Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of September 29nd, 2016

Check out the Webstore:http://www.farmigo.com/store/beneficialfarm

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday September 29nd, 2016

Heirloom Tomatoes from Owl Peak Farm

Kale from Owl Peak Farm

Radishes from Vida Verde

Broccoli Raab from Chispas Farm

Shishito Peppers from Chispas Farm

Mizuna from Vida Verde

Poblano Peppers from Chispas Farm

Chicken and Chili!

What a weekend, the family was certainly kept busy with our projects! Mesa Top Farm started butchering our latest flock of chickens for members. Our birds have had a great summer, rotating around the fields in our mobile fenced areas, and they are now fully grown, for a delicious chicken dinner. We raise all our birds on non-GMO grain from Embudo, hormone free. Colleen and the boys spent Saturday processing the first 50 birds, with a few more weekend projects to come. Birds are on the marketplace, $3.99/lb!

Thomas spent Friday in Albuquerque, where he was roasting chili. He did 600lbs of chili, half Green Medium Chili and half fresh Red Chili Hot. We had to time things perfectly with the field to get the fresh red chili, to get it in right after it turned color fully. The chili has been cleaned on vacuum packaged over the weekend, and is still being worked on. When it’s all done, it will be something that will be in shares and the marketplace through the winters. Start planning on some savory green chili chicken soup!

 

Pristina water and Zia Soda

As most of you know, we are doing our CSA aggregation and distribution at a family’s live/work house in Oshara Village. What we haven’t really shared in detail before is that this family is also one of our local producers. Ezra and Sonia Leyba own Zia Energia along with their friends Ryan Leon and Christalyn Concha up in Taos. Zia launched their first local artisan soda, Rootbeer, in September 2015 and followed it up with their amazing Ginger Brew in July 2016!

http://www.ziaenergia.com/about-us

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Ezra also runs Pristina water, bottled here in Santa Fe.

The Ultimate Hydration Drink

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“In a crystal, we have the clear evidence of the existence of a formative life-principle,

and though we cannot understand the life of a crystal, it is nonetheless a living being!”  – Nicola Tesla

 

Check out their website for all the very technical information about what makes this water the best for your body!

http://www.drinkpristinawater.com/

We are now carrying 4 packs, Rootbeer, Ginger Brew and Mixed, Zia sodas, as well as Pristina bottled water and concentrate.

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares,which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Heirloom Tomatoes: In your share and on the Marketplace

Heirloom Cherry Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Shishito Peppers: On the Marketplace

Padron Peppers: On the Marketplace

Han Tsai Tai: On the Marketplace

Salad: On the Marketplace

 

KALE AND SAUSAGE STUFFED HEIRLOOM TOMATO

kale-and-sausage-stuffed-tomato

Ingredients

  • 1 large heirloom tomato
  • 1 shallot, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped kale leaves
  • 1 sweet Italian sausage link, chopped
  • pinch red pepper flakes
  • salt & pepper
  • goat cheese, for garnish
  • basil, for garnish

Directions

  1. Cut the top with stem off the tomato and carefully scoop out most of the insides creating a large well to be stuffed. Reserve the tomato “guts” in a small bowl and set aside.
  2. In a skillet over medium heat, add the olive oil and shallot. Sauté for 3 minutes until golden.
  3. Add chopped sausage and cook for 3-5 minutes.
  4. Add kale, red pepper flakes and salt & pepper to taste.
  5. Sauté until kale is wilted.
  6. Transfer kale and sausage mixture to a bowl.
  7. Add 2-3 tablespoons of tomato guts and stir to combine.
  8. Spoon kale and sausage mixture into the tomato and top with goat cheese and sliced basil.

 

Radish and Broccoli Rabe Pasta

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Serves about 4.

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: About 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 12 ounces’ ziti noodles
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1-pound broccoli rabe, chopped
  • 4 ounces’ prosciutto
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 4 teaspoons pine nuts
  • About 4 fresh radishes, sliced
  • Salt and pepper

Directions:

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a rapid boil. Add pasta and a dash of salt. Cook until al dente about 8-10 minutes. Rinse in cold water and set aside.
  2. In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Add the onion and garlic; cook about 3 – 4 minutes. Add in chopped broccoli rabe. Cook on medium heat until broccoli rabe is wilted and softened, about 6-8 minutes. Add salt and pepper.
  3. Carefully chop the proscuitto. Toss the broccoli rabe with the pasta and mix with tongs. Add Parmesan cheese, proscuitto and additional salt and pepper.  Slice the turnips into thin slices.
  4. Serve pasta with a dash of pine nuts and thinly sliced turnips

 

Shishito Peppers in Soy Ginger Sauce

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Ingredients

  • 1 lb shishito peppers
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 lime (juiced)
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger (zested)
  • 1/4 cup panko breadcrumbs (optional topping)

Sauté the shishito peppers over medium heat for 2-3 minutes.

