Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of February 23rd, 2017

 

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday February 23rd, 2017

Green Leaf Lettuce from Preferred Produce

Spinach from Sol y Tierra Coop

Red Russian Kale from Anthony Youth Farm

Cucumbers from Preferred Produce

Cilantro from Anthony Youth Farm

Chicos from Casados Farm

 

 

Grab your cup of coffee, tea, or later in the day beer or wine, and tuck in for some words on the national efforts on local food support!

 facebook_isupportmyfarmer2

National CSA Sign-Up Day!!

It is that time of year again, where we join the national movement of over 1353 CSAs throughout the US and Canada to promote local CSAs on a massive scale!! We spend a lot of time every week working with our local farmers and producers, but since we are so focused on local, we don’t always share the work on how local is part of a national movement!!

Our friends at Small Farm Central are key advocates that are helping to promote buying local, on a national scale. They have been working to promote local CSAs for years, providing educational, technical and marketing materials that a single small CSA could not easily manage, but for the combined support of all the nation’s CSA’s. Of their many achievements, one of the biggest efforts of late has been National CSA Signup Day, first recognized 2015, for February 28th!!

One of the coolest things we hear when a member signs up, is that they were a CSA supporter where they lived, and want to continue to support a CSA! This lets us know that no matter where you go, as a member, you will continue to support local food in your new communities! This is reflected in the work that SFC is doing, bring all our CSAs together to support each other. Some of the members on our mailing list have moved but stayed on the list, and we hope that they are supporting the CSA in their community!

 

A Vision for 5 Million CSA Members by 2030!

From Simon Huntley of Small Farm Central

I have been doing a lot of thinking about the future of CSA farms over the past few years. With CSA Day 2017 upon us, I wanted to take time to reflect on where we are, where we are going, and why we are doing this.

I am passionate about CSA farming because I see the special connection between farmers and eaters, but also see a path to an economically sustainable small-to-medium scale farm. I believe that economic sustainability is tied inextricably to agricultural sustainability and that CSA is an important part of that puzzle because it allows a farmer to control his or her market with a degree of certainty and margin that no other marketing channel allow.

In addition, CSA is the most direct connection that an eater can have with his or her farmer and is a connection to the land that an eater can’t get in any other way. Through CSA, we imbue food with meaning, story, and connection. In a world of intractable problems, being a CSA farmer or CSA member is an act we can take to make life better for our land, economy, and community as a whole.

The CSA Market Right Now

However, CSA only touches a tiny minority of households. I was focused on this fact through the Local Food Marketing Practice Survey that was released in December by the USDA (hat tip to Elizabeth Henderson for emailing the data to me). This data is for the United States only, but I think the lessons can be applied anywhere in the world.

They list the total sales of all 7,398 CSA farms at $226,000,000 in 2015. In a lot of ways, I look at that data and think CSA has been a huge success in 30 seasons in the United States. This is a concept that has resonated with the public without any corporate, governmental, or moneyed interests behind it.

On the other hand, let’s look at that data in terms of the overall food marketplace.

If we take the average share price data from our CSA Farming Report of $450, then we get the number of approximately 500,000 CSA shares sold in 2015.

There are 124.6 million households in the U.S., so that means approximately 0.4% of US households purchase a CSA share each year.

So, despite the huge success of the CSA concept, it is still very niche. Looking at these numbers, I can’t believe that 0.4% is the ceiling of CSA.

I think CSA farming is so important for farmers and eaters, so I am setting a goal of growing the overall CSA market by 10x, to 5 million households, by 2030.

Even with this exponential growth of CSA, we will still be serving only 1 in 25 households in the United States. That is still a small slice of the population and I believe that is possible for us to get there.

However, what got us to 500,000 CSA members, will not get us to 5 million. We need to reimagine what CSA is to appeal to a much wider demographic and we need to get better at articulating the values of CSA. Your customers and potential customers work hard for their money too, so we must appeal to their values and their interests as we plot a way forward.

While we reimagine CSA, we can’t lose sight of what has made CSA such an impactful concept. I believe that if we simply compete with the grocery stores or the Blue Aprons of the world, we lose. CSA must be about more than a simple box of food.

What will this growth of the CSA market mean for your farm? What will this growth mean for the overall local food market? How do we get there?

I ask these questions, but I don’t have the answers. I have some guesses. However, I believe that reaching this goal it is possible if we all work together on the local, regional, national, and international scale. I want to start the conversation with you because I believe that this growth is essential for a thriving local food economy and, I worry that if don’t radically grow CSA, it will become more niche and eventually wither on the vine.

I firmly believe that when we all do better, we all do better. Your success is my success.

I would love to hear from you: how do you feel about this goal? Is it reasonable? Do you have ideas on how we can get there?

I can be reached at simon@smallfarmcentral.com. We can continue the discussion on the CSA Farmer Discussion group on Facebook (request access here), at winter conferences, and in the fields.

I look forward to growing with you over the next 13 years!

 

Historic CSA Farm Charter set for USA & Canada

Written by Steven McFadden (Member of BFCSA) on February 10, 2017

I’m pleased to share this press release, just developed by a community of people who recognize the importance of community farms (CSAs), and who see the potential for enhancing our environment, improving our diets, supporting our local farmers, and cooperating for mutual benefit with our neighbors. ~ SM

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farms across the United States and Canada are setting roots more deeply in the land as they unite this year under a community-developed Charter for CSAs that provides a clear definition of what CSA farms are all about.

charter-logo-color-1

Logo for the CSA Charter by Ruth Blackwell

With 30 years of history and development, over 7,500 healthy, sustainable community farms have been established in the US, and many thousands more in Canada. These sustainable farms are directly networked with hundreds of thousands of households in the towns and cities where they are based and provide weekly shares of fresh, healthy, locally-grown food.

Together, regional networks and independent CSAs in the USA and Canada are banding together to launch an innovative and strengthening Charter for CSAs. The Charter will be inaugurated on CSA Sign-up Day, February 24, 2017.

CSAs that endorse the Charter are making a public commitment to uphold the principles and practices delineated in the Charter. It will provide a window of transparency for member households and for farmers, helping define and clarify what CSA farms are all about.

In the words of Elizabeth Henderson, CSA farmer and author of Sharing the Harvest, “CSA is a tremendously flexible concept for consumer-farmer connections. It’s an alternative system of distribution based on community values. The economics of direct sales make this a win-win solution for farmers and farm members. The farmer gets a decent price and the member pays less, since there is no middleman.”

“For the farmer,” she added, “CSA offers the possibility of a broad support group. Those groups are composed of local people who know about the farm, who genuinely care about it’s survival, and who are willing to share the farmer’s risks and rewards.

“In reciprocity, CSA farm members have the opportunity to eat fresh, healthy food, to connect with the earth, to know and trust in the people who grow their food, to deepen their understanding of seasonal eating, to support the local economy, and to take an empowered stance of accepting responsibility for one of our most basic needs.”

Anthony Graham, a farmer for 30 years at the Temple-Wilton Community Farm in New Hampshire, said, “When we started the Temple Wilton Community Farm, we were interested in community and in the ‘culture’ of agriculture. What we were attempting to set up was a way for a community of people to support the existence of a farm through good times and bad by making pledges of financial support over the course of one year. By agreeing to support the existence of the farm our members became co-farmers.”

You can find the full Charter for CSAs in the USA and Canada here, along with background information and a list of the CSAs that endorse it.

 

Your CSA Recap

Between these two amazing articles by such strong CSA advocates, we also wanted to make sure you look at the links as well. Please check out the Charter for CSAs in the USA and Canada which we will be participating in and just as importantly, the map of the participating CSAs across the nation! Zoomed out, the USA is almost complete covered by local farmers supporting their neighbors, something we hope to see grow to also be true as you look with a few miles of your home!!

Anyone on social media, please consider temporarily changing your profile picture to our “I Support My Local Farmer” ribbon!! No matter where you live, which farmer you support, all the local farmer’s in the nation need our support, and we can show it to them!

csaday-i-support-my-local-farmer

Beneficial Farms CSA is Looking for More Members

This is an excellent time for us to talk to our members, and ask them to help us reach out to your friends and neighbors! A lot of our time these last few weeks has been focused on how can we support our farmers even more this year than we have before. We are digging deep and finding ideas we will grow, but so much of our capacity to support farmers comes from you! Our CSA is the oldest in the state, cultivating relationships between farmers/producers and your families for the last 23 years, and we are not planning on slowing down or stopping the support of our local food network.

We are offering a $10 bonus for current members who refer a new member, provided they stay on for their first investment, and an additional bonus for re-newel for their support. We are also doing a bunch of fun stuff behind the scenes you will see shortly, our new website being a soon coming component.

 

There are two main components to the CSA model, the farmers and the community support! We want to continue to grow what we can do for our farmers, and with that, we need the community to grow and continue to support us!

This organization isn’t run by some corporate out of state company, it is built on your support and want for local food, that directly employs farmers, ranchers and producers through the state, we just help bring it together!

 

CSA Recipes Needed:

We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

 

 

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Spaghetti Squash: On the marketplace

Hubbard Squash: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Cucumbers: On the Marketplace

Spinach: On the Marketplace

Green Lettuce: On the Marketplace

Kale: On the Marketplace

Salad Mix: On the Marketplace

Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

 

What are Chicos?

For those immersed in NM cuisine, you may be familiar with chicos, as well as the other traditional crops like chili pods, posole and atole. Chicos are one of the golden foods traditionally grown in NM, which are prized and valued by those who have tried them. Chicos are made by taking sweet corn, roasting it over flames, then drying the cob to produce dried chicos kernels. Upon re-hydrating these kernels in your recipe, you bring back an unforgettable flavor of roasted sweet corn. As our friends at Edible found “They’re actually listed on the U.S. Ark of Taste, a catalog of outstandingly delicious traditional foods in danger of extinction.”

New Mexico has a wealth of hidden food culture and foods not found anywhere else in the world! While we have a lot of more recognizable foods in our CSA, we want to ensure that our members experience these hidden treasures and come to cherish them.

We also wanted to take a moment to recognize the importance of our pueblo farmers, and their crops. We work with Peter Casado of Okey Owingeh Pueblo, just North of Espanola. They practice pesticide free farming, and seed saving, as many of their crops are traditional native grown foods. With the traditional pueblo grown crops, they predated any Org practices, passing down traditions of holistic growing habits through the generations. The time I have spent with them has shown me that in such a rich agricultural based society in which they learned how to grow certain foods and combat the elements hundreds of years before pesticides were invented, and those practices are passed through tradition and various stories or metaphors. Also, the very isolated nature of the pueblos has insulated many of their crops, practices and field from western influence. Unlike a corn grower in Nebraska, that decides to plant non-gmo corn, but their neighbor does and then their fields cross pollinate and his crop becomes GMO, pueblo farmers have a natural and cultural buffer against many of the things we are now realizing are harmful to our health.

 

I guess we should have been talking to the original stewards of the lands before we tried to mess with it, we are now learning a thing or two.

 

Chico Stew 

chicos

Ingredients

  • 2 cups chicos
  • 10 cups cold water
  • 2 T. oil
  • 1/2 pound pork, cut in ½ inch cubes
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 t. salt
  • 1/2 t. dried oregano
  • 4-5 dried green or red chiles, crumbled

Instructions

  1. Soak chicos in cold water overnight, then cook (with the water) in a crockpot all day on low. If you prefer, you can just simmer them on the stove for about 3 hours after soaking.
  2. Heat the oil on medium flame, and sear the pork.
  3. Add the onion and garlic, and cook until translucent.
  4. Add the salt, oregano, chiles, and the chicos with all their water. Cook 20 minutes (or longer, as desired) to blend the flavors and rehydrate the chiles.

 

Apple Cucumber Spinach Juice 

cucumber-smothy

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1 handful of spinach
  • 1/2 cucumber
  • 1 apple
  • 1/2 lemon
  • 1/2 inch piece of ginger root

Start by thoroughly washing your spinach to remove any dirt or grit that could be still on the leaves. Then carefully wash your cucumber, apple and lemon.

Cut your cucumber and apple into smaller chunks so as to make your juicer happy. Then cut your lemon in half and remove the rind but leave on as much of the white as you can. Then cut a 1/2 inch piece of ginger root and remove the outer skin of that.

I started by putting my ginger and lemon in the juicer followed by the cucumber chunks. By putting the ginger in first, you are getting as much of that ginger juice pushed through as possible. Then I added in the handful of spinach and followed that with the remaining apple. I followed the spinach with the apple in order to help the juicer process it because spinach can be hard on your juicer.

Once everything has been processed and juiced, you’ll be left with one cup of this delicious apple cucumber spinach juice to enjoy!

 

Cilantro-Lime Cucumber Salad 

cucuber-cilanto

Ingredients

  • 1 jalapeno, seeded and finely diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • ½ teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • black pepper to taste
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cucumbers, very finely sliced (see photos)
  • 4 tablespoons minced cilantro, to taste

Instructions

  1. Dice the jalapeno and garlic and add to a medium-sized bowl.
  2. Add 3 tablespoons of fresh lime juice, crushed red pepper, salt, and pepper. Use a whisk to incorporate the 3 tablespoons olive oil. Set aside.
  3. Finely slice the cucumbers. Use a mandolin if you have it, but a very sharp knife will do the trick. (See photos below.) Add the cucumbers to the dressing and stir together.
  4. Finely mince the cilantro and add it to the bowl. Stir to combine. You can either let it sit in the fridge to marinate for a couple hours, or serve immediately.

 

Spring Salad: Lettuce and Cantaloupe with Avocado Cilantro Lime Dressing 

melon-lettuce-salad

For the salad: 

  • One large head of green leaf lettuce, rinsed and torn into bite-size pieces
  • Half a large cantaloupe, divided into wedges and sliced in 1/4-inch pieces

 

For the dressing, whir up in a blender:

  • One ripe avocado
  • Juice of two limes
  • 1 bunch cilantro, chopped
  • salt
  • splash of olive oil
  • water for thinning, as needed.

Toss with salad just before serving. Excellent as an accompaniment to spicy rice and beans.

