a paste with a little salt, the pepper flakes and the chopped rosemary. Drizzle 2 tablespoons of this mixture over the fennel. Sprinkle with the rosemary leaves. Cover with a layer of sliced or shredded mozzarella, then sprinkle with bread crumbs. Drizzle the remaining oil mixture, then sprinkle with Parmesan. (The dish may be prepared to this point several hours before baking.)
Bake, uncovered, for 20 to 25 minutes, until nicely browned. Garnish with the chopped parsley or a mixture of the parsley and fennel fronds.
Melted Savoy Cabbage with Herbs 

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Ingredients
• 2 tbsp. butter
• 1 tbsp. oil
• 1 small onion
• 1 head savoy cabbage
• ½ c. water
• ¼ tsp. salt
• 3 green onions
• 1 tbsp. finely chopped fresh tarragon leaves
• .13 tsp. pepper
Directions
1. Heat butter and oil on medium in 5-quart saucepot. Add onion; cook 3 minutes, stirring.
2. Stir in savoy cabbage, water, and salt. Reduce heat to medium-low.
3. Cover and cook 15 to 20 minutes or until cabbage is very tender, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat. Stir in green onions, fresh tarragon leaves, and pepper.
Summer Squash Salad With Goat Cheese, Fennel, and Dill Recipe 

20150701-squash-salad-vicky-wasik-1-thumb-1500xauto-424619

INGREDIENTS
• 1 pound small yellow summer squash, thinly sliced into rounds on a vegetable slicer
• 1 small fennel bulb, halved, cored, and thinly sliced lengthwise on a vegetable slicer
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
• 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, for dressing
• 2 teaspoons fresh juice from 1 lemon
• Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
• 3 ounces fresh goat cheese, crumbled
DIRECTIONS
In a large bowl, combine squash, fennel, dill, olive oil, and lemon juice and toss to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Add goat cheese, gently toss, and serve right away.
Zuppa Toscana {Creamy Potato & Kale Soup with Italian Sausage} 

img_0270
Yields: 6 servings
• 1 tablespoon olive oil
• 1 pound italian sausage
• ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes (or to taste)
• 3 cloves garlic, minced
• 1 onion, diced
• 4 cups chicken broth
• 3 small russet potatoes, thinly sliced
• 2 cups kale, finely chopped
• 1 cup heavy cream
• salt and pepper to taste

To a large pot over medium heat, add the olive oil. Brown the sausage until no longer pink. Add the red pepper flakes, garlic, and onion and cook, stirring often, until the onions a translucent and the garlic is fragrant, about 4 minutes. Add the chicken broth, potatoes, and kale. Bring the broth to a simmer, reduce the heat to medium-low, and cook until the potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes. Remove the soup from the heat, stir in the cream, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Ladle into soup bowls and serve.

BUCKWHEAT PENNE WITH CABBAGE, POTATOES & TALEGGIO 

buckwheat_pasta
INGREDIENTS
• 160 g potatoes, peeled & diced
• 140 g savoy cabbage, finely chopped
• 140 g buckwheat penne
• 20 g butter

• 1 clove garlic, crushed
• 4-5 fresh sage leaves, roughly chopped
• 100 g taleggio, cubed
• 50 g Parmesan/Grana Padano, finely grated
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Heat the oven to 180C/Gas 6.
2. Bring a large saucepan of salted water and to the boil. Add the potatoes and cabbage and simmer for 5 minutes.
3. Add the penne to the saucepan and simmer for the amount of time indicated on the packet (usually 10-12 minutes). Then drain and set aside.
4. Heat the butter in a frying pan over a medium heat. Once the butter is hot, add the garlic and sage and fry for 2-3 minutes until the garlic is just starting to turn golden. Then remove from the heat.
5. In an ovenproof dish, alternate layers of the hot pasta mixture with sprinklings of taleggio and Parmesan/Grana Padano.
6. Pour over the sage and garlic butter. Place the dish in the oven and bake for 3-4 minutes.
7. Spoon onto plates.

From the Mesa Top: June 22, 2017
Climatology 2017: The heat is on. Clouds are a welcome relief. A few rain drops even fell this afternoon
Record heat is in the forecast again for mid week, including 110 degrees in Roswell. A major cool down with possibility of rain by the weekend.
From the Wild: The frantic racing about of jack rabbits and cotton tailed rabbits is almost comical. During dry times the rabbits hang out by the road because there is usually a strip of green on both sides of the road. They zig zag and race around whenever anything, car, bicycle, person on foot.
Cow stories: 2 more calves were born. We sold a few steers at the livestock auction. We moved the 9 young heifers up to La Puebla and brought back half a dozen yearling heifers that are ready to breed and joined them with a group of mother cows here at farm headquarters.