Next, whisk the other ingredients together in a small bowl.

Pour the sauce over the shishito peppers.

Cook over medium heat for 10-15 minutes or until the peppers are tender and the sauce begins to thicken into a glaze.

Toast the breadcrumbs in a skillet over medium-high heat for 5 minutes.

Sprinkle the breadcrumbs on top of the shishito peppers and serve!

 

Pasta with Mizuna, Sundried Tomatoes and Walnuts

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1 lb. pasta
2 Tbsp. olive oil
Several cloves garlic, very finely chopped, about 1/8 c.
1/2 c. walnuts, chopped
1/3 c. sundried tomatoes, chopped
1 bunch mizuna, roughly chopped
1 tsp. Worchestershire sauce
Salt and pepper, to taste
Parmesan, grated

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Add pasta and cook until al dente. Drain.

While pasta is cooking, heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add olive oil and heat till it shimmers. Add garlic and sauté briefly until it warms, then add walnuts, sundried tomatoes and mizuna. Sauté until mizuna wilts and add Worchestershire sauce and salt to taste. Remove from heat if pasta isn’t done. When pasta is drained, place in serving bowl and top with mizuna mixture, tossing to combine. Serve with parmesan for sprinkling.

 

Vegetarian Stuffed Poblano Peppers:

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What it took for 2, with a WHOLE lot of filling leftover, boom:

* 2 poblano peppers, sliced lengthwise (seeds discarded)
* 1 cup uncooked brown rice
* 1 (14.5 can) black beans, drained and rinsed
* 1 cup frozen or canned corn
* 1 cup fresh salsa
* 1 Tbs. cumin
* 1 Tbs. chili powder
* 2 scallions, finely chopped
* 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
* cilantro sprigs for garnish
* 1 lime
* pinch of salt and pepper

Cook the rice in a rice cooker or on the stove, your choice!

Set oven to broil. Place the peppers skin side down on a rimmed baking sheet and broil 5 minutes, to start the softening. Remove from heat. Adjust oven to 400.

In a large (microwave safe) bowl combine the cooked rice, black beans, salsa, corn, scallions, cumin, chili powder, and a good pinch of salt and pepper. Toss to combine. Cook in microwave for 1 minute.

Spoon the filling into each pepper half, as much as you can get in there.

Sprinkle the cheese over each pepper. Slice back into the oven and bake for 20 minutes. If the cheese isn’t as bubbly as you like, flip it back to broil for 2 more minutes.

Serve garnished with cilantro and a good squeeze of lime juice!

 

From the Mesa Top: September 29, 2016

Mesa Top Puppies!

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We have 8 of the most adorable, playful, intelligent little pups you’ll ever meet! Sire is a Golden Retriever from Serbian champion bloodlines, big blocky head, weighs 90 lbs. Dam is blue (color) Standard Poodle, also from excellent linage. Farm raised (meaning on a working farm with cows, horses, chickens, etc.), well socialized (including with children) these guys/gals will be well suited for companionship or as a service dog. Health and happiness guaranteed. First shots included. $600 firm. Ready 9/24 Call 505 470 9686. Ask for Colleen.

 

Climatology 2016:  The mid-week tropical influenced storm last week brought several waves of very strong rains with a little bit of hail mixed in.  The storms were as strong as any we have seen this year.  But the waves were not very long, so the water soaked in and then the rain came again.  Often enough after the September storms there is a dry spell until early winter.  We have had a good spell of moisture for August and September after positively desolate June and July, so it is probably time for the pendulum to swing the other direction

After the storm passed, we have returned to the fullness of fall:  there are some breezes but mostly very clear blue skies and brilliant starry nights.  Storms are not gathering much strength.  They are just sliding by to the north or the south.