 

From the Mesa Top: Feb 23, 2017

Climatology 2017:  A warm and dry week, then windy, then a cold day or two, and back again.  The merry go round of transition from winter to spring.

From the Wild:  A pair of ducks was spotted on the reservoir!  It is time to keep an eye out for migrating birds.  We finished a new fence that is close to the edge of the reservoir and now we hope to begin more habitat improvements with the idea on mind that more migratory birds will hatch their clutch of eggs and stay through the summer. Brush piles and plantings.

There is a natural water hole that has developed a coyote willow thicket.  It would work to take cuttings from there and dig them in around the edge of the reservoir, right at the high water line.

Cow stories:  Out on the pastures, fences are being repaired.  Our best looking pasture for spring is the northern NM State lease.  We have one section of fence to repair on that lease.  Also a ¼ mile section to build that will also connect to another one of our pastures.

Meanwhile, more signs of spring:  In favored spots that are damp and south facing, green grass is appearing.

The cows are lazily and happily enjoying the best of worlds: Sun and warmth, hay a plenty, and no flies!

Bow, one of two remaining cows from the very beginning of the Ayrshire project, born in summer 2008, will calf any day now.

There are other momma starting to fill out as well.

Spring calfing should be ramping up.

Beneficial birds:  The hens have rebounded from winter to an excellent level of egg production.  With one crop of pullets already moved to the main coop, we are almost ready to start one more batch.

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

 

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of February 16th, 2017

 

Check out the Webstore

 

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday February 16th, 2017

 

Red Bell Peppers from Preferred Produce

Red Leaf Lettuce from Preferred Produce

Dried Red Chili Pods from Sol y Tierra

Spinach from Anthony Youth Farm

Red Russian Kale from Anthony Youth Farm

Pea Shoots from Sungreen Living Foods

 

“The Hollow Bone”
Flute Making at Jemez Pueblo
Bodhi Manda Zen Center Jemez Springs

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Jemez Pueblo flute maker and player Marlon Magdalena will help us create traditional cane flutes and share the important meaning of flutes in the life of Pueblo people. Marlon says, “I proudly participate in all aspects of Jemez Life; for instance, I speak the Jemez Language, I plant Jemez corn, sing Jemez songs, and dance Jemez Dances. I am proud that I am from a place that still continues our ancient ways of life.”

We will also enjoy a day of service with Jemez Pueblo member Roger Fragua on his farm, planting Heritage seeds for the spring and learning about traditional cultural values. We will be joined by Pueblo community members, Mexican migrant farm worker families and volunteers. Roger has said, “Farming with nature (the root of organic farming) lies at the heart of practices used by native farmers in the Southwest for millennia. Traditional cultural farming can teach us a great deal about how to build a resilient and regenerative agriculture.”

For information on cost and registration, contact: info@earthwalks.org505-231-5802

New Fresh Pasta!

We are adding some great fresh pasta from Nocco this week, Spinach Linguine, Ricotta Ravioli and Christmas Fettucine! Also jarred peaches and pears from MM Local Colorado are now available.

ricotta20ravioli

Easter Ham Pre-Order!!

Here we are reminiscing about how fast January flew by, and we want you to think about April!

Something we have been missing, waiting for and dreaming of is now here ….Kyzer Smoked Pork!

pork20butts_zpsgad4jxei

I think for all our pork lovers, we are huge fans of the wonderful flavor that Kyzer’s local grown heritage pork has to offer, but have you had it smoke?

One of the perks of working closely with our partners through the years, I have been treated to freshly smoked Kyzer pork when the Coop was working on the recipe with their in-house smoker, and pit boss Gabe. Back then, Gabe would get the pork on the smoker at 6 am, and give it about 6-8 hours, making bacon, hams, shanks.. pretty much anything they could try! Coop members might have had some of these fine smoked meats at the deli. Unfortunately, as the Coop looked into the costs associated with smoking their own meat to be retail certified, the costs stopped the project in its steps.

cdc20smoker_zpshwdp8cu4

Now, through partnership with the group that makes the Sweetgrass jerky, they have brought back the coveted smoke pork!!

We are adding Kyzer Bacon to the marketplace this week, as well as taking Pre-Orders for Smoked Hams for Easter!!!

We have Kyzer Half and Quarter Boneless Hams available this week only to pre-order for your Easter holiday! We need to give the whole food system enough time to make this happen, from producer-processor-smoker-you! Half Hams are $5.85/lb (4-6lb) Quarter Hams are $6.25/lb (2-3lb)

kyzer20ham_zpsafacyo3p

Not a Pork fan, or looking for Passover options?

We just received our shipment of King Salmon from the Sea Miner, our Seashaken CSF partner! These are whole salmon, 7-11# each, but the deal our members get through our project is astounding! We are offering King Salmon at $12/lb for the whole fish, store prices can range as high as $22/lb, so this is a huge bargain, well worth the time it takes to fillet it. King Salmon will be on the marketplace while supplies last, email us for Pre-Orders!

sockeye_salmon_fillet

 

CSA Recipes Needed:

We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

 

 

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Spaghetti Squash: On the marketplace

Butternut Squash: On the marketplace

Hubbard Squash: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Cucumbers: On the Marketplace

Spinach: On the Marketplace

Green Lettuce: On the Marketplace

Kale: On the Marketplace

Salad Mix: On the Marketplace

Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Baby Spinach and Pea Shoot Salad with a Honey Lemon Vinaigrette 

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Serves 2

  • 2 large handfuls young pea shoots
  • 2 handfuls baby spinach
  • ¼ cup chopped and roasted pistachios
  • 12 pieces thinly shaved Grana Padano or Parmesan cheese
  • Juice of 1/2 large lemon
  • ¼ cup fruity olive oil
  • ½ to ¾ teaspoons honey
  • Sea salt and pepper to taste for the vinaigrette
  1. Wash the greens and dry them very thoroughly. Place them in a mixing bowl. Add the pistachio nuts and the cheese.
  2. To the lemon juice, add the honey and mix together thoroughly. Then whisk in the olive oil until the vinaigrette is emulsified. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Pour the dressing over the salad and lightly and carefully toss. Transfer to a serving bowl.

 

How to Make New Mexico Red Chile Sauce from Pods 

red-chile-sause-web

We’ve been growing some of the hottest red chile in New Mexico for a long time now. People always ask us how to make authentic red chile sauce with our dried red chiles. So we decided that it is now time to share our family recipe for red chile sauce. Enjoy!

Makes about 8cups

Perfect for:

  • Red Enchiladas
  • Chile Con Carne
  • Posole
  • Chile Beans

Ingredients:

  • Red Chile Pods
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Cumin
  • Whole Crushed Oregano
  • Granulated garlic
  • Salt or granulated chicken bouillon
  • Flour
  • Oil

Directions:

  1. Rinse and remove the stems and seeds from approximately 25 pods.
  2. In a pot, add enough water to fully cover pods.
  3. Add 1 bay leaf.
  4. Bring to a boil and let simmer for 20 minutes, then let cool slightly.
  5. Remove bay leaf, and with a blender puree pods and the water.
  6. Use a colander to separate the pulp from the skin, do this several cups at a time.

To the Pureed Sauce add:

  1. .5 tsp cumin
  2. 1 tsp whole oregano (crushed)
  3. 2 tsp granulated garlic
  4. 2 tsp salt or granulated chicken bouillon

*To make a roux:

  1. Add 1 tsp of oil and 1 tsp flour
  2. Let simmer for about 2 minutes.

Add to chile sauce to thicken and bring to a boil.

Kale and Roasted Red Pepper Frittata 

27739_kale_red_pepper_fritatta

INGREDIENTS (6)

  • 12 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup blanched and coarsely chopped kale or chard, baby Asian greens or arugula
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced roasted red peppers (could also use steamed zucchini or yellow squash, or tomatoes)
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar or pepper jack cheese
  • Cooking oil or unsalted butter

 

Adapted from Rhea Yablon Kennedy

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Combine the eggs and milk in a large bowl and whisk until smooth. Stir in the vegetables and half of the cheese.
  2. Heat oil or butter over medium heat in a large nonstick, ovenproof frying pan. When the oil shimmers or the butter stops foaming, add the egg mixture to the pan, reduce the heat to medium low, and cover. Allow to cook, making sure there is no visible bubbling, until set.
  3. Sprinkle the remaining cheese on top and cook until melted or, if desired, place the skillet under the broiler for a minute or two to brown the top.
  4. Use a knife to loosen the sides of the frittata, turn onto a cutting board, and slice. Serve hot, or chill and serve cold.

Red Russian Kale and Chorizo Soup 

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Ingredients

8 ounces Spanish chorizo, thinly sliced crosswise

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 large onion, chopped

2 large garlic cloves, minced

1/2 teaspoon red chile flakes

1/2 teaspoon pepper

7 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

3/4 pound russet potato, peeled and chopped

12 ounces Red Russian or other kale, stems removed and leaves cut into slender ribbons

Kosher salt (optional)

 

Preparation

  1. Cook chorizo in oil in a pot over medium-high heat, stirring often, until browned, about 5 minutes. Transfer chorizo to a paper towel with a slotted spoon.
  2. Add onion to fat in pot and sauté until softened, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in garlic, chile flakes, and pepper; cook about 1 minute. Add broth and potato; cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until potato is tender, about 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in kale and chorizo; cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer until kale is tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Season with salt.

 

From the Mesa Top: Feb 16, 2017

Climatology 2017:  A warm and dry week is in the rear view mirror and another one stretches out ahead of us with a possible return to wintry weather on the coming weekend.

It has been an incredible relief to feel the warmth of the sun for several days in a row.  The ground has dried out in almost all of the corals and the cows are able to move around safely.

It is very unlikely that winter is over, but as the days get longer and the nights shorter, it feels like mornings warm up more quickly and the bounce back after a storm is quicker.

Wind becomes more of a presence.

We are inching toward a change of season

From the Wild:  The mourning Doves are many and loud.  The mountain Bluebirds are many and active and flighty.  Woodpeckers are also around.  We watch for the first Robin sighting…

Cow stories:  Last week you read a long and generally discouraging report about the unrealistic expectations of non-farm/ag residents who move into ranch country and then complain about the presence of cows.

As a matter of self-defense we turned to the New Mexico Livestock Board for assistance.  Our district inspector came out and inspected our fences.  He made some specific suggestions which, on completion, earn his endorsement that we are taking all reasonable efforts to keep our cows inside our fences.

At that point when cows get out, as they inevitably will, the Livestock Board will be in position to remind neighbors that they are responsible for their own property boundaries.

We have a lot more old fence to upgrade on other land that we lease

We also have a substantial rebuild and some new fence to complete for the State Land Office on our Northern Lease land.

As for the cows and the pastures we are eyeing our Northern State lease as the first likely pasture for the herd.  We reviewed hay purchases and in some years have bought hay all the way through April.  Letting the spring growth get a jump start is a good step to help maximize forage production for the season.

Ideally we will sell some cows this spring, and pay for the winter hay and maybe extend the feeding season a bit to allow for spring growth.  Unless the weather turns very windy and hot too quickly, we can look forward to some good growth of the cool season grasses.

Beneficial birds:  The hens also benefit from the warmer weather and increasing day length.

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday February 9th, 2017

Peach Juice from Paonia, CO; Juiced by Mesa Ruiz

Red Bell Peppers from Preferred Produce

Red Leaf Lettuce from Preferred Produce

Posole from Casado Farm

Red Potatoes from Schwebach Farm

Cucumbers from Preferred Produce

 

Roses are Red, …. and so is half of your share!

In honor of the upcoming Valentine’s Day, it seemed only fitting we had a few red foods in the share, to compliment whatever you might be cooking to make the day special!

Peach Juice!

When have you seen 100%, raw, local peach juice on the shelves of your grocery store before? Odds are, never, or rarely! We tried out an idea with our juicing partner Mesa last fall, to juice peaches we had in abundance. It turns out, peaches are really difficult to juice, the pulp does not separate like apples or pears. We did end up with peach juice, but the yield was around 1/3 of that apples’ juice , a new learning experience. We froze and saved this juice for members, so we could have a taste of fall, in the deep of winter!

Put an Egg On It!

Good lord, January flew by, we forgot to give you a heads up about the Edible magazines we were including in your shares last week! As we told you in our Egg-celent update, we have been very blessed these last few months, both in receiving a VAPG grant for our Beneficial Eggs, but also the timely article Edible Magazine wrote about us for their local brunch special. For anyone who didn’t get a copy of the magazine this week, you can view it online, page 70:

https://issuu.com/ediblesantafe/docs/esf-latewinter2017

We are so grateful to the Stephanie, Ric and the whole Edible team for including our egg program in their issue! We decided that we want to continue to include Edible issues in our shares as they come out. It’s a fabulous magazine focused on the local food scene, and we believe it will be a welcome addition to our member’s shares! Edible comes out with an issue every other month, so look forward to another new copy in April!

 

Easter Ham Pre-Order!!

Here we are reminiscing about how fast January flew by, and we want you to think about April!

Something we have been missing, waiting for and dreaming of is now here ….Kyzer Smoked Pork!

I think for all our pork lovers, we are huge fans of the wonderful flavor that Kyzer’s local grown heritage pork has to offer, but have you had it smoke?

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One of the perks of working closely with our partners through the years, I have been treated to freshly smoked Kyzer pork when the Coop was working on the recipe with their in-house smoker, and pit boss Gabe. Back then, Gabe would get the pork on the smoker at 6 am, and give it about 6-8 hours, making bacon, hams, shanks.. pretty much anything they could try! Coop members might have had some of these fine smoked meats at the deli. Unfortunately, as the Coop looked into the costs associated with smoking their own meat to be retail certified, the costs stopped the project in its steps.

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Now, through partnership with the group that makes the Sweetgrass jerky, they have brought back the coveted smoke pork!!

We are adding Kyzer Bacon to the marketplace this week, as well as taking Pre-Orders for Smoked Hams for Easter!!!