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The last of the loud complaining mothers whose calves have been moved off are starting to calm down.
This weekend will be the big move to Forest Trust land
From the garden: One last round of planting:” later cucumbers, and lots of weeding in the garden!
Beneficial birds: Eggs a plenty, chickens a plenty. During the summer heat the chickens are very active early in the day, then they hide out and try to stay cool, then they are active again at the end of the day. We also provide shade and
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of June 8th, 2017

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday June 8th, 2017

Org Cucumber from Preferred Produce
Org Vine-Ripe Tomatoes from Preferred Produce
Org Zucchini from Preferred Produce
Diakon Radishes from Vida Verde
Mustard Greens from Owl Peak Farm
Head Lettuce from Owl Peak Farm
Red Russian Kale from Owl Peak Farm

Spice Share Launch
We are kicking off our new Spice Share this week!
The Spice Share for June 8th will have Zatar, Pickling Spices and Sweet Mama’s BBQ Chicken Rub!!!
The Zatar will be paired with Tomatoes in your share for a Jerusalem Tomato Salad.
The Pickling Spices will be part of a Quick Fridge Pickle recipe that uses the cucumber.
The Sweet Mama BBQ Rub goes very well on the zucchini that will also be the share, for some delicious grilled zucchini!
We highly encourage members to add the Spice Share to your account, but we do have a few extra available this week.

Puppies!
image1 (6)
As we finished up a long day of clearing out the chicken coop, our poodle Bell went into labor today around 6pm! She has given birth to 8 Golden-Doodles, all very healthy and happily nursing on mom. What a great way to finish a “shitty” day!

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Cilantro: On the marketplace
Kale, Dino: On the marketplace
Collards: On the marketplace
Cherries: On the marketplace
Kohlrabi: On the marketplace
Dandelion Greens: On the marketplace
Garlic Scapes: On the marketplace
Sage: On the marketplace
Tarragon: On the marketplace
Peppermint: On the marketplace
Napa Cabbage: On the marketplace
Mustard Greens: On the marketplace
Purple and Golden Turnips: On the marketplace
Diakon Radish: On the marketplace
Swiss Chard: On the marketplace
Bok Choy: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Mustard Green Flatbread with Charred-Tomato Vinaigrette 

051125046-01-mustard-greens-flatbread-recipe-main
Ingredients
• 2 plum tomatoes, cored and halved
• 1-1/2 Tbs. white wine or Champagne vinegar
• 1 medium clove garlic, peeled
• 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
• Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
• 1 lb. pizza dough, thawed if frozen
• Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon (optional)
• 5 oz. mustard greens, trimmed and coarsely chopped (about 5 cups)
Preparation
Position one rack 6 inches below the broiler and another at the bottom of the oven; heat the broiler on high.
Arrange 3 of the 4 tomato halves cut side down on a small rimmed baking sheet lined with aluminum foil and broil on the top rack until they’re blistered and charred, about 5 minutes. Turn the tomatoes over and broil until charred, about 4 minutes more. Let cool.
Finely dice the uncooked tomato half and set aside.
Put a large cookie sheet on the bottom rack and heat the oven to 500°F.
In a blender, pulse the charred tomatoes, including the skin, with the vinegar and garlic until coarsely chopped. With the motor running, slowly drizzle the oil through the hole in the lid. Transfer to a small bowl, season with 1 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. pepper, and set aside.
Put the pizza dough on a lightly floured surface. Using a bench knife, divide the dough into 2 equal pieces. Roll them into balls and set one aside, covered with a clean, damp kitchen towel. Using a floured rolling pin, roll the other ball into a 12- to 13-inch round and sprinkle with flaky sea salt or more kosher salt.
Using a peel, transfer the round to the cookie sheet in the oven. (Don’t worry if it buckles or wrinkles; this will make for a more interesting shape.)
Bake until the dough begins to bubble and brown underneath, about 2 minutes. Flip and bake until golden-brown around the edges and bubbly, about 2 more minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack. Repeat with the second ball of dough.
In a large bowl, toss the mustard greens and diced fresh tomato with enough of the vinaigrette to coat. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Divide the greens between the flatbreads, spreading to cover, and serve.
Chinese Braised Daikon Radish 