From the Wild:  Ducks on the pond again!  It is time to keep an eye out for migrating cranes and herons.  The NRCS has come through and made an agreement to pay some of the cost of a fence down very close to the shore line so that the cows are kept out of the mud, and the pond itself is protected for wildlife access only.  Hopefully we can build that fence before the onset of winter.

Next spring, we will hope to begin supplemental pumping so that we can keep enough water in the pond to encourage the shore and water birds.

We are also looking into a turkey program, to reintroduce the native Meriam Turkey that is indigenous to the mesa.

The ravens are loudly proclaiming their pleasure with the enormous bounty of pinon.  This is a rare event for the Mesa:  strong pinon crop two years in a row.  This year’s is exceptional.

Cow stories:  Cows are moving over to our next pasture, which has been rested for the entire rainy season and has very strong grass.  We are moving them over from Herrera ranch whenever we see them near an accessible fence. They are enjoying the deep grass and laying around in the shade a lot.

Beneficial birds   The first meat birds have been harvested and are frozen and bagged.  With a little luck fresh/frozen chickens will be on the marketplace next week.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of September 22nd, 2016

Check out the Webstore:

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for

Thursday September 22nd, 2016

Ortiz Mountain Jonathan Apples from Synergia Ranch

Org Plums from Colorado

Mustard Greens from Vida Verde

Hakurei Turnips from Jubilee Farm

Purple Viking Potatoes from Owl Peak Farm

Green Tomatoes from Owl Peak Farm

 

Pristina water and Zia Soda

As most of you know, we are doing our CSA aggregation and distribution at a family’s live/work house in Oshara Village. What we haven’t really shared in detail before is that this family is also one of our local producers. Ezra and Sonia Leyba own Zia Energia along with their friends Ryan Leon and Christalyn Concha up in Taos. Zia launched their first local artisan soda, Rootbeer, in September 2015 and followed it up with their amazing Ginger Brew in July 2016!

http://www.ziaenergia.com/about-us

f556c1ff-afc1-461e-af35-8e3e14b456b3_zpss6rr1lby

Ezra also runs Pristina water, bottled here in Santa Fe.

The Ultimate Hydration Drink

received_10153733435181143_zpswbwz9fn8

“In a crystal, we have the clear evidence of the existence of a formative life-principle,

and though we cannot understand the life of a crystal, it is nonetheless a living being!”  – Nicola Tesla

 

Check out their website for all the very technical information about what makes this water the best for your body!

http://www.drinkpristinawater.com/

We are now carrying 4 packs, Rootbeer, Ginger Brew and Mixed, Zia sodas, as well as Pristina bottled water and concentrate.

 

Chile Time!

You have been smelling those roasters going for over a month now, and with Wine and Chile coming up, you know it’s time for us to get going on our chile roasting! As we move into Autumn, and start changing our crop selections, we are also planning for the Winter. We will be roasting, cleaning and packaging both green and fresh red chile for shares during our slower time of the year. We try to put a lot of planning in to prepare for our CSA during the winter, our farms store root vegetables, winter squash and cured produce for us. We also plan on value added ways we can utilize our crops, and have them in shares later in the year. Freezing chile, working with our juicer to press fruit for us, and ensuring we have a strong connection to our local greenhouse growers, to make sure we have fresh produce year-round.

 

Nocco Pasta:

Luckily, I worked with this local producer before today, but because of the holiday I don’t have the full into finished.

This week, we are introducing another of our amazing locally produced products, fresh pasta! Nocco is an artisan pasta company based in ABQ, hand making fresh pastas from Organic ingredients, in keeping with the recipes past down her Southern Italian grandmother. Alanna Casale hand makes each batch of pasta, and is working on a variety of seasonal flavor.

We are going to start out offering Original Linguine and Green Chili Fettucine, the best year-round flavors! Pasta is frozen immediately after being made, to allow you to defrost and use within a week for the best quality.

More information and flavors to come!