We have Kyzer Half and Quarter Boneless Hams available this week only to pre-order for your Easter holiday! We need to give the whole food system enough time to make this happen, from producer-processor-smoker-you! Half Hams are $5.85/lb (4-6lb) Quarter Hams are $6.25/lb (2-3lb)

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Not a Pork fan, or looking for Passover options?

We just received our shipment of King Salmon from the Sea Miner, our Seashaken CSF partner! These are whole salmon, 7-11# each, but the deal our members get through our project is astounding! We are offering King Salmon at $12/lb for the whole fish, store prices can range as high as $22/lb, so this is a huge bargain, well worth the time it takes to fillet it. King Salmon will be on the marketplace while supplies last, email us for Pre-Orders!

sockeye_salmon_fillet

 

CSA Recipes Needed:

We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

 

 

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Spaghetti Squash: On the marketplace

Butternut Squash: On the marketplace

Hubbard Squash: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Hamlin Juicing Oranges: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Cucumbers: On the Marketplace

Spinach: On the Marketplace

Green Lettuce: On the Marketplace

Kale: On the Marketplace

Salad Mix: On the Marketplace

Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

 

Red-Leaf Salad with Roasted Sweet Potatoes 

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INGREDIENTS

  • 2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 1 medium red onion, quartered
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 1 package (10 ounces) frozen cut green beans, thawed
  • 1/3 cup walnuts
  • 1 cup plain low-fat yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons white-wine vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed through a garlic press
  • 1 head (10 ounces) red-leaf lettuce, torn into bite-size pieces

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss together sweet potatoes, onion, and oil; season with salt and pepper. Roast until sweet potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes.
  2. Add green beans and walnuts to sheet; toss. Roast until green beans are tender, about 5 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together yogurt, vinegar, and garlic; season dressing with salt and pepper. Top lettuce with roasted vegetable mixture; drizzle with dressing.

 

Potato and beet galette 

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Thinly sliced potatoes and beets bake up crisp on the outside and creamy-tender in the middle. If you can’t find fresh rosemary, try a few pinches of dried oregano or thyme.

Ingredients

  • 3 large Red potatoes
  • 1 large or 2 small red beets
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil, divided
  • 1 Tbsp fresh rosemary, minced
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 6 Tbsp parmesan or Romano cheese, finely grated, divided

 

Instructions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Wash and peel the potatoes. Using a mandoline slicer or knife, cut into rounds about 1/8-inch thick.

Wash and peel the beet(s). Slice the same way as the potatoes, but put into a second bowl. (Keep the potatoes and beets separate to keep the beets’ color from staining the potato slices for a prettier finished product.)

Heat a large, heavy ovenproof skillet on medium-high. When the skillet is hot, add 2 Tbsp olive oil and use a pastry brush to coat the sides.

Begin to build the galette in the hot skillet by layering potato slices in overlapping circles until the bottom of the pan is covered. When the first layer is done, sprinkle with a little chopped rosemary, salt and pepper, and 2 Tbsp grated cheese. Continue with the second layer, this time overlapping alternating slices of potato and beet. Save big, uniform slices for the third and final layer. (Getting the pan hot before putting in the vegetables helps crisp the bottom.) Sprinkle with more rosemary, salt, pepper, and another 2 Tbsp grated cheese. Continue layering the potatoes and beets until all are used. Add remaining rosemary and grated cheese. Drizzle the top of the galette with remaining 2 Tbsp olive oil.

Cover the pan with aluminum foil, pressing it tightly onto the vegetables. Turn the heat to medium and cook on the stovetop about 10 minutes. You should hear the bottom of the galette sizzling; if not, turn up the heat slightly.

Remove foil and place skillet in the hot oven. Bake uncovered about 40 to 55 minutes, until the top of the galette is browned, the edges are crisp, and the vegetables are cooked through (test by inserting the tip of a small knife straight down – you should feel no resistance).

When thoroughly cooked, remove from the oven and let sit 5 minutes. Using a heat-proof spatula, loosen the galette from the pan. Slide it onto a cutting board and slice into wedges. Serve immediately.

 

Red Pepper-Filled Appetizer Hearts, Adapted 

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Ingredients

1 ½ cups Biscuit Mix, or homemade variation

2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves

1/3 cup water

¼ cup garlic-and-herbs spreadable cheese (Mix together the butter, cream cheese, Parmesan cheese, garlic, oregano, parsley, thyme, dill, basil, and pepper in a bowl until evenly combined. Chill in refrigerator overnight or 8 hours.)

½ cup finely chopped red bell pepper

2 tablespoons butter, melted

Directions

  •  In medium bowl, stir biscuit mix, oregano and water until mixture comes together. On work surface sprinkled with additional biscuit mix, knead dough 5 times. Roll dough into 13×10-inch rectangle, about 1/8 inch thick.
  •  In small bowl, mix cheese and bell pepper. Spread mixture evenly over dough. Carefully roll long edges of dough to meet in center. Place on cookie sheet lined with cooking parchment paper. Freeze 10 to 15 minutes or until firm.
  •  Meanwhile, heat oven to 400°F. Spray large cookie sheet with cooking spray.
  •  Transfer dough to cutting board. With sharp knife, cut dough into 1/2-inch slices. Place slices, cut sides down, on sprayed cookie sheet. Slightly pinch base of heart into point. Brush butter over hearts.
  •  Bake 7 to 9 minutes or until tops are lightly golden. Cool 10 minutes before serving.

Saucy Hungarian Red Potato Goulash 

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Ingredients:

  • Olive oil
    • 1 (14 ounce) smoked sausage, sliced on the bias into thin medallions
    • 2 tablespoons butter
    • 2 onions, quartered and thinly sliced
    • 1 garlic clove, pressed through garlic press
    • Salt
    • 3/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons paprika
    • 10 medium-size red skin potatoes, peeled and sliced into 1/2” thick circles (about 2 3/4 lbs)
    • 1 1/2 cup chicken stock
    • 1 tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley

Preparation:

-Place a large, deep, non-stick pan (or even medium non-stick pot) over medium-high heat, and add in about 1 tablespoon of oil; once the oil is hot, add in the smoked sausage medallions, and caramelize them for a few minutes until they become a deep brown color; remove the sausage from the pan with a slotted spoon, and set aside.

-To the same pan or pot, add in the butter, and allow it to melt; add in the sliced onions, and caramelize those in the butter and sausage drippings until a rich, golden-brown, about 5-7 minutes; next, add in the garlic, plus a couple of pinches of salt, the freshly cracked black pepper and the paprika, and stir to combine with the onions; saute just until the garlic becomes aromatic.

-Next, add in the sliced potatoes, and fold them into the caramelized onions/garlic to coat them well; add in the chicken stock and stir to combine, then push the sliced potatoes down into the stock/onion mixture as much as possible to allow them to cook evenly; cover the pan/pot with a lid that is askew to allow some steam to escape, and simmer on medium-low heat for about 15 minutes, stirring gently once or twice during this time; then, uncover the pan/pot and allow the potatoes to continue to simmer for another 10 minutes, or until they are tender and the sauce a bit thickened, stirring once or twice during that time. (It’s perfectly fine for some of the potatoes to break up in the sauce as it helps to thicken it, just take care not to break them too much.)

-Finish the Goulash by adding the caramelized smoked sausage back into the pan/pot, as well as the parsley, and gently fold those in to incorporate; add a little drizzle of olive oil in, and add a couple more pinches of salt and pepper, if necessary; serve hot with bread, if desired.

 

Shrimp and Roasted Red Potato Salad 

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 pound red potatoes (4 medium potatoes)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, additional
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper, additional
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cups washed and chopped lettuce
  • 8 ounces cooked shrimp

Preheat oven to 400ºF.

Place potatoes on a small baking pan, drizzle with the olive oil, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Toss to coat well with oil. Place in preheated oven for 30 minutes, or until tender. Allow to cool, then slice each potato and refrigerate until serving time.

Whisk together the lemon juice, mustard, lemon zest, and the additional salt and pepper. Slowly add the olive oil, whisking constantly.

Refrigerate until serving time.

When ready to serve, divide the lettuce between two plates, arrange the potato slices on top of the lettuce, place a shrimp on top of each potato slice and drizzle with the dressing.

(Vegan “Sausage” And Red Bell Pepper Puff Pastry Heart Tarts 

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Vegan Pastry:

1 box Pepperidge Farm Puff Pastry Sheets (removed from box and thawed 40 minutes on counter)

Vegan “Sausage” and Red Pepper Filling:
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 of a large red bell pepper, finely diced
3 large cloves garlic, sliced
8 ounces tempeh (I used the “garden” variety–no pun intended–with flecks of vegetables)
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon Amino Acids
2 tablespoons maple syrup
1 tablespoon fennel seeds
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 pinch red pepper flakes
1 “squirt” of lemon juice
1 “squirt” of Liquid Smoke
1 tablespoon whole wheat flour (white would also work)
4 tablespoons unsweetened soy milk (plain would also work)
coarse sea or kosher salt to taste
freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a large cast iron skillet over medium-high, heat olive oil to shimmering. Add bell pepper and saute for about a minute or two until it starts to soften. Add garlic and saute another couple of minutes or until garlic softens and just barely begins to develop golden color. Crumble tempeh into skillet, stir well and add next 8 ingredients, sauteing and stirring until tempeh is uniform in color, fennel seeds release fragrance, and mixture is warmed through. Sprinkle with flour and immediately add milk, cooking and stirring until flour no longer tastes raw and mixture begins to bind together. Season with salt and pepper, stir well, and remove from heat.

Cut puff pastry into 20 hearts, 10 per sheet and place on a lightly oiled or Silpat-lined baking sheet. Using a spoon or small scoop, place approximately 2 teaspoons of filling into the center of each heart. Bake on the center oven rack for approximately 16-17 minutes. Remove from oven and serve hot, warm or room temperature.

 

Posole! 

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Red Posole With Pork

If you are using dried, soaked posole, a pressure cooker will help tenderize the kernels. For vegetarians: Substitute chopped mushrooms for pork, use vegetable stock in place of chicken. Serves 4-6.

Ingredients

2        tablespoons olive oil, vegetable oil or bacon fat

1        large onion, chopped

1        Fresno (or other red) chile pepper

1        pound cubed pork

1        tablespoon Spanish smoked paprika

1        teaspoon Mexican oregano

2        teaspoons toasted ground cumin

1/4     cup dried, ground chile Powered, from BFCSA

2        teaspoons salt

1        teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

4        cloves garlic, minced

3        tablespoons flour

1        cup beer

1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes

2        quarts chicken stock

About 2 cups dried posole, rinsed, soaked overnight and pre-cooked, or 1 29-ounce can Mexican-style hominy

GARNISHES

Chopped cilantro

Sliced radishes

Shredded cabbage

Shredded cotija (or other hard) cheese

Sour cream

Directions

In a large Dutch oven, heat oil to medium high. Add onion and chile pepper, saute until onions are golden. Add pork, paprika, oregano, cumin and ground chile, salt and pepper, cook until pork is browned. Add garlic, cook a minute more, then add flour. Cook, stirring, until flour has turned golden. Pour in beer, simmer a couple of minutes, scraping any brown bits from bottom of pan. Add tomatoes, chicken stock and posole.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer at least one hour (up to four).

If using a pressure cooker, bring to a boil, seal and cook about 1 hour. The pork will be very tender and easy to shred.

Serve with assorted garnishes.

 

Green Posole with Chicken

If you are using dried, soaked posole, a pressure cooker will help tenderize the kernels. It’s also good with beef or pork, or tofu or mushrooms. Serves 4-6.

Ingredients

2        tablespoons olive oil,vegetable oil or bacon fat

1        large onion, chopped

1        jalapeño (or other green) chile pepper, chopped

1        pound chicken, cut into 2-inch strips

2        teaspoons Mexican oregano

1        teaspoon toasted ground cumin

2        teaspoons salt

1        teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

4        cloves garlic, minced

2-3       cups chopped roasted, seeded green chiles (about 6-8, or as many as you like)

3        tablespoons flour

1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes

2        quarts chicken or vegetable stock

Juice of 1/2 lime

About 2 cups dried posole, rinsed, soaked overnight and precooked, or 1 29-ounce can Mexican-style hominy

GARNISHES

Chopped cilantro

Sliced radishes

Shredded cabbage

Shredded Cotija (or other hard) cheese

Sour cream

Lime wedges

Directions

In a large Dutch oven, heat oil to medium high. Add onion and jalapeño, saute until golden. Add chicken, oregano, cumin, salt and pepper, cook chicken through.

Remove chicken and shred using two forks to pull apart. Return to pot, add garlic and green chiles, cook a minute more, then add flour. Cook, stirring, until flour has turned golden. Add tomatoes with their liquid, chicken stock, lime juice and posole. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer at least one hour (up to four).

If using a pressure cooker, bring to a boil, seal and cook about 1 hour. Chicken will be very tender and shred-able.

Serve with assorted garnishes.

 

From the Mesa Top: Feb 2, 2017

Climatology 2017:  The last round of storm was, in the end, really 5 of them in a row.  Each one colder than the one before.  Followed by a couple of the coldest days of the winter so far. A challenging week.

Then finally the storm track moved north and high pressure, dry air, crystal clear blue skies, and daily warmup in temperature have arrived.

We in agriculture always say “never curse the rain”, and we don’t!  This also means never curse the mud.  Even so, I do not think there will be any regrets expressed about the fact that for now at least the mud has dried out.

Meanwhile just 100 miles north of us, in the Costilla County, the Southeast portion of the San Luis Valley, a disaster area has been declared by Colorado governor as over 200% of typical annual snowfall has occurred already, mostly in January.  And it has stayed cold and blustery, so there has been plenty of drifting.

A warm and dry week is on the way.  A respite from the rugged weather as we step into February

From the Wild:  Nothing new from the wild world.  The warming weather should bring out the birds.

Cow stories:  The drainage in the main feed area worked.  Combined with dry air and warming temperatures the corals are not muddy and can be properly scraped and the manure piled up.