1610_braised-daikon-radish_004

INGREDIENTS
• 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
• 2 green onions, chopped
• 1 teaspoon minced ginger
• 450 grams (1 pound) ground meat (beef, pork, chicken, or turkey)
• 2 teaspoons Doubanjiang (Spicy Fermented Bean Paste)
• 1 Daikon radish (about 700 grams / 1 pound)
• 2 cups chicken stock (vegetable stock, or water)
• 1 tablespoon soy sauce
• (Optional) 1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine (or dry sherry)
• 1 tablespoon sugar
• 1/8 teaspoon five-spice powder (the homemade version works better)
• 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt or to taste
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Heat a medium-size dutch oven (or heavy duty pot) over medium heat until hot. Add a tablespoon of oil. Add green onion and ginger. Cook for a minute to release the flavor.
2. Add ground meat. Cook and stir until surface turns brown.
3. Add the doubanjiang. Cook and stir until the meat is evenly coated.
4. Add the radish. Cook and stir to mix well.
5. Add Shaoxing wine, chicken stock, soy sauce, sugar, and five spice powder. Cook over medium high heat until brought to a boil. Turn to medium low heat. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the radish turns tender. Add salt to taste.
6. Serve with steamed rice or by itself.

Kale and Roasted Red Pepper Frittata 

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INGREDIENTS (6)
• 12 large eggs
• 3/4 cup milk
• 1/2 cup blanched and coarsely chopped kale or chard, baby Asian greens or arugula
• 1/2 cup thinly sliced roasted red peppers (could also use steamed zucchini or yellow squash, or tomatoes)
• 1 cup shredded cheddar or pepper jack cheese
• Cooking oil or unsalted butter

INSTRUCTIONS
1. Combine the eggs and milk in a large bowl and whisk until smooth. Stir in the vegetables and half of the cheese.
2. Heat oil or butter over medium heat in a large nonstick, ovenproof frying pan. When the oil shimmers or the butter stops foaming, add the egg mixture to the pan, reduce the heat to medium low, and cover. Allow to cook, making sure there is no visible bubbling, until set.
3. Sprinkle the remaining cheese on top and cook until melted or, if desired, place the skillet under the broiler for a minute or two to brown the top.
4. Use a knife to loosen the sides of the frittata, turn onto a cutting board, and slice. Serve hot, or chill and serve cold.

Daikon Radish Chips 

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Ingredients
• Daikon radish, washed peeled and sliced thinly (my mandolin works nicely)
• 3T olive oil (do not overdo the oil or they will burn)
• Paprika
• Salt and pepper
Directions
• You want to cut your radish really quite thin and almost see through.
• You can cut your oven broiler on at this point and mix your ingredients
• tossing with your hands and lay on cookie sheets.
• You want to watch everything closely at this point because they cook really
• fast!
• These did have a hints of spicy radish which is flavor I certainly enjoy.

Indian-Style Mustard Greens 

201103-xl-indian-mustard-greens
INGREDIENTS
• 1 1/4 pounds mustard greens, stemmed, or broccoli rabe, trimmed and chopped
• 1/2 pound cleaned spinach
• 2 tablespoons cornmeal
• 6 garlic cloves, chopped
• 4 jalapeños, seeded and finely chopped
• One 2-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
• 2 red onions, finely chopped
• 1/4 cup vegetable oil
• Salt
HOW TO MAKE THIS RECIPE
1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the mustard greens and cook for 2 minutes. Add the spinach and cook for 30 seconds. Drain the greens, transfer to a food processor and puree. Sprinkle the cornmeal over the greens and pulse briefly to combine. Transfer the pureed greens to a bowl.
2. Add the garlic, jalapeno and ginger to the food processor and finely chop. Add the onions and finely chop.
3. In a large nonstick skillet, heat the oil. Add the garlic-onion mixture and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 7 minutes. Add the pureed greens and cook for 4 minutes, stirring occasionally; add about 1/4 cup of water if the greens look dry. Season with salt and serve.
Creamed Kale Recipe 

creamed-kale31
• 12 cups roughly chopped kale
• 2 tablespoons butter
• 1 teaspoon sugar
• salt and freshly ground pepper
• 1 tablespoon flour
• 1 cup milk
• 1/4 cup grated romano or Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350F. Chop kale roughly. In a large saucepan with high sides melt one tablespoon of the butter over medium heat. Add as much kale as will fit in the saucepan and a pinch of salt. Wilt the kale, stirring regularly until you can add more kale, continue until you can add all the kale at once. Add another pinch of salt and the remaining sugar. Continue cooking, stirring regularly for another 15 minutes.
Meanwhile in a second, oven-proof, sauce pan melt the second tablespoon of butter over medium heat. Whisk in the tablespoon of flour and cook, whisking regularly for 3 minutes. Slowly whisk in milk. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring regularly for 10 minutes. Slowly stir in three quarters of the cheese. Once melted and uniform stir in cooked kale and some freshly ground pepper. Taste and add more salt and pepper if needed. Sprinkle with remaining cheese and transfer to the oven. Cook for 15 minutes. Serve hot.