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares,which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Deals on case of Pears and Peaches, $15/case

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Heirloom Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Shishito Peppers: On the Marketplace

 

Mustard Greens, Tofu, and Chicken Soup Recipe (Canh Cai Dau Hu)

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Serves 4 to 6 with 2 or 3 other dishes

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon neutral-flavored oil
  • 1/2 yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 to 3 ounces’ boneless chicken thigh, cut into thumbnail-size pieces
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 5 cups water
  • 4 or 5 ounces medium-firm or firm tofu, cut into 1/2-inch (1.25 cm) cubes
  • 3 firmly packed cups (.75 L) bite-size pieces of mustard greens
  • White pepper

Instructions

  1. In a 3 to 4-quart saucepan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until fragrant and soft, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the chicken, salt, and fish sauce. Cook for a minute to let the flavors penetrate. Add the water and bring to a boil. Skim and discard any scum that floats to the top.
  2. Add the tofu and bring to a simmer; if you’re not serving right away, turn off the heat and cover, returning the pot to a simmer before moving on. Add the mustard greens. Simmer for 5 to 7 minutes, until the mustard greens have softened and turned jade green;
  3. Taste and adjust the flavors with additional salt, if necessary. Ladle into a serving bowl and garnish with the white pepper. Serve immediately.

 

Roasted Plum Tarts

roasted-plum-tarts-hero

  • 6 ready-made sweet short crust pastry cases (or make your own from frozen short crust pastry sheets)
  • 9 fresh plums, halved and stones removed
  • 2 tbsp. honey
  • ¼ cup water

Creamy Yoghurt Filling:

  • 6 tbsp. Greek yoghurt
  • 3 tbsp. sour cream
  • 1 tbsp. honey

Pre-heat oven to 250ºC. Place plums cut-side up in a shallow baking tray. Drizzle with honey and water and bake until plums are slightly browned and juices have caramelized. If using canned plums, drain 1 cup of the juices into a pot, add honey and simmer until reduced to a thick syrup. Cool.

To make Creamy Yoghurt Filling, combine Greek yoghurt with sour cream and honey.

Just before serving, spoon filling into pastry shells, top each with 3 plum halves and drizzle with caramelized plum syrup.

 

Grilled Green Tomatoes Caprese (For those of us still working on Basil from last week)

grilled-green-tomatoes-sl-x

Ingredients

1/2 cup olive oil

1/4 cup white balsamic vinegar

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1/8 teaspoon salt

4 medium-size green tomatoes, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices (about 2 lb.)

1 (16-oz.) package sliced fresh mozzarella cheese

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

1/3 cup thinly sliced fresh basil

Preparation

  1. Combine first 5 ingredients in a large zip-top plastic freezer bag; add tomatoes, seal, and shake gently to coat. Chill 1 hour.
  2. Preheat grill to 350° to 400° (medium-high) heat. Remove tomatoes from marinade, reserving marinade. Grill tomatoes, covered with grill lid, 3 to 4 minutes on each side or until tender and grill marks appear.
  3. Arrange alternating slices of warm grilled tomatoes and mozzarella cheese on a large, shallow platter. Drizzle with reserved marinade; season with salt and pepper to taste. Sprinkle with basil.

 

HONEY GLAZED BABY HAKUREI TURNIPS WITH APPLES

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INGREDIENTS

  • 2 bunches baby hakurei turnips, trimmed, greens reserved
  • 3 apples, peels left on, cored & sliced into chunks about the size of the baby turnips
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • ½ teaspoon Kosher salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Place turnips and apple chunks in a large skillet; add water to cover turnips and apples halfway.
  2. Add olive oil, honey, and salt; bring to a boil.
  3. Cook 3-4 minutes until apples are soft – remove apples.
  4. Continue cooking baby turnips until liquid is syrupy and turnips are tender, about 10 minutes.
  5. Add apples back to the skillet. Toss apples and turnips in the syrupy liquid.
  6. Add turnip greens to skillet and cook over medium heat until just wilted, about 2 minutes.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: September 22, 2016

Mesa Top Puppies!

img_3402_zpswv0vsa6qimg_3400_zps5qetcvg1

We have 8 of the most adorable, playful, intelligent little pups you’ll ever meet! Sire is a Golden Retriever from Serbian champion bloodlines, big blocky head, weighs 90 lbs. Dam is blue (color) Standard Poodle, also from excellent linage. Farm raised (meaning on a working farm with cows, horses, chickens, etc.), well socialized (including with children) these guys/gals will be well suited for companionship or as a service dog. Health and happiness guaranteed. First shots included. $600 firm. Ready 9/24 Call 505 470 9686. Ask for Colleen.

 

Climatology 2016:  The fall blow drier turned on over central and western New Mexico last week.  We experienced moderate wind, very low humilities and clear skies from sun up to sun down.  With low humilities come plummeting nighttime temperatures.

And along came the harvest moon and with it the first frost to the Mesa and so it was this week. Saturday night jack frost visited the garden and the summer squash are done now.