We have reached a conclusion over another recent cow adventure.  One of our intrepid momma cows has been a habitual fence crasher.  She lifts the third wire with her head/horns and steps over the second wire.  She has assembled a small group of protégés:  her calf and 2 same aged calves who were orphaned from their mommas.  The four wanderers have made it their mission to find the weak points in any fence they encounter.  The strange this is that while the rest of the cows happily lounge around and get fat on hay (we are very generous with them), these 4 leave for days at a time, end up 3 miles away, and of course they eventually find their way to the homes and properties of little suburbia, to the north of the farm.

For the last 2 weeks, we have made a series of fence improvements that have been effective for a day or two at a time at most, until the rascals find another way through.

The wanderers had become totally predictable.  All it took was a hoot and a holler or two and walking toward them and heading them south and they would walk straight home.  Seemed like a fairly minor inconvenience.

Unfortunately, the suburbanites are up in arms. These situations always come out the same:  Someone threatens the safety of the cows, and one or more accuse us of not caring about the problems cause by the bandito cows, and not being responsible.  This time is was questioning our will.  (really? farmers and ranchers have a deficit of will? Who knew?)  Another time we were told that we must be too poor to feed our cattle and that’s why we let them go onto other people’s property.  It’s been a bit daunting to wonder what kind of cyber-bullying our anti-agriculture neighbors would come up with next.

The thing of it is, there will always be cows getting through fences, even the very best fences.  A small calf will get through between the wires (why? Because it can), and momma will move heaven and earth and several fence posts and wire to get reunited.  Or a big bold bull will realize that there is some “work” to do on the other side of the fence and jump the thing and knock down the top wires and a few fence posts, and then a few adventurers will follow.  It is unavoidable.

The New Mexico Livestock Board is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the West.  In some ways 150 years ago, effective livestock related law enforcement was more important in the west than people-type law enforcement because people can defend themselves and livestock cannot.

New Mexico is a fence out state:  According to the law, if you don’t want cows on your property, build a fence.

Oh yeah, and emailed threats against the wellbeing of livestock is not a real clever idea…

Beneficial birds:  The pullets have moved to the big house!  Their next-door neighbors are the full-fledged laying hens.  No more heating bill.  Simplified chores too!  One less process to maintain.

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Uncategorized

 

Check out the Webstore:

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday February 2nd, 2017

Golden Turnips from Jubilee Farm

Salad Mix from Anthony Youth Farm

Delicata Squash from True to My Root’s Farm

Spinach from Preferred Produce

Grape Tomatoes from Preferred Produce

Pinto Beans from Akin Farm

Red Chili Powder from Seco Spice

March of the Chickens

It was time again for us to move the chicks we have been raising into their new home, in the main coop! Saturday the family was out getting these gals ready for their “big” move, only a few hundred feet, but it’s not as easy as a cattle drive. The chickens were caught in their brooding area, and placed in crates to be transported down to their own section of the main coop. They will be separated from the rest of the flock, so they aren’t picked on the bigger birds. We moved about 200 birds, with our flock size now around 1200. We are already getting ready for the next round of chicks, that will be coming in a week or two!

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CSA Recipes Needed:

We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

 

 

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Spaghetti Squash: On the marketplace

Butternut Squash: On the marketplace

Hubbard Squash: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Hamlin Juicing Oranges: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Black Spanish and Daikon Radishes: On the Marketplace

Cucumbers: On the Marketplace

Spinach: On the Marketplace

Green Lettuce: On the Marketplace

Kale: On the Marketplace

Salad Mix: On the Marketplace

Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

 

Crispy Golden Turnips 

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Ingredients

  • 2 Organic Turnips~Peeled and Chopped into Big Bite Size Pieces
  • 2 Cups Chicken Stock~Homemade or Organic Is Best
  • 1/4 Cup Organic Olive Oil
  • 2 Tbs Fat of Your Choice (Butter, Ghee, Bacon, Palm…)
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Parmesan Cheese~Freshly Grated

Instructions

  1. In A Sauce Pan Add Your Stock, Turnips and A Bit of Salt and Pepper and Bring to A Boil Then Turn Down to A Gentle Boil for About 15 Minutes.
  2. Transfer to A Sheet Pan and Toss with Olive Oil and A Touch More S &P.
  3. Let Bake in A 400 Degree Oven for About 15 Minutes (Turning Once Half Way Though).
  4. Remove and Toss Them into A Fry Pan with A Bit of Fat (I Used Pork Belly/Bacon) Let Them Get Crispy Golden Over Medium Heat-Figure About 10 Minutes; Again, Depends on How High Your Heat Is Set.
  5. Sprinkle with Freshly Grated Parmesan Cheese~So Good!!

 

ROASTED DELICATA SQUASH WITH TAHINI 

The rich tahini sauce perfectly complements the winter squash while providing heart benefits through oils in the sesame seeds. Serves 4-6.

  • 2-3 delicata squash (about 2 pounds)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • Juice from 1 lemon

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Clean squash well. Slice into rings 1/2-inch thick and remove seeds and pulp by slicing inner edge of squash rings.

Toss with 1 tablespoon oil and place on a baking sheet in a single layer. Sprinkle with one pinch of salt per pan and roast about 10-12 minutes on each side until soft and browned on edges.

While squash is roasting, blend remaining salt, olive oil, tahini, and lemon in a food processor or by hand until well blended.

Remove squash from oven, allow to cool slightly, and serve with tahini sauce for dipping.

 

Grape Tomato, Olive, and Spinach Pasta 

grape-tomato-olive-spinach-pasta-ck-x

Ingredients

8 ounces uncooked penne (about 2 cups)

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper

1 large garlic clove, thinly sliced

2 cups grape tomatoes, halved

1/2 cup organic vegetable broth (such as Swanson)

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

10 kalamata olives, pitted and coarsely chopped

4 cups baby spinach

1/4 cup torn basil leaves

1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated (about 1/4 cup)

Preparation

  1. Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil. Add pasta; cook 8 minutes or until al dente, omitting salt and fat. Drain in a colander over a bowl, reserving 1/2 cup cooking liquid.
  2. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add red pepper and garlic; sauté 30 seconds. Add tomatoes, broth, salt, black pepper, and olives; cook 6 minutes or until tomatoes begin to break down, stirring occasionally. Add pasta and 1/2 cup reserved cooking liquid to pan; simmer 2 minutes. Stir in spinach and basil; cook 2 minutes or until greens wilt. Divide pasta mixture evenly among 4 bowls; top with Parmesan cheese. Serve immediately.

 

 

SLOW COOKER NEW MEXICAN RED PORK CHILI 

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INGREDIENTS

  • 6 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 4 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic minced (about 2 tablespoons)
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken broth plus extra as needed
  • 1/2 cup brewed coffee
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 4 teaspoons dark brown sugar packed
  • 1/2 cup red bell pepper chopped
  • 2 pounds’ country-style pork ribs boneless, fat trimmed
  • kosher salt as needed
  • black pepper freshly ground, as needed
  • 15 ounces’ pinto beans drained, (1 can)
  • 1 cup corn kernels fresh or canned
  • 1/4 cup cilantro minced fresh, plus more for garnish
  • 1 teaspoon lime zest grated
  • 3 teaspoons lime juice

 

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Lightly oil inside of slow cooker with vegetable oil or cooking spray. Combine tomato paste, chili powder, oil, and garlic in a bowl and microwave, occasionally stirring until fragrant, about 1 minute. Transfer to prepared slow cooker. Whisk in broth, coffee, cornstarch and sugar. Add bell peppers.
  2. Generously season ribs with salt and pepper and nestle into slow cooker. Cover and cook until ribs are tender, and the meat falls apart with little resistance, 5 to 6 hours on low or 3 to 4 hours on high. Turn the ribs over halfway through cooking to ensure even braising.
  3. Using a large spoon, skim excess fat from surface of chili and discard. Remove pork and transfer to a plate. Break ribs into 1-inch pieces, removing any excess fat. Adjust chili consistency with extra hot broth as needed.
  4. Add back meat, beans and corn to the slow cooker. Cook on high for 30 minutes. Stir in cilantro, lime zest, and juice. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve with garnishes if desired.

RECIPE NOTES

1) Substitute decaffeinated coffee if you are concerned about the caffeine.
2) You can substitute 1 ½ teaspoons instant espresso in ½ cup boiling water for coffee.
3) Add more beans if you like an even heartier chili. Pinto, black, kidney and white beans can all be substituted or added.
4) Garnish Suggestions: Cilantro, shredded cheese, sliced jalapeno, serrano peppers, sour cream, red onion, limes, or avocado.

 

Crisp Wisps: Shaved white turnip and bok choy with golden oyster mushrooms and sesame drizzle 

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  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • fresh grinds of salt, to taste
  • 4 medium white turnips, greens removed and torn into bite-size pieces
  • 4 stems bok choy, greens removed and torn into bite-size pieces
  • 2 dozen small golden oyster mushrooms
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

Whisk together the vinegar and oil in a small bowl. Add a few grinds of salt, to taste. Set aside.

Use a mandoline to thinly slice the turnips and bok choy. Divide the turnips, bok choy and torn greens between 4 plates. Top with mushrooms and sesame seeds. Drizzle with sesame vinaigrette. Serve immediately.

Quinoa Salad with Baby Spinach and Grape Tomatoes 

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Ingredients:
Extra virgin olive oil

1 clove garlic, minced

About 1/2 to 2/3 cup cooked quinoa per person

1 generous cup washed organic baby spinach leaves per person

A handful of organic grape tomatoes per person, halved

1 scallion per person, washed, sliced

Sea salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste

Sprinkle of fresh or dried herbs- parsley, thyme, basil, or mint

Tiny sprinkle of nutmeg

Squeeze of fresh lemon juice or rice vinegar
Instructions:
Gently heat a large pan (I used a wok). Pour in some extra virgin olive oil. Add the garlic; stir and warm the oil for a minute.

Add the cooked quinoa and heat through. Add the baby spinach leaves, tomatoes and scallions. Season with sea salt and fresh ground pepper. Sprinkle with nutmeg and herbs. Stir to mix.

Sprinkle with lemon juice and stir. When the spinach begins to wilt remove from heat (I don’t like soggy spinach so I cook this very quickly).
Serve in a bowl.

 

Chicken & Pinto Bean Chili 

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  • 8 dried red chiles, such as New Mexico red, stemmed and seeded (roughly 1 chili equals 1 TBS, little under some times)
  • 1 Tbs. cumin seeds
  • 1-1/2 Tbs. fresh oregano leaves or 2 tsp. dried
  • 1 lb. dried pinto beans, soaked overnight and drained
  • 3 medium yellow onions, chopped
  • 2 large carrots, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3 fresh jalapeños (preferably red), stemmed, seeded, and chopped
  • 2 lb. skinless chicken thighs
  • 2 Tbs. salt
  • Shredded sharp Cheddar or Cotija cheese for garnish

Cover the chiles with about 4 cups boiling water and steep until soft, about 15 minutes. Reserve 2 cups of the soaking liquid and then drain the chiles. In a blender, purée the chiles with the reserved liquid.

Meanwhile, toast and grind the cumin seeds and toast the oregano as described at left (don’t toast dried oregano). Put the beans in a stockpot and cover them with 7 cups water. Add the chile purée, toasted ground cumin, toasted (or dried) oregano, onions, carrot, garlic, jalapeños, and chicken thighs. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer, skimming any foam. Remove the chicken thighs when cooked, 25 to 30 minutes. When the chicken is cool enough to handle, pull the meat from the bones into large pieces and set aside; discard the bones. Continue cooking the beans until tender, another 1 to 1-1/2 hours. Return the chicken to the pot to heat it thoroughly. Season with the salt, adding more to taste. Serve in bowls topped with the grated cheese.

 

From the Mesa Top: Feb 2, 2017

Climatology 2017:  The last round of storm was, in the end, really 5 of them in a row.  Each one colder than the one before.  Followed by a couple of the coldest days of the winter so far. A challenging week.

Then finally the storm track moved north and high pressure, dry air, crystal clear blue skies, and daily warmup in temperature have arrived.

We in agriculture always say “never curse the rain”, and we don’t!  This also means never curse the mud.  Even so, I do not think there will be any regrets expressed about the fact that for now at least the mud has dried out.

Meanwhile just 100 miles north of us, in the Costilla County, the Southeast portion of the San Luis Valley, a disaster area has been declared by Colorado governor as over 200% of typical annual snowfall has occurred already, mostly in January.  And it has stayed cold and blustery, so there has been plenty of drifting.

A warm and dry week is on the way.  A respite from the rugged weather as we step into February

From the Wild:  Nothing new from the wild world.  The warming weather should bring out the birds.

Cow stories:  The drainage in the main feed area worked.  Combined with dry air and warming temperatures the corals are not muddy and can be properly scraped and the manure piled up.

We have reached a conclusion over another recent cow adventure.  One of our intrepid momma cows has been a habitual fence crasher.  She lifts the third wire with her head/horns and steps over the second wire.  She has assembled a small group of protégés:  her calf and 2 same aged calves who were orphaned from their mommas.  The four wanderers have made it their mission to find the weak points in any fence they encounter.  The strange this is that while the rest of the cows happily lounge around and get fat on hay (we are very generous with them), these 4 leave for days at a time, end up 3 miles away, and of course they eventually find their way to the homes and properties of little suburbia, to the north of the farm.

For the last 2 weeks, we have made a series of fence improvements that have been effective for a day or two at a time at most, until the rascals find another way through.

The wanderers had become totally predictable.  All it took was a hoot and a holler or two and walking toward them and heading them south and they would walk straight home.  Seemed like a fairly minor inconvenience.

Unfortunately, the suburbanites are up in arms. These situations always come out the same:  Someone threatens the safety of the cows, and one or more accuse us of not caring about the problems cause by the bandito cows, and not being responsible.  This time is was questioning our will.  (really? farmers and ranchers have a deficit of will? Who knew?)  Another time we were told that we must be too poor to feed our cattle and that’s why we let them go onto other people’s property.  It’s been a bit daunting to wonder what kind of cyber-bullying our anti-agriculture neighbors would come up with next.

The thing of it is, there will always be cows getting through fences, even the very best fences.  A small calf will get through between the wires (why? Because it can), and momma will move heaven and earth and several fence posts and wire to get reunited.  Or a big bold bull will realize that there is some “work” to do on the other side of the fence and jump the thing and knock down the top wires and a few fence posts, and then a few adventurers will follow.  It is unavoidable.