From the Mesa Top: June 8, 2017
Climatology 2017: The weather pattern is in full swing of summer. This week especially with high pressure over the state and moisture moving into place underneath it. There is very little wind, clouds billow up over the mountains, and slowly drift out over the nearby prairies and valleys.
From the Wild: This week’s new emerging wildflower is phlox:

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prickly pears are also beginning to offer their yellow flowers

us_nm_02

Cow stories: We successfully separated the calfs from the cows and walked the cows north a couple of miles to their rich new pasture.
We had 13 calfs held behind at the farm headquarters.
5 Momma cows broke down one gate and then a second fence and walked all the way back to the pasture where the calfs are being kept. 3 of the momma cows broke their calfs out of the pasture and walked back, 2 miles north, and rejoined the herd.
If the escapees are all steers, well then so be it, but we do not want heifers that are too young to be safely bred, to be out with the herd.
The calfs that are still at home are not showing much concern that they have been separated. We are keeping lots if hay in front of them and they can eat all they wasn’t without being pushed around by bigger cows.
Later this week we will have to sort them all out again.
From the garden: the planting is nearing completion: zucchini, cucumbers, and butternut squash. Weeding is soon to begin.
Beneficial birds: Chickens are fine, eggs are plentiful
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of June 1st, 2017

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday June 1st, 2017

Garlic Braid from Allicin Ranch
Spring Onions from Sol Harvest
Cucumber from Preferred Produce
Garlic Scapes from Vida Verde
Hinona Kabu Long Turnips from Vida Verde
Salad Mix from Synergia Ranch

Time to Spice Things Up!!!
We are going to delay our launch of the Spice Share until next week, as we realized we did not include details on adding this to your subscription.
The Spice Share is a recurring share we have added as an option for members. We are trying to recruit people to sign up to receive this share on a regular basis, so our partner can anticipate and plan for a certain number of member orders each month, so we make sure have enough. You can add the Spice Share to your account through updating your Farmigo account, or by emailing us, and we can add it on.

We are pleased to share with you that we are launching a Spice Share. Once a month, on the first Thursday, people that have signed for the spice share will receive 3 different, unique spices with their normal order, along with recipe that use them. These spices will have a theme each month, sometimes it will be regional like Ethiopian, Peruvian or some months it will be a cooking topic like BBQ or Holiday baking.

We have partnered with Savory Spice shop, to help us find these spices, and help our membership understand what to do with them. Every week, we find lots of cool local foods for your share that challenge your cooking, and expand your skill set. The spice club is designed to do the same thing, but with spices from around the world, so you can explore all culinary flavors of world from your home. The owner of Savory Spice, has worked for 13 years in the spice world, also teaching History of Spice at the community college, so we are in great hands. We might even include a spice in your farm share when there are all the other ingredients for an amazing dinner.

Frankincense Tears, Juniper Berry Spice, Tikka Masala, there are so many new amazing spices to discover so let the journey begin! The first Spice Share will be available next week, we will let you know next Monday what we decide to do to kick this off, we promise it will not be disappointing!

100520504-spices

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Cilantro: On the marketplace
Kale, White and Red Russian Mix: On the marketplace
Garlic Scapes: On the marketplace
Shallot Scapes: On the marketplace
Sage: On the marketplace
Tarragon: On the marketplace
Peppermint: On the marketplace
Napa Cabbage: On the marketplace
Mustard Greens: On the marketplace
Long Japanese Turnips: On the marketplace
Diakon Radish: On the marketplace
Spring Onions: On the marketplace
Swiss Chard: On the marketplace
Bok Choy: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

The Organic, Gourmet Salad Mix in your share this week will include micro greens such as: purple orach, golden chard, red Russian kale, mustard greens, hint of dill. This, paired with the cucumber in your share will make for a wonderful salad this week!

salad
Pickled Hinona Kabu Turnip (Japanese Turnip) 

944096
Ingredients
• Hinona Kabu turnip (Japanese Turnip), cleaned & sliced
• 1/4 cup rice vinegar
• 1 teaspoon sea salt
• 2 cups brown rice vinegar
• 1 cup sugar
• sterilized jar (s)
Instructions
To sterilize jars, submerge the jars & lids in the boiling water for 3 minutes. Drain on a wire rack until needed.
Heat all vinegars and sugar in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir often until sugar has dissolved; add 1 teaspoon salt and let cool for 10 minutes
Add Hinona Kabu in sterilized jars and pour over pickling juice. Keep them refrigerated for 7 days before using.