The leaves of the squash plants are brown and shriveled, and the winter squash are all laid open to the sun and cool air.  Over the next couple of weeks, they should cure nicely and then we will harvest and cure them further in the warmth of the greenhouse.

Meanwhile in the eastern part of the state, extreme weather with floods and hail storms and even funnel clouds were occurring, at “the dry line”, where the dry air of the central and west met the cool and moist air that moves up from the Gulf of Mexico.

Now the weather models have identified the next tropical storm from the pacific and plotted its course in a wide arc from south of the Baja, north and then east across the four corners area.  We are watching for deep moisture working across the state from west to east by mid-week.

From the Wild:  Cold nights also set the pinon cones a popping and the ground is littered with fresh and tasty nuts.  Ravens gather around the most productive trees and clean

Around the ponds tiny spadefoot toads are hopping along looking for their first winter lodging, which will be mud or damp soil that they can burrow into for protection from winter freeze.

The remaining warm days will probably provide the snake population with their last chance to head for winter cover deep in the rocks and crevices of the sandstone canyons and cliffs.

The coyotes have been singing.  The harvest moon brings out the coyote symphony.

Cow stories:  The cows are starting to spread out again in search of the remaining green grasses are much diminished.  The gramma and warm season grasses are done growing now, with long brown stems and seeds on tops. Even when dry, the warm season grasses are relatively protein rich and the cows can continue to keep fattening as their coats also thicken and they get ready for winter. The cool season grasses are still green and tender, but they are not as widespread.

At last we are near ready to move the herd all the way north, across the national forest, and onto the Holians’ Glorieta freedom ranch where deep grass await them.  We are aiming for 6 weeks on there.  We may have to keep some of the cows’ home who are getting ready to calf, as we do have a fair number of fall calves.

Beneficial birds   The first meat birds will be harvested this weekend.  With a little luck fresh/frozen chickens will be on the marketplace next week.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of September 15th, 2016

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday September 15th, 2016

Chard from Owl Peak Farm

Basil from Chispas Farm

Hon Tsai Tai from Chispas Farm

Plums from Tesuque Pueblo

Pears from Synergia Ranch

Leeks from Jubilee Farm

Salad Mix from Mesa Top Farm

Cucumbers from Mesa Top Farm

 

Nocco Pasta:

Luckily, I worked with this local producer before today, but because of the holiday I don’t have the full into finished.

This week, we are introducing another of our amazing locally produced products, fresh pasta! Nocco is an artisan pasta company based in ABQ, hand making fresh pastas from Organic ingredients, in keeping with the recipes past down her Southern Italian grandmother. Alanna Casale hand makes each batch of pasta, and is working on a variety of seasonal flavor.

We are going to start out offering Original Linguine and Green Chili Fettucine, the best year-round flavors! Pasta is frozen immediately after being made, to allow you to defrost and use within a week for the best quality.

More information and flavors to come!

 

Oh, Ghee!

We had a member ask us to look into carrying ghee, specifically the Ancient Organic’s one. After helping us find out more info on it, and convincing us of what an awesome product it is, we decided to give it a try. We had a case shipped in CA, and it sounds like only 2 other places in Santa Fe carry it, and we offer it at a lower price!

What the heck is ghee?

Ghee is a premium cooking oil celebrated for its wonderful taste, nutritional benefits, and medicinal qualities. In India, Ghee has always been a sacred and cherished symbol of auspiciousness, nourishment and healing, especially in the daily rituals of cooking and worship. Ayurveda, the ancient medial science of India, recognizes Ghee as an essential part of a balance diet., and is considers it to be the best fat one can eat. Ghee is the very essence of butter, the end result of a long, slow, careful clarification process that removes all the moisture, milk solids, and impurities. The absence of milk solids and water in ghee make it completely shelf stable and easily digested. Ghee has one of the highest flash points (485 degrees F) of any cooking oil, preventing the creation of free radicals and oxidized molecules common in high temperature cooking.

If anyone would like a flyer on health benefits and used of ghee, and what makes Ancient Organics so unique, we can it in your shares, just ask. Hopefully this is something many of our members really enjoy, and we will continue to carry!