The New Mexico Livestock Board is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the West.  In some ways 150 years ago, effective livestock related law enforcement was more important in the west than people-type law enforcement because people can defend themselves and livestock cannot.

New Mexico is a fence out state:  According to the law, if you don’t want cows on your property, build a fence.

Oh yeah, and emailed threats against the wellbeing of livestock is not a real clever idea…

Beneficial birds:  The pullets have moved to the big house!  Their next-door neighbors are the full-fledged laying hens.  No more heating bill.  Simplified chores too!  One less process to maintain.

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of January 26th, 2017

 

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday January 26th, 2017

Sunchokes from Sol Harvest

Red Russian Kale from Anthony Youth Farm

Cilantro from Anthony Youth Farm

Black Spanish Radishes from Vida Verde

Purple Potatoes from Jubilee Farm

Vine-Ripe Tomatoes from Preferred Produce

 

What’s New

As we mentioned in our Egg-cellent update, when Edible was doing the interview with us on our eggs, it was by a fellow farmer some might be familiar with. Farmer Ric of Sol Harvest came up a few weeks back to see our farm, and it only seemed fair we pay his farm a visit as well! Last Wednesday, we went to Ric farm which is located right behind Farm and Table, one of the culinary monuments of our state. I have had the privilege of dinning at Farm and Table twice, and each time I was transported to a world of bliss, both in atmosphere and delight for my taste buds. They are dedicated to local, seasonal foods, and every dish they create is a testament to their commitment.

Of course, a chef that has a farm literally in their back yard does have a leg up on the freshest, locally grown food one can ask for. Sol Harvest is invested in community support and education, which really shines through when you visit their farm, whether for dinner or just to say hi. They created and maintain an interactive farm environment, with well-maintained walk ways and signs so families can tour the farm while they are waiting for dinner, while ensuring their crops are safe from trampling. The highlight would have to be their 50’ green house, which was recently doubled in size from Kickstarter support. The key to year-round growing relies a great deal on the greenhouse, though there are still a few crops out in the field as Ric pointed out on my tour. Some lingering kale and chard were still out in the field, in addition to the sunchokes which take a featured spot in our share this week. The greenhouse was about 75% full of covered produce, an entire section dedicated to herbs for the kitchen, chard, kale and salad greens. We also popped into the propagation house, where the new seeds are being germinated and sprouted, to await their place in the field. As I started my tour, we visited an intern that was filling a wheelbarrow full of fresh compost, from one of the staged composting areas, which later we say her laying down in the next bed to be planted.

This wonderful farm visit was only made more special as a flock of guinea hens came running across the field towards Ric and me, in search of some tasty food. Ric explained that the flock were an excellent free-range pest and weed patrol crew, that eat the weed seeds as well as keep grasshoppers and other pests off the crops in the warmer months. Even more impressive, was as the flock started to move further down the field (towards a neighbor that has bird seed in her yard that they love), Ric whistles and starts calling these little gals back to their field, which they did!

guinea_hens

Farm and Table Guinea Hen 

We are pleased to now incorporate Sol Harvest’s produce into our csa, with Sunchokes this week, and some fun future plans in the mix.

 

CSA Recipes Needed:

We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

 

 

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Spaghetti Squash: On the marketplace

Butternut Squash: On the marketplace

Hubbard Squash: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Hamlin Juicing Oranges: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Black Spanish and Daikon Radishes: On the Marketplace

Cucumbers: On the Marketplace

Spinach: On the Marketplace

Green Lettuce: On the Marketplace

Kale: On the Marketplace

Salad Mix: On the Marketplace

Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

 

Potato, Celery Root and Sunchoke Cream with Purple Potato Chips 

makes enough for 4 servings

3 Tbs olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 leek, diced
1 medium celery root, peeled and diced
2 sunchokes, peeled and diced
4 medium potatoes, peeled and diced
2 springs of fresh thyme
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 qt chicken or vegetable stock
1/4 cup coconut milk
1 purple potato, thinly sliced
olive oil to fry

In a large pot, sauté the garlic and leeks in the olive oil for about 1-2 minutes. Do not want to brown them, just sweat them. Add the diced root vegetables, thyme, salt and pepper and sauté for another minute.

Add the chicken stock (enough to cover) and bring it to a boil. Simmer and cover the pot. Cook the soup for about 20 minutes and then puree it. Add the coconut milk and adjust seasoning.

In the meantime, slice the purple potato with a mandolin or a super sharp knife (mandolin works best). heat the olive oil and fry the potatoes for about 1 minute until they crisp up. Drain them on paper towels and season with salt and fresh thyme.

 

Russian Kale Casserole Recipe 

1 bunch Red Russian Kale, chopped, or use any other variety of kale
1/2 red onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced (1/2 tsp. teaspoon minced garlic)
1/2 tsp. olive oil
1 tsp. Tamari or other soy sauce
1 C grated cheese (I used a blend of low-fat cheese called Pizza Cheese which has mozzarella, provolone, Romano, and parmesan)
1/4 cup 100% whole wheat bread crumbs (optional; I’ve made this successfully without the bread crumbs)
6 eggs, beaten well
1/2 tsp. Spike Seasoning

Preheat oven to 350F. Cut off kale stems and discard, then wash kale leaves and dry well. (I used a salad spinner.) Pile kale leaves up on top of each other and cut into strips about 3/4-inch-wide, then turn cutting board the other way and cut again so you have squares just under an inch square. Chop onion into pieces about 1/2 inch.

Heat olive oil in large heavy frying pan, then add onions and sauté 3 minutes. Add garlic and sauté about 2 more minutes, then add kale, turning over as it wilts and sautéing about 5 minutes, or until kale is significantly wilted and softened. Put sautéed vegetables into large bowl and add Tamari, cheese, bread crumbs, beaten eggs, and Spike seasoning.

Stir gently until ingredients are well distributed. Spray pen with olive oil or nonstick spray and pour in egg mixture. (I was cooking it in my Oster Toaster Oven, and used a pan that’s 11.5 X 7.5 inches.) Bake 20-25 minutes until eggs are well set and the top is lightly browned. Serve hot. This is good with low-fat sour cream or salsa.

 

Fresh Tomato Salsa 

  • 1 1/2 lbs. firm, ripe tomatoes, cut into 3/8” dice (about 3 cups)
  • 1 large jalapeño chile, seeded (seeds reserved and minced; see note), flesh minced (about 2 tbl.)
  • 1/2 cup minced red onion
  • 1 small garlic clove, minced (about 1/2 tsp.)
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • pinch ground black pepper
  • 2 – 6 tsp. fresh lime juice
  • Sugar to taste (up to 1 tsp.)

 

Apple-Sunchoke Salad with Smoked Trout and Cider Vinaigrette 

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Ingredients

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided

2 pounds sunchokes, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices

1/4 cup chopped fresh dill

1 tablespoon chopped shallots

2 tablespoons unfiltered apple cider

2 1/2 tablespoons cider vinegar

1 cup halved, cored, and thinly sliced Granny Smith apples

1 cup halved, cored, and thinly sliced Honeycrisp apples

6 ounces skinned smoked trout, broken into 1/2-inch pieces

2 tablespoons sliced fresh basil

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°.
  2. Combine 1 tablespoon oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and sunchokes in a large bowl; toss to coat. Spread sunchokes, cut sides down, on a baking sheet; bake at 400° for 25 minutes or just until tender and golden. Cool completely.
  3. Combine dill, shallots, apple cider, cider vinegar, remaining 2 tablespoons oil, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in a large bowl. Add apples and sunchokes; toss gently. Place on a serving plate. Top with trout and basil.

 

 

Directions

Set large colander in large bowl.  Place tomatoes in colander and let drain 30 minutes.  As tomatoes drain, layer jalapeño, onion, garlic, and cilantro on top.  Shake colander to drain off excess tomato juice.  Discard juice; wipe out bowl.

Transfer contents of colander to now-empty bowl.  Add salt, pepper and 2 tsp. lime juice; toss to combine.  Taste and add minced jalapeño seeds, sugar, and additional lime juice to taste.

Note:      Heat varies from jalapeño to jalapeño, and because much of the heat resides in the seeds, mince seeds separately from the flesh, then add minced seeds to taste.  The amount of sugar and lime juice to use depends on the ripeness of the tomatoes.  The salsa can be made 2 to 3 hours in advance, but hold off adding the salt, lime juice, and sugar until just before serving.  The salsa is perfect for tortilla chips, but it’s also a nice accompaniment to grilled steaks, chicken, and fish.

 

Purple Potato Pizza with Sausage and Kale 

purple-potato-pizza-with-sausage-and-kale-11

To Make the Pizza:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup chopped kale
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped fine
  • 1/2 lb. browned sausage
  • 6-8 small purple potatoes
  • 1-1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 2 teaspoons Black Truffle Oil (or olive oil)

Preheat oven to 425.

Brown sausage with garlic and drain excess fat, reserving a small amount of fat in the pan.  To the pan add chopped kale and sauté until wilted.  Wash purple potatoes and put in a pot, covered with cold water.  Bring to a boil and boil for 8-10 minutes until tender.  Drain, and allow to cool.  Thinly slice the purple potatoes once cooled.

Once dough has risen and is shaped, prepare your pizza.  Using a pastry brush, brush the Black Truffle Oil (or olive oil) over the dough.  Add the mozzarella cheese, sausage, kale and thinly sliced purple potatoes.  Place in a preheated 425 oven for approximately 20 minutes.

 

Brown Butter-Sunchoke Soup With Brussels Sprouts and Bacon Recipe 

INGREDIENTS

  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 2 pounds sunchokes (also sold as Jerusalem artichokes), skin-on, scrubbed, and cut into 1/2-inch disks
  • 1 large leek, white and pale green parts only, split in half, washed and sliced into half-inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion, finely sliced (about 1 cup)
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, minced (about 2 teaspoons)
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh sage leaves
  • 6 cups low-sodium homemade or store-bought chicken broth
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/4-pound bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Dash sherry or white wine vinegar
  • 1/2-pound brussels sprouts, split in half

DIRECTIONS

Melt butter in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat, swirling constantly until it is a deep brown and has a nutty aroma, about 1 1/2 minutes. Add sunchokes and stir. Cook, stirring occasionally, until sunchokes are well browned on all surfaces and starting to lightly char, about 10 minutes. Add leeks and onions and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes longer. Add garlic and sage and cook, stirring constantly, until aromatic, about 1 minute. Add chicken stock and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook until sunchokes are tender, about ten minutes. Discard bay leaves.

 

While soup simmers, place bacon in a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until brown and crisp, about 10 minutes. Transfer bacon to a bowl, leaving fat in the skillet. Set aside.

 

Working in batches, puree soup in a blender on high speed until completely smooth, about 2 minutes per batch. Transfer to a large saucepot, straining through a fine mesh strainer if a smoother soup is desired. When all batches are pureed, season to taste with salt and pepper. Whisk in vinegar, a teaspoon at a time, until desired flavor is reached (about 1 tablespoon total). Keep soup warm.

 

Reheat the bacon fat over high heat until sizzling, then add the brussels sprouts, cut-side-down into the skillet. Cook without moving until well-charred, about 3 minutes. Toss and continue to cook, tossing and stirring occasionally, until tender and well browned, about 6 minutes total. Return bacon to skillet and toss to combine. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and a dash of vinegar. Remove from heat and set aside.

 

Serve hot soup in bowls, garnished with sautéed brussels sprouts and bacon, and drizzled with bacon fat or olive oil.

 

Kale Guacamole 

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 to 4 big leaves of curly green kale (the Tuscan/lacinato variety also works well)
  • 4 medium ripe avocados, halved and pitted
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons lime juice (about 1½ medium limes), divided, to taste
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt, to taste
  • ⅓ cup roughly chopped red onion
  • ¼ cup roughly chopped fresh cilantro, lightly packed
  • 1 small jalapeño, seeds and membranes removed, roughly chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. To prepare the kale, first remove the tough ribs with a chef’s knife and discard them. Chop the kale into small, bite-sized pieces. Sprinkle it lightly with salt, followed by a squeeze of lime juice (about 1 teaspoon). Massage the kale by scrunching it up in your hands, repeating until the kale is darker green and fragrant (this step softens the kale and makes it less bitter). You’ll need 1 cup (packed) kale for the guacamole, so measure it out and set it aside.
  2. Next, use a spoon to scoop the flesh of the avocados into the bowl of a food processor, discarding any bruised, browned areas. Add 3 tablespoons lime juice and the salt. Blend until the mixture is fairly smooth, pausing to scrape down the sides as necessary.
  3. Add the massaged kale, onion, cilantro and jalapeño. Blend until the mixture is mostly smooth, with only tiny bits of kale and onion remaining (or completely smooth, if you prefer). Taste, and add additional salt and/or lime juice, if necessary, and blend again (I usually add up to ½ teaspoon more salt and another tablespoon of lime juice). Serve immediately.

 

Farrotto With Acorn Squash and Red Russian Kale 

20141015-heritage-farroto-with-squash-and-kale-peter-frank-edwards

This farrotto—farro cooked in the style of risotto—from Sean Brock’s new cookbook, Heritage, is the perfect foil to the artfully composed, modernist plates that make up most of the book: it’s a warming, rustic potful of fall flavors.

He takes the same level of care here as he does with those multi-component dishes, however, and this is not a throw-it-together meal. Much of the flavor comes from his homemade, fennel-rich vegetable stock, and as tempting as it is to skip that time-consuming step, I wouldn’t recommend it. After that’s squared away, acorn squash is roasted and blended with some of the stock, resulting in a silky, aromatic purée that I would be happy to eat all on its own. Farro, preferably Anson Mills, is then toasted and attentively stirred with onion, garlic, wine and the stock for about an hour, until creamy and tender (though it retains that hearty farro chew). Ribbons of kale are added to wilt gently throughout, and the squash purée, butter and Parmigiano cheese melt into the farrotto, turning it to velvet.