Creamy Garlic Pasta 

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Ingredients
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, minced
¼ teaspoon salt
8 ounces pasta ( your favorite)
1 Cup of Parmesan Cheese
1.2 Cup of Heavy Cream Fresh Parsley ¬ diced
Instructions
1. Cook Pasta According to the instructions on the box ¬ you can use water or chicken stock ( about 6 cups) ¬ once cooked ¬ drain
2. In a large skillet ¬ add oil and butter ( melt) add garlic
3. Mix in pasta, Parmesan cheese, a little parsley, pepper ( pinch) , and salt
4. Add in cream slowly
5. Top with Parsley and enjoy!

Roasted Garlic 

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INGREDIENTS
One or more whole heads of garlic.
METHOD
1 Preheat your oven to 400°F (205° C). (A toaster oven works great for this.)
2 Peel and discard the papery outer layers of the whole garlic bulb, leaving intact the skins of the individual cloves of garlic. Using a sharp knife, cut 1/4 to a 1/2 inch from the top of cloves, exposing the individual cloves of garlic.
3 Place the garlic heads in a baking pan, cut side up. (A muffin pan works great for this, as it keeps the garlic bulbs from rolling around.) Drizzle a couple teaspoons of olive oil over each exposed head, using your fingers to rub the olive oil over all the cut, exposed garlic cloves. Cover the bulb with aluminum foil. Bake at 400°F (205°C) for 30-35 minutes, or until the cloves feel soft when pressed.
4 Allow the garlic to cool enough so you can touch it without burning yourself. Use a small small knife cut the skin slightly around each clove. Use a cocktail fork or your fingers to pull or squeeze the roasted garlic cloves out of their skins.
Eat as is (I love straight roasted garlic) or mash with a fork and use for cooking. Can be spread over warm French bread, mixed with sour cream for a topping for baked potatoes, or mixed in with Parmesan and pasta.

Garlic Scape Pesto 

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Ingredients
• 1/4 cup pine nuts
• 3 garlic scapes
• 1 cup fresh basil
• salt and pepper
• 1/2 cup olive oil
• 1/2 cup grated parmesan
• 2 pounds fresh fettuccine or one pound dried fettuccine, cooked al dente
• 1/2 cup reserved pasta cooking water
• 2 ripe tomatoes, seeded and chopped
• 2 tablespoons heavy cream

Instructions
1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread the pine nuts out in a single layer on a baking sheet. Toast the pine nuts in the oven for about 4 minutes, stopping to stir with a metal spatula about half way through. Keep a close eye on the pine nuts as they can go from toasted to burnt very quickly. Remove from oven and allow to cool.
2. Rinse the garlic scapes and cut off the point end and discard. Chop the garlic scapes into 2 inch pieces.
3. Combine the pine nuts, garlic scapes, basil, salt and pepper in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. With the machine running, gradually stream in the olive oil until the mixture is smooth and thick.
4. Use a spatula to transfer the pesto to a bowl. Add the parmesan and mix well. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste, and add an extra drizzle of olive oil if needed.
5. Transfer the cooked pasta to a large serving bowl. Add the pesto, heavy cream and tomatoes to the pasta and toss well. Add reserved pasta cooking water slowly, a splash at a time, as you toss the pasta; this will help to make the sauce creamy and rich; note that you will probably not need to use the entire 1/2 cup of reserved pasta water. Serve with extra grated parmesan.

From the Mesa Top: June 1, 2017
Climatology 2017: Moisture is back. We had a modest shower late afternoon on Memorial Day and are expecting several more stormy days. The smell of damp air in the morning, and then the smell of the ground and trees after some rain are good.
From the Wild: The red, round cactus that are in sunny, warm spots, especially the ones that are perched among the rock, are starting to bloom. But they do not seem to be in much of a hurry. Generally it has been fairly cool so far this spring.
Cow stories: The state lease land is ready, and the grass is good. Our largest water tank is set up and full. Any day now… The first group to go will be cows without calfs, the 3 big boy bulls, and 2 large steers who have weaned themselves.
We bought a little more hay because we need to separate and wen last year’s calf crop, and we do not want to move the mommas or the babies up to a far pasture and set off a ruckus as they call each other from 2 miles away.
We can wean them nearby. The mommas will realize that no harm is coming to their little ones, who will also realize that they don’t really NEED momma any more.
Also one more calf was born. A little brown bully boy.
From the garden: The heavy frost damaged the outer leaves of the zukes even with a row cover that is rated 6 degrees of protection, so it was 25 degrees of below at Mesa Top
Beneficial birds: Chickens are fine, eggs are plentiful
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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