Why I picked this recipe: It’s so, so perfect for fall.

What worked: I loved eating this for days! The squash purée provides autumnal flavor and the silkiest texture, which is a counterpoint to the toothsome farro and slightly crunchy kale. The vegetable broth infuses the pot with layers of vegetal flavor through and through.

What didn’t: My squash needed 10 more minutes in the oven than the time suggested, but follow his directive to cook until fork-tender (erring on the side of more done rather than less), and you’ll be fine. I found it a bit irritating that the recipe calls for 2 quarts plus 1 cup of the Vegetable Stock, though the stock recipe only makes 2 quarts.

Suggested tweaks: I made 1 1/2-times the stock recipe, and got about 2 cups less than the 3 quarts I should have ended up with; if you want any stock left over, go ahead and double the recipe. If you have another stock on hand that you love, you could use that, but know that the flavor of the stock will be predominant in the final dish. Once again, I cheated and did not use Anson Mills farro, which I’m sure would have made this even more delicious; however, it worked great with the farro I had on hand. As to tweaking the flavors, Brock says in the recipe’s intro: “Here I pair farrotto with fall flavors, but it can be a vehicle for whatever looks great at the farmers’ market. Just keep in mind that farrotto brings a bit more heft to the plate than a traditional risotto.”

Potatoes Saute in Garlic and Cilantro 

potatoes-saute-with-garlic-and-cilantro

Ingredients

  • 4 large potatoes
  • 1 bunch green cilantro (or ½ cup dried cilantro leaves)
  • 5-8 large fresh garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 3 table spoons of olive oil
  • A dash of salt

Instructions

  1. Slice the potatoes into small cubes of about ¾ inch with a thickness of about ½ inch. Fry them in oil until they are golden/crispy (or alternatively bake them in the oven until they’re crispy). Salt them lightly.
  2. Meanwhile rinse the cilantro leaves then discard the stems, and chop the leaves very finely. Lay the leaves on a paper towel for a few minutes to dry the water from them.
  3. In a deep-frying pan, add the crushed garlic then sauté it on medium heat in the 3 tablespoons of olive oil just for a couple of minutes. You want the garlic to stay a bit raw, not fully cooked, or otherwise if you overcook the garlic it looses its flavor.
  4. Add a tiny pinch of salt, then add the chopped cilantro and the lemon juice to the garlic and sauté/mix them well for a minute or two.
  5. Finally add the fried potatoes to the pot, mix it well with the sauté and cook it for 3-5 more minutes while stirring, and you’re done.
  6. BONUS: If you love spicy food, finely chop a bit of green jalapeno or Serrano peppers and add them during the cilantro sauté
  7. Serve hot or cold as an appetizer.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: Jan 26, 2017

Climatology 2017:  The predictions of the NOAA meteorologist continue to be spot on.  Last week’s storms have been a one-two-three punch.  Each storm colder than the last.  This trend has deposited more snow at 7000 feet elevation.  After storm #3 we are expecting a cold and dry spell.

From the Wild:  A big buck was seen crossing the county road up near the edge of the mesa.

Cow stories:  The muck has been alleviated by digging a “drain” to help move the soggiest material out of the feeding area.  Another area has been opened up for the cows to use when they are not feeding, which is not entirely deep in mud.

We had a great adventure getting hay in on Friday morning, as a mere inch of snow early that morning left portions of the road in slippery condition.  The hay supplier is a new one for us, recommended by a neighbor rancher.  Once he realized that we were truly out of hay (having fed the last of our inventory on Thursday night) he resolved to get us taken care of.

We had to get him in as soon as the icy portion of the paved mesa climb was thawed, and then we had to get him unloaded so he could get back off the mesa before the snow on the dirt road turned to mud.

We were successful, and now we have a few weeks’ worth of hay on hand.  The cows seemed very relieved to see new stacks of big bales.

Beneficial birds:  The pullets continue to be healthy and vigorous.  Their feed is getting closer to the ration of the adult laying hens.  We .re keeping an eye out for the best time to move them to the big chicken house, which will likely be during the next warmup that does not include threat of precipitation,

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of January 19th, 2017

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday January 19th, 2017

Cantaloupe from Preferred Produce

French D’avignon Radishes from Anthony Youth Farm

Green Cabbage, Half from Cerro Vista

Purple Turnips from Frisco Farm

Mini Cucumbers from Silverleaf Farm

Butternut Squash from Mesa Top Farm

We had a little trouble last week with kale, we only received enough for about half the shares, and credited those who did not get it. Additionally, we ended up using jarred pears instead of peaches, something we are hoping to add to the marketplace if there are any left! Other than that, it has been a fun week of planning. Mesa Top’s next batch of chicks have just about grown up enough to move out of the brooding area and into their section of the main chicken coop, more room for them as they continue to grow to maturity. This means that MT is already looking at its next round of chicks, as we continue to grow the flock.

We had a phone call with Seashaken as well, mapping out the rest of our plans for salmon till the next season. We are pleased to share that Blue Corn Brewery has been carrying our fish on the menu for a while now, and it looks like we are a permanent dish! Try Chef David’s Grilled Salmon pepitas-crusted and seared with rosemary & tomato orzo and garlic green beans. Zinc in ABQ is also putting our Coho back on the menu for the next 3 months, Chef Chris has yet to update the menu online, but we have great faith in his creative talent. Café Pasqual’s still has their staple Gravlax on the menu, but we will be discussing a dish with our King salmon in the coming weeks! The final exciting update is that it looks like La Montanita Coop in Santa Fe is going to try carrying our Coho in their seafood case, which would be an amazing partnership to offer our fish every day of the week! Bit by bit, we keep seeing our community supported fishery grown , and more people falling in love with it.

 

Egg-xcellent Updates

When Steve founded our family farm back in 1994, it was with the vision of raising fresh, pesticide free produce, cattle and of course our Beneficial Eggs. For over 20 years, the farm has grown and changed, but our core foundation has only been improved through the decades. Of all the different directions the farm has taken, we have really focused on certain core areas. We grow massive amounts of summer and winter squash, continue to grow our Ayrshire cattle herd for both meat and milk that goes into our cheese, and of course our eggs.

2016 may have been a disruptive year in many ways, but for us, it was when the stars aligned and we applied for and received a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture for Value Added Producers. Value Added products are where a farmer or ranchers producers a raw commodity and turns it into a product with more value. Along with us, Old Windmill Dairy and La Mesa Org (our juice partner in Dixon) also received grants to further develop their operations and products, so NM is really on a hot streak! The La Montanita Cooperative Distribution Center was able to hire a Benjamin Bartley in the spring of 2016 under a USDA grant, as their Value Chain Specialist. Ben has been a major benefit to our food community, and has worked with Steve and Thomas throughout this grant process to help navigate the challenging grant stipulations, as well as helping OWD in the same capacity.

It is only fitting that 2017 is the year of the Rooster on the Chinese Calendar, because for us, it is the year of the egg! With the support of our grant, we are hard at work taking Beneficial Eggs to the next level. We will be updating our retail cartons, to reflect more current information about our eggs, as well as marketing efforts and website upgrades. The grant also allows us to hire a representative for our product, that will greatly help us grow and maintain a presence for the Beneficial Eggs. The third major part of the grant is for equipment to upgrade our value adding capacity. This will be used for an egg washing machine, an egg grader (weigher) and salmonella testing. Right now, all our eggs are washed by hand, which only works to a certain level and our cartons of eggs are hand weighed to ensure that each dozen is the correct average egg weight. These two machines will be crucial with our growth, because it already takes a considerable about of time to perform these tasks at a smaller scale. Grading our eggs also makes sure we are following laws for selling our eggs to restaurants.

Here at the farm, we are kicking things into full throttle, as much as we can. We have 250 chickens being raised, with plans of doing 2 more 250 chick-raising rounds this year, adding to our flock of around 1000 currently. We are looking at ways to increase our chicken’s coops, to accommodate and plan for our growth, I wouldn’t be surprised if we have 3000 chickens by the 2019. We have also reignited an old partnership with vigor, with a second egg producer now being a part of the Beneficial brand. 3V Trust worked with us last year to start growing our supply chain, and as of last week, we are back in full swing. 3V is a group of farmers in San Luis Valley, at the head of our Rio Grande River watershed that raise free range chickens in keeping with the same standards our eggs are produced in. For any of our more detailed readers, we are happy to share our agreement for satellite egg producers, it is a very well thought out document covering everything from feed, animal welfare and regulations. We do not take working with another producer lightly, since we are very proud of the high quality of egg we produce from our happy chickens, so our trust in Vicente’s practices very strong. The need to incorporate additional producers for Beneficial comes down to the demand, and a single farm’s ability to raise happy free-range chickens. Without starting to try marketing our eggs, we already have a demand of over 5500 eggs every week, which far exceeds what our gals can lay, so many customers have been without our eggs. As of last week, we could get 225 dozen eggs into the La Montantia stores with our 3V partnership, and for the stores that have been out of our eggs for a month, it was like Christmas again.

All this amazing, egg-xciting work that has been going on behind the scenes was only furthered by a request to interview us! “Put An Egg On It” will be the title of the upcoming article written by Farmer Ric of Sol Harvest Farm in Edible Magazine. We were very pleasantly surprised by Edible reaching out to us because they were looking to do an article on local egg producers, and even more so to have a fellow farmer visit our farm to write the article. I won’t spoil the story, but just know that our family was borderline in tears with how great we sound on paper, we spend so much time in the day-to-day, that hearing an outside prospective really helps affirm our efforts.  I am trying to get copies of the issue to put in shares when it comes out.

At this point, I am sure you are egg-xhausted with the puns and updates, and I am running out of details to share. I wanted to share these amazing developments, that we are very grateful for and are working very hard to make the most out of. After we received the grant, Steve and I looked at our goals, and believe we can achieve in 2 years what we are supposed to do in 3, and then keep going from there. I spent 4 years of my career working in grant funded work, and there are times where grant money doesn’t do as much good as it is intended, but this grant is one I have complete confidence in it making a huge impact in the way it was intended!

 

CSA Recipes Needed:

We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

 

 

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Spaghetti Squash: On the marketplace

Butternut Squash: On the marketplace

Hubbard Squash: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Navel Oranges: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Black Spanish and Daikon Radishes: On the Marketplace

Cucumbers: On the Marketplace

Spinach: On the Marketplace

Green Lettuce: On the Marketplace

Kale: On the Marketplace

Salad Mix: On the Marketplace

Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

 

French Breakfast Radish Salad 

radishsalad

 

1 bunch of French Breakfast Radishes

1 T Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1-2 tsp Cider Vinegar

Salt (used Pink and Gray salts, but Sea Salt would work too)

Black Pepper

1 T fresh Parsley (flat leaf) Chopped

 

  1. Remove tops from radishes, and wash in cold water to rub off the dirt. Slice each lengthwise in half.
  2. Bring a pot of water to a boil, and just blanch the radishes (drop in radishes, leave for 2 minutes).
  3. Drain and rinse radishes immediately in cold water.
  4. Transfer radishes to a bowl, and drizzle with Olive Oil, 1-2 tsp cider vinegar, salt and pepper to taste.
    5. Toss with fresh parsley and serve in a bowl garnished with sprigs of parsley.

Hot & Sour Soup with Mushroom, Cabbage, and Rice 

cabbage-soup

Serves 8 to 10 (1-cup servings)

1 tablespoon canola oil
4 ounces cremini or shiitake mushroom caps, thinly sliced
1 to 3 jalapeno peppers, finely diced
6 cloves garlic, minced
3-inch piece ginger, grated (or 1 tablespoon ginger puree)
1 to 3 limes, zested and juiced
8 cups chicken broth (or turkey or vegetable)
1/2 cup jasmine rice
2 tablespoons soy sauce (or tamari, if gluten-free), plus more to serve
1/2 small head green cabbage, cut in half and shaved thin
Chili garlic sauce or kimchi, to serve

Heat the oil in a large heavy pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and cook for 5 minutes without stirring. Stir the mushrooms after 5 minutes and cook for 5 more minutes, or until well-browned. Add the diced peppers, garlic, and ginger and cook for about 5 minutes, or until fragrant and slightly softened.

Add the lime zest and broth and bring to a simmer. Add the rice, cover, and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the rice is just barely soft. Add the shaved cabbage, lime juice, and soy sauce and simmer for another few minutes, or until cabbage is hot. Taste and add more lime juice, soy sauce, or other seasonings to taste.

Serve with extra soy sauce, lime wedges, and kimchi or chili garlic sauce.

Lime n’ Cantaloupe Margarita Muffins 

Ingredients

Dry:

  • 2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1.5 t baking soda
  • 2 t aluminum-free baking powder
  • 1/4 t fine grain sea salt
  • 1/2 cup organic cane sugar

Wet:

  • 1 cup diced cantaloupe
  • Flax egg: 1 T ground flax + 3 T warm water (replaces 1 egg)
  • 1 t pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup non-dairy milk
  • 1 t lime juice

Filling:

  • 1/3-1/2 cup sweetened yogurt (I used unsweetened soygurt + agave)

Garnish:

  • Lime zest

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. Grease muffin tin.
  3. Whisk ground flax and water in a small/medium bowl and let it set for a few minutes.
  4. In a large bowl, mix the dry ingredients together.
  5. Take the smaller bowl with the flax in it and whisk again.
  6. Now add the rest of the wet ingredients to the flax mixture. Whisk well.
  7. Now add the wet mixture to the dry and stir until just incorporated.
  8. Spoon 1 heaping tablespoon of batter into the muffin tin.
  9. Now add a dollop of the yogurt on top and follow it with another tablespoon of batter on top.
  10. Repeat for the remaining 11 muffins.
  11. Garnish with lime zest.
  12. Bake for 18 – 20 minutes.

 

French Breakfast Radish Omelet 

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Ingredients

Farm fresh local wild leeks

Farm fresh local French breakfast radishes
Wild leek infused olive oil
Sea salt
Ground pepper
Farm fresh local oregano
Farm fresh local chives
Farm fresh local eggs Local fromange blanc

Directions

Per omelette, slice two leek whites and four french breakfast radishes. Warm one half teaspoon wild leek oil in a medium metal saute pan, add leek whites, radishes, season with salt and pepper, cook for two minutes and remove from pan.

Remove oregano leaves from stems and mince one teaspoon per omelette. Mince one teaspoon chives per omelette (reserve chive blossoms). Add two-three egg whites to the warm medium metal saute pan with one half teaspoon wild leek oil, cook a few minutes until sides have firmed. Flip over omelette, add one tablespoon fromange blanc, leek whites, radishes, herbs and cook for another minute.

Plate omelette by folding over egg whites and top with a few minced chives. Garnish with chive blossoms.

Chicken & sage biscuit pot pie with cremini mushrooms & purple top turnip 

Adapted from Blue Apron Recipe

I loved this recipe I found on Blue Apron using turnips in a chicken and biscuit recipe, but their online version will need a bit of tweeking to make at home. I can’t tell the exact measurements on all things, but given the size of their baking dish, I am listing at least double what they used.

  • Carrots, 1 – 1.5lb
  • Celery 4-5 stalks
  • chicken breasts – 3-4 breasts, or you could use a whole chicken from Mesa Top roasted
  • Sour Cream and milk, maybe about 8 oz of sour cream and adding milk while
  • red onions
  • cremini mushrooms 8 oz
  • buttermilk biscuit mix, enough for 8-12 biscuits, homemade or store mix
  • purple-topped turnips about 2 decent sized ones
  • chicken demiglace – Chicken bullion should work well
  • additional seasoning to taste, sage and rosemary
  • All Purpose flour

As you are working on this dish, keep in mind I estimated what it will take to make a larger sized dish with ingredients easier to find. It is important to have enough meat and vegetables to cover the bottom of your baking dish at least 1” deep, and then to take your time flavoring your sauce to your taste, then mixing in flour to thicken it to a gravy consistency. Your choice in biscuits will depend on your skills, if you make amazing home made biscuits, awesome, but if you feel that a store mix or premade biscuits are good enough, it will still be good.

 

Poach & shred the chicken:

In a medium pot, combine the chickena big pinch of salt and enough water to cover the chicken by 2 inches; heat to boiling on high. Once boiling, remove from heat and cover with a lid or foil. Let stand for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through. Thoroughly drain the poached chicken and transfer to a cutting board. Using 2 forks, carefully shred into bite-sized pieces.

Prepare the ingredients:

While the chicken poaches, preheat the oven to 450°F. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Peel and medium dice the turnip. Cut the mushrooms into bite-sized pieces. Thinly slice the celery crosswise. Peel the carrot and thinly slice into rounds. Pick the sage leaves off the stems; discard the stems and thinly slice the leaves.

Cook the vegetables:

While the chicken continues to poach, in a large pot, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, 3 to 5 minutes, or until browned. Add the carrotcelery and turnip; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 3 to 5 minutes, or until tender.

Make the filling:

Add the flour and 2 tablespoons of olive oil to the pot of vegetables; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until the flour is golden. Add the crème fraîchedemi-glacehalf the sage and 1½ cups of water; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 3 to 5 minutes, or until the liquid has thickened. Stir in the shredded chicken; season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook, stirring frequently, 1 to 2 minutes, or until thoroughly combined and heated through. Transfer to a baking dish.

Make the biscuit batter:

While the filling cooks, in a medium bowl, combine the biscuit mix and remaining sage; season with salt and pepper. Gradually stir in ⅓ cup of cold water until just combined.

Finish the pot pie & serve your dish:

Using a spoon, top the baking dish of filling with equal-sized scoops of the biscuit batter, leaving some space between the scoops. Place the baking dish on a sheet pan and bake 12 to 14 minutes, or until the biscuits are golden brown and cooked through. Remove from the oven. Let stand for at least 2 minutes before serving. Enjoy!

 

Green Cabbage Kimchi 

kimchi

Ingredients

  1. 1 large head (about 3.5 lb) green cabbage
  2. 4 tablespoons coarse sea salt
  3. 3 cloves garlic
  4. 1/2-inch piece ginger
  5. 3 tablespoons anchovy sauce
  6. 2 tablespoons cooked white rice (short grain preferred) *
  7. 6 tablespoons water
  8. 7 tablespoons Korean chili flakes
  9. 1 tablespoon shrimp sauce
  10. 1 tablespoon sugar
  11. 3 green onion, chopped
  12. 1/2 to 1 cup water

Instructions

  1. Cut and dice the cabbage into 1-1/2 inch pieces. Try to separate the cabbage layers. Rinse them well and place them in a large mixing bowl. Sprinkle sea salt over and toss well. Let them sit for 2 hour turning once or twice during the time.
  2. Rinse the cabbage once and drain well. Set aside.
  3. In a blender, combine garlic, ginger, anchovy sauce, cooked rice, and the 6 tablespoons of water. Puree them until very smooth.
  4. In a large mixing bowl, combine Korean chili flakes, shrimp sauce, sugar, and the rice puree. Mix well. Add the cabbage and the green onion. Toss well to incorporate the seasoning to the cabbage.
  5. Transfer the kimchi into an airtight container. Pour 1/2 to 1 cup of water into a mixing bowl and swirl around the collect the seasoning paste reside inside the bowl. Pour it back to the kimchi.
  6. Cover the kimchi with the lid and let it sit on a counter for 1 day and then, store in the refrigerator for 3-4 more days for better fermentation.

 

Turnip Gratin 

6 Servings

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INGREDIENTS

 

  • 4 whole Turnips
  • 3 cloves (to 4 Cloves) Garlic
  • 2 cups Gruyere Cheese
  • 4 Tablespoons (to 6 Tablespoons) Butter
  • Chicken Broth
  • Heavy Cream
  • Salt And Pepper, to taste
  • Fresh Herbs, to taste

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat the oven to 375º.

Start by peeling and thinly slicing the turnips and mincing the cloves of garlic. Grate about 2 cups of Gruyere cheese.

In a large oven-proof skillet, melt 2-3 tablespoons of butter over medium-low heat. Place a single layer of turnips on top of the butter.

Next, sprinkle a little of the garlic on top, then – and this is purely optional and really not all that necessary – add a couple of tablespoons of butter.

Next drizzle a healthy splash of chicken broth over the turnips. Next, do the same with the cream.

Now add a nice layer of Gruyere – about ½ cup. Sprinkle a bit of salt, but not much as the cheese is already salty.

Repeat these layers twice more. Sprinkle on some freshly ground black pepper.

Now pop the whole thing into the over and bake for about 20 minutes or until the top is hot, brown and bubbly.

 

butternut squash and spinach pasta casserole recipe with caramelized onions 

butternut-squash-and-spinach-pasta-casserole

Ingredients

  • 2 cups dry, high fiber pasta
  • 4 cups butternut squash, cut into small cubes
  • 3 large onions, thinly sliced
  • 16 oz fresh spinach leaves
  • 8oz fresh, whole milk mozzarella, sliced
  • 15oz container fat free ricotta
  • 2 tbsp light butter
  • 1/4 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 ½ cups fat free milk
  • 1/2 cup fresh basil, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp dried sage powder
  • 1 tsp chili flakes
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan

 

Instructions

  1. To roast the butternut squash, preheat oven to 425F. Lightly spray the butternut squash with an olive oil mister and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast the butternut squash for about 30 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, set a non-stick skillet over medium heat and heat olive oil. Then add cloves of garlic and a pinch of chili flakes.
  3. Heat until garlic begins to soften, about 2 minutes. Add in spinach and sauté until spinach is completely wilted. Set aside on a paper towel to drain.
  4. Prepare pasta according to package directions. Drain and set aside.
  5. To caramelize the onions, melt 1 tablespoon of butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the onions with a tsp of salt and cook down for about 20-30 minutes, until onions turn brown. Set aside.
  6. To make the creamy sauce, bring the milk, nutmeg, sage, ½ tsp pepper, and remaining chili flakes to a simmer.
  7. In a separate sauce pan, make the roux by melting the remaining tbsp. of butter and then adding in the flour. Stir until doughy (about one minute).
  8. Whisk the milk into the butter and flour mix (the roux). It should be smooth and velvety, not chunky or too thick. If it is, just add some more milk to thin it out. Add in the Parmesan, and whisk until smooth. Set aside.
  9. In a small bowl, combine ricotta, basil, remaining garlic, salt, pepper and chili flakes.
  10. Now, preheat the oven to 375.
  11. In a large, 5qt casserole dish, place a layer of noodles, spinach, butternut squash, onions, and then dot with a third of ricotta. Then cover with about 1/4 of the cream sauce. Repeat with the remaining ingredients until are used up.
  12. Then top evenly with the sliced mozzarella.
  13. Bake for about 20-25 minutes, or until bubbling.
  14. Turn the broiler on and bake for another 5 minutes, or until browned on top.
  15. Remove from oven and let cool for about 15-20 minutes.

 

 

 

From the (muddy) Mesa Top: Jan 19, 2017

Climatology 2017:  This week’s storm included over ½ inch of rain followed from a few inches of very heavy/wet snow.  The predictions of the NOAA meteorologist have been spot on for several weeks.  This storm came on Saturday evening with rain that lasted all night and then transitioned over to snow during the day Sunday, with wet snow Sunday night and foggy and flurries and drizzle all day Monday.  All together close to an inch of precipitation

It has been exhausting to say the least, on the cows and the people, and the wear and tear on equipment of all sorts is extreme.

The latest long range prediction calls for the weekend storm pattern to continue.

Supposedly the next round of storms will be colder and we may see more snow at 7000 feet elevation

From the Wild:  Ok well this is kind of weird, but the most amazing wild world sitings this week were flies and worms.  Seriously, flies on a Friday in mid January, the warmest day before the storm started.  Buzzing flies!  And then on Sunday when a little bit of hand shoveling was needed keep the water that was running across the land directed to the right places, worms in the shovels full of mud. These are very unexpected January sightings

 

Cow stories:  Momma cow #1 (ear tag #) had her bull calf some time during the night or early morning of the rain storm.  Sher found a fairly dry and sheltered spot, but when morning came and we spotted her calf in a fairly muddy spot and shivering.

A distraction / extraction action had to be performed to get the calf without psycho mom trampling the intervening humans.  This was successful and the little calf got to get all cleaned up and warm by the fire and then brought out to his mom and the two of them were all set up in a sheltered and warm spot with plenty of fresh straw on the ground.

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We are keeping an eye on a couple more possible calfers, coming soon

Beneficial birds:  The pullets are getting tough.  They are being hardened off prior to moving them to a pab in the big chicken house.

Less heat, even at night, unless it is very cold.

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

 

 

 

 

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of January 12th, 2017

 

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday January 12th, 2017

Carrots from Frisco Farm

Hubbard Squash from Jubilee Farm

Salad Mix from Sol y Tierra

Jarred NM Peaches, Jarred by MM Colorado

NM Potatoes from Schwebach Farm

Kale from Preferred Produce

 

What are you doing for Lunch Tomorrow?

Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen  is whipping up another delicious dish, this time using our chickens! Tomorrow’s lunch special will be Indonesian Chicken Curry, using Mesa Top free range non-gmo chickens. For anyone who hasn’t tried our chickens yet, we are really pleased with their succulent meat, so we are doubly excited to see them crafted into a dish by Chef Miguel, with creative inspiration from Fiona and Soma! Sweetwater is open till 2:30pm, the special will probably run for more than just tomorrow, but there are no guarantees when it comes to a good curry!

 

Egg-xcellent Updates

When Steve founded our family farm back in 1994, it was with the vision of raising fresh, pesticide free produce, cattle and of course our Beneficial Eggs. For over 20 years, the farm has grown and changed, but our core foundation has only been improved through the decades. Of all the different directions the farm has taken, we have really focused on certain core areas. We grow massive amounts of summer and winter squash, continue to grow our Ayrshire cattle herd for both meat and milk that goes into our cheese, and of course our eggs.

2016 may have been a disruptive year in many ways, but for us, it was when the stars aligned and we applied for and received a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture for Value Added Producers. Value Added products are where a farmer or ranchers producers a raw commodity and turns it into a product with more value. Along with us, Old Windmill Dairy and La Mesa Org (our juice partner in Dixon) also received grants to further develop their operations and products, so NM is really on a hot streak! The La Montanita Cooperative Distribution Center was able to hire a Benjamin Bartley in the spring of 2016 under a USDA grant, as their Value Chain Specialist. Ben has been a major benefit to our food community, and has worked with Steve and Thomas throughout this grant process to help navigate the challenging grant stipulations, as well as helping OWD in the same capacity.

It is only fitting that 2017 is the year of the Rooster on the Chinese Calendar, because for us, it is the year of the egg! With the support of our grant, we are hard at work taking Beneficial Eggs to the next level. We will be updating our retail cartons, to reflect more current information about our eggs, as well as marketing efforts and website upgrades. The grant also allows us to hire a representative for our product, that will greatly help us grow and maintain a presence for the Beneficial Eggs. The third major part of the grant is for equipment to upgrade our value adding capacity. This will be used for an egg washing machine, an egg grader (weigher) and salmonella testing. Right now, all our eggs are washed by hand, which only works to a certain level and our cartons of eggs are hand weighed to ensure that each dozen is the correct average egg weight. These two machines will be crucial with our growth, because it already takes a considerable about of time to perform these tasks at a smaller scale. Grading our eggs also makes sure we are following laws for selling our eggs to restaurants.

Here at the farm, we are kicking things into full throttle, as much as we can. We have 250 chickens being raised, with plans of doing 2 more 250 chick-raising rounds this year, adding to our flock of around 1000 currently. We are looking at ways to increase our chicken’s coops, to accommodate and plan for our growth, I wouldn’t be surprised if we have 3000 chickens by the 2019. We have also reignited an old partnership with vigor, with a second egg producer now being a part of the Beneficial brand. 3V Trust worked with us last year to start growing our supply chain, and as of last week, we are back in full swing. 3V is a group of farmers in San Luis Valley, at the head of our Rio Grande River watershed that raise free range chickens in keeping with the same standards our eggs are produced in. For any of our more detailed readers, we are happy to share our agreement for satellite egg producers, it is a very well thought out document covering everything from feed, animal welfare and regulations. We do not take working with another producer lightly, since we are very proud of the high quality of egg we produce from our happy chickens, so our trust in Vicente’s practices very strong. The need to incorporate additional producers for Beneficial comes down to the demand, and a single farm’s ability to raise happy free-range chickens. Without starting to try marketing our eggs, we already have a demand of over 5500 eggs every week, which far exceeds what our gals can lay, so many customers have been without our eggs. As of last week, we could get 225 dozen eggs into the La Montantia stores with our 3V partnership, and for the stores that have been out of our eggs for a month, it was like Christmas again.

All this amazing, egg-xciting work that has been going on behind the scenes was only furthered by a request to interview us! “Put An Egg On It” will be the title of the upcoming article written by Farmer Ric of Sol Harvest Farm in Edible Magazine. We were very pleasantly surprised by Edible reaching out to us because they were looking to do an article on local egg producers, and even more so to have a fellow farmer visit our farm to write the article. I won’t spoil the story, but just know that our family was borderline in tears with how great we sound on paper, we spend so much time in the day-to-day, that hearing an outside prospective really helps affirm our efforts.  I am trying to get copies of the issue to put in shares when it comes out.

At this point, I am sure you are egg-xhausted with the puns and updates, and I am running out of details to share. I wanted to share these amazing developments, that we are very grateful for and are working very hard to make the most out of. After we received the grant, Steve and I looked at our goals, and believe we can achieve in 2 years what we are supposed to do in 3, and then keep going from there. I spent 4 years of my career working in grant funded work, and there are times where grant money doesn’t do as much good as it is intended, but this grant is one I have complete confidence in it making a huge impact in the way it was intended!

 

CSA Recipes Needed:

We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

 

 

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Apples: Double Red Delicious and Rome: On the marketplace

Spaghetti Squash: On the marketplace

Butternut Squash: On the marketplace

Hubbard Squash: On the marketplace

Carrots: On the marketplace

Navel Oranges: On the marketplace

Garlic: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

 

Braised minced pork, potato and carrot 

Ingredients

  •  3 1/2 oz of pork mince
  • 6 1/3 oz of potato
  • 3 oz of carrots
  • 3 oz of onion, chopped
  • Marinade for minced pork
  • 1 1/2 tsp light soy sauce
  • 1/4 tsp soy sauce, dark
  • 1/4 tsp sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp cornflour
  • 1 dash of white pepper
  • Seasoning
  • 1 tbsp of oyster sauce
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 3 1/2 fl oz of water
  • salt
  • pepper
  • sesame oil
  1. In a small bowl, mix minced pork with light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, sugar, corn flour and pepper till well combined. Cover with cling wrap and marinade for at least half an hour.
  2. Peel and dice carrot into small cubes. Boil or steam carrot until cooked. Set aside.
  3. Peel and dice potato into small cubes. Soak potato in water for 5 minutes to prevent them from turning dark. Drain off and pat dry with kitchen paper. Heat up pan with oil over medium-high heat. Stir fry potato until cooked and lightly golden brown. Set aside.
  4. Heat up pan again with oil over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until soft. Push onion aside. Add pork and spread it out. Do not stir fry immediately. Let it cook till slightly caramelized. Flip it over and let the other side cook for a while. Reduce the heat to low and break up the pork into tiny bits. Add the potato and carrot. Stir fry until well mix.
  5. Combine oyster sauce, sugar and water in a small bowl and add to the mixture in step (4). Stir to coat all the ingredients. Cover with lid and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10-15 minutes (depending on the size of potato and carrot). Add a bit of hot water if the sauce runs dry before the potato and carrot turn tender.
  6. When the potato and carrot are almost tender, open the lid and stir until the sauce runs dry. Season to taste with sesame oil, pepper and salt. Serve well with rice and congee.

BLUE HUBBARD PIE 

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1 blue hubbard squash, baked and pureed – 15 ounces of puree will be needed for one pie

3/4 cup sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp cloves
2 eggs
1 can (12-ounce) evaporated milk

1 10″ pie crust

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cut the hubbard squash into several large chunks and arrange on jelly roll pan. Spritz with olive oil. Bake for 45 minutes or until fork easily pierces flesh. Scoop flesh from peel, and puree.

Prepare pie crust in 9″ pie pan.

Mix sugar, salt, cinnamon, ginger and cloves in a small bowl. Beat eggs in a large bowl. Stir in squash puree and spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk. Pour pie filling mixture into shell.

Bake in 425 degree oven for 15 minutes. Reduce temperature to 350 degrees; bake 40-50 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack 2 hours.

Sautéed Potatoes With Black Kale and Nigella 

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 bunch black kale (about 1/2 pound), stemmed, leaves washed in 2 changes water
  •  Salt
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 ½ pounds potatoes, such as yellow potatoes or Yukon golds, cut in small dice (about 1/2 inch)
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • 1 teaspoon nigella seeds
  •  Freshly ground pepper

 

PREPARATION

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil while you clean kale. When water comes to a boil, salt generously and add kale. Blanch 2 to 3 minutes, until just tender. Transfer to a bowl of cold water, drain and squeeze out excess water, taking it up by the handful. Cut squeezed bunches of kale into slivers and set aside.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over high heat in a heavy, preferably nonstick, 12-inch skillet and add potatoes. Turn heat down to medium-high and sear without stirring for 5 minutes, then shake and toss in pan for another 5 to 8 minutes, or until just tender and lightly browned. Add salt and continue to toss in pan for another minute or two, until tender. Add remaining teaspoon oil, shallots and nigella seeds and cook, stirring until shallots are tender and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Stir in kale and additional salt if desired and cook, stirring or tossing in the pan for another 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat, taste and adjust seasonings, and serve.

CHIPOTLE CHICKEN BLUE HUBBARD SQUASH SOUP 

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INGREDIENTS

  • 6 C of blue hubbard squash, cubed (pumpkin will also work)
  • 6 C bone broth or boxed chicken broth
  • 1 C chopped chicken
  • 1 15-oz can chopped tomatoes, drained
  • 1 15-oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1 green pepper, diced
  • 1 medium Vidalia onion
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • ½ to 1 tsp chipotle chili powder (depending on how much heat you like)
  • ½ tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp garlic
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • ½ tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped, or 2 tsp Dorot frozen cilantro

 

INSTRUCTIONS

 

  1. Peel and cube your blue hubbard squash and then set aside. If you have an especially big blue hubbard squash (they can get quite large) that is difficult to cut into, you can put it in a paper grocery bag and then smash it on the ground. Seriously, who wouldn’t have fun doing that?
  2. Dice your peppers and onions and sauté them with olive oil in the pot that you’ll be cooking your soup in. You’ll want to sauté them for approximately 3 minutes, until they start to become soft, but don’t over-cook, because they will add a nice texture to your soup.
  3. Set ½ of your peppers and onions aside in a dish and leave the other ½ in your soup pot. Next, add the cubed blue hubbard squash, the chicken broth, and salt to the pot. Bring it to a simmer on medium-high heat and then turn the heat down to medium-low, continuing to simmer until the blue hubbard squash is soft and starting to fall apart.
  4. While your soup base is simmering away, you can use this time to prep your chicken, drain your tomatoes and beans, and measure your spices out into a separate bowl.
  5. Using a hand blender, purée the contents of your soup pot until the soup base becomes smooth. If it’s too thick for your taste, you can just add additional broth or water to the mixture. If you don’t have a hand blender, I highly recommend getting one. They are super useful and much easier than trying to use a regular blender.
  6. Finally, add the remainder of the peppers and onions, the chicken, canned tomatoes, black beans, and the spices to the pot. Return to a simmer on medium heat, simmering for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, and then your soup is ready to serve!

Braised Chicken Thighs with Carrots, Potatoes and Thyme 

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Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 lb. (750 g) boneless, skinless chicken thighs, fat trimmed
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • Sweet paprika, to taste
  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • 1 lb. (500 g) red-skinned potatoes, about 2 inches (5 cm) in
    diameter, quartered
  • 8 carrots, halved lengthwise and then cut into 1 1/2-inch (4-cm)
    pieces
  • 1 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. gluten-free flour mix
  • 1 1/3 cups (11 fl. oz./330 ml) low-sodium, gluten-free chicken
    broth
  • 1/3 cup (3 fl. oz./80 ml) dry vermouth or dry white wine
  • 1 1/2 Tbs. minced fresh thyme

Directions:

Season the chicken lightly with salt and pepper and then generously with paprika. In a large, heavy fry pan over medium-high heat, warm the olive oil. Add the chicken and cook, turning once, until browned, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate.

Add the onion to the pan and stir, then add the potatoes and carrots. Season with salt and pepper and sauté until the vegetables are beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the flour mix and stir to coat. Gradually stir in the broth and vermouth and bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Return the chicken to the pan and bring to a boil.

Cover the pan, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer until the chicken and vegetables are cooked through, stirring and turning the chicken over occasionally, about 25 minutes. Stir in the thyme. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper. Divide the chicken and vegetables among 4 warmed plates and serve immediately. Serves 4.

 

Canned peach pie filling 

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Ingredients

  • 2 c. or 1 (#2 1/2) can peaches
  • 1 c. sugar
  • 2 tbsp. cornstarch
  • 1/8 tsp. nutmeg
  • 1/8 stick butter

How to make it

  • Drain juice from peaches. Mix sugar, cornstarch, and nutmeg and add to juice. Add butter and cook over low heat until mixture thickens. Line pie tin with crust. add peaches and thickened juice. Top with second crust. Bake at 450 degrees for 20 minutes or until brown.

Summer Potato Kale Gratin 

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Ingredients:

  • 1 lg bunch kale, washed, ribbed and torn or chopped roughly
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced, optional
  • 2 cloves garlic sliced or pressed
  • 2 T. olive oil
  • 1 T. butter
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 3 large potatoes peeled, sliced into  1/4″-thick rounds
  • 3 T. butter, into pats
  • 3/4 c. or more milk or cream (I’ve made it with milk and it’s still good, but the cream is better)
  • 1 c sharp white cheddar – grated (I have a hard time finding sharp white, so we substitute without a problem)

Instructions:

  • Grease a 2 qt casserole. Preheat oven to 350.
  • Saute the onion and garlic in mixture of olive oil and butter. When onion is translucent, add the kale and saute until wilted. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside. When cool, chop fine.
  • Make a bottom layer of sliced potatoes, then top with pats of butter and season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle a generous handful of grated cheese over the potatoes.
  • On top of the cheese, layer the chopped kale – use your hands and just spread it out over the potatoes. You can toss on some more shredded cheese for good measure, if you like.
  • Repeat the potato layer, with more butter, salt and pepper on top. Then finish off the cheese and pour the milk or cream over the entire gratin. It should come up to the top layer of the potatoes, although not fully submerge them. If you don’t have enough liquid, add some more (sometime I do half milk, half cream, if I’m feeling “healthy” – ha ha ha!)
  • Bake for about 1.25 hours – checking to make sure that the milk or cream is absorbed and the gratin is “firm”. If the top is getting too brown, loosely cover with foil.

 

Chickpea and Butternut Squash Curry 

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Ingredients

  • Oil-1 tbs.
  • Onion, chopped-2 medium
  • Garlic, chopped – 3-4 cloves
  • Cilantro, chopped (stalks and leaves separated, stalks reserved)- 1 bunch
  • Butternut Squash, diced- 1 medium
  • Chickpeas- 1 can
  • Patak’s Korma Paste or any other curry paste (not cooking sauce)- 2 tbsp.
  • Coconut Milk- 1 can
  • Water- 2 cups
  • Spinach- 100 gr
  • Frozen Peas- ½ cup
  • Desiccated unsweetened coconut (optional)- 2 tbsp.
  • Salt- to taste
  • Basmati Rice- 2 cups

Instructions

  1. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a large and deep pan and cook chopped onions, garlic and cilantro stalks over low heat for 10 minutes until soft and slightly coloured.
  2. Meanwhile dice your butternut squash to match the size of chickpeas. I leave the skin on as I discovered it cooks very nicely and eliminates a lot of unnecessary work. When the onions are tender add the curry paste and cook for a minute or so stirring the whole time, then add your squash, chickpeas, coconut milk, desiccated coconut, water and a pinch of salt, bring it to a boil by turning the heat up, then turn the heat down to a low-medium and simmer it covered for 35-40 minutes. Stir it occasionally to prevent from burning and add a few splashes of water if it gets too dry.
  3. Start on the rice. Cook your rice in the rice cooker according to the manufacture’s instructions.
  4. Test the butternut squash, it should be fork tender by this point but not falling apart. Your curry should be thick so if it’s too runny, uncover and let the liquid cook down for a few more minutes. When you are satisfied with the consistency of the curry stir in peas, spinach and cilantro leaves, cover with a lid and take off the heat.
  5. Serve with steaming hot basmati rice. We love having naan bread or chapattis and various Indian pickles and chutney with our curries.

 

 

 

 

From the Mesa Top: Jan 12, 2017

Climatology 2017:  This past week’s storm included a rain/slush event changing over to snow, which was followed by the coldest temperatures of the winter.

The snow measured near half a foot at Mesa Top, on top of the slushy wet base.

When the precip. melted, the measurable water was over half an inch.

From the Wild:  Flocks of ravens, flocks of mountain blue birds.  Lots of birds, hiding during the cold and then responding to the warmth with lots of activity.

They are fortunate to be able to stay free of the mud.

Cow stories:  All quiet in the herd.  Unfortunately these freeze and thaw cycles make their feeding area very mucky.  This in turn drives them, out to clean ground, away from the feeding area.  This is the best thing for them anyway.

Beneficial birds:  The pullets needed pampering during the bitter cold so they has 24 hour heating.

The story in winter is frequently a repetition.  The yoyo of weather, up and down, and how to deal with all of the creatures pushed together into cramped conditions, the effects of short cold days.

For the farmer it is a time to keep warm, avoid overdoing and overextending, take care of the take good care, and watch and wait for the days to get longer

Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

 

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