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Chard: In your share and on the marketplace

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Kale: Dino, and Curly: on the marketplace

Cucumber, Armenian, marketmore, and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Patty Pan & Zucchini: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Tomatillos: On the Marketplace

Heirloom Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Green Beans: On the Marketplace

Eggplant: On the Marketplace

Shishito Peppers: On the Marketplace

Broccoli Raab: On the Marketplace

Peaches, NM: On the Marketplace

Habeneros: On the Marketplace

 

Hon Tsai Tai Stir Fry

Ingredients:
1 cup dry quinoa
2 cups water
3 tablespoons sesame oil
1 pound extra firm tofu, cut into small cubes
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 onion, chopped
5 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 ounce chopped crystallized ginger
2 carrots, sliced
2 teaspoon fish sauce
4 tablespoons gluten-free tamari sauce
4 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
3.5 ounces shitake mushrooms, stems removed and sliced
8 oz (about 4 cups chopped) Hon Tsai Tai stems separated from the leaves and flowers- if you can’t find this green at your local grocer or farmer’s market, substitute any leafy green of your choosing.

In a small saucepan place quinoa and the 2 cups of water. Cover and turn to medium. When the lid starts to rattle, turn the heat to low and let simmer for 10-15 minutes, or until all the liquid is absorbed. Keep lid on and pull from heat so the pan doesn’t burn.

Meanwhile, in a large wok or large saucepan add sesame oil and heat over medium.  Add the tofu and red pepper flakes and sauté until the sides are golden brown and crisp, 8-10 minutes.  Add the onion and garlic and stir until translucent, about 2-3 minutes.

Add sliced carrots  and Hon Tsai Tai stems and stir another 2-3 minutes. Add crystalized ginger, fish sauce, rice wine vinegar and tamari sauce, stir another 2 minutes. While carrots are still crunchy add mushrooms. Continue stirring until carrots are soft and mushrooms have thoroughly cooked, about 2-3 minutes more. Just prior to serving add the Hon Tsai Tai leaves and flowers, or greens of your choice.  Immediately pull from heat and continue mixing the greens into the stir-fry. The heat from the other ingredients will wilt the greens.  Serve over quinoa.

 

Lemon, Leek, and Basil Sauce (for seafood, chicken, or pasta)

Sauce

  • 1/2cup butter
  • 4medium leeks -halved and thinly sliced (only the white and pale green parts)
  • 2lemons – juiced
  • 2cups cream
  • 1/2cup fresh basil – chopped
  1. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in heavy large saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Add leeks; cover and cook until leeks are very tender, stirring occasionally (10-15 minutes).
  3. Add lemon juice and stir for a minute.
  4. Add cream and simmer until thick enough to coat the back of a spoon (about 10 minutes).
  5. Salt and pepper to taste. Stir in basil just before serving.

Shrimp, Lemon, Leek, and Basil Pasta

  • 16ounces pasta of your choice
  • Lemon, Leek, and Basil sauce, prepared as above
  • 20-30shrimp
  • 1tablespoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 4-6bamboo skewers, soaked in water
  • 1/2cup peas
  • 4-6pieces of bacon, cooked and crumbled
  1. Preheat grill to 400 degrees. Begin heating salted water for pasta.
  2. Place 5 shrimp on each skewer and season with lemon pepper seasoning and salt and pepper as desired.
  3. Prepare sauce as listed above. When it reaches the cream stage, add pasta to water and cook until al dente.
  4. Also while sauce is thickening, boil peas in a small pot until cooked through. Drain and set aside.
  5. Grill shrimp skewers for 3 minutes per side.
  6. Toss pasta and peas with sauce. Top with shrimp and garnish with crumbled bacon.

Pear Salad with Raspberry Cream

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Ingredients

3/4 cup sour cream

1/4 cup raspberry preserves

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar

1/8 teaspoon Dijon mustard

4 firm, ripe pears

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 head Bibb lettuce, torn

1 small head romaine lettuce, torn

1/2 cup freshly shredded Parmesan cheese

6 bacon slices, cooked and crumbled

1/2 cup fresh raspberries

Preparation

Whisk together first 4 ingredients. Set dressing aside.

Peel pears, if desired; quarter pears. Brush with lemon juice.

Arrange lettuce on 4 plates. Arrange pear quarters over lettuce. Drizzle with dressing; sprinkle with cheese, bacon, and raspberries.

 

 

 

From the Mesa Top: September 15, 2016

Climatology 2016:  Last week was a bit of a drier week than the rest of August.  This the first full week of September brings the possibility of tropical storm moisture working its way north.  The Southern and eastern part of the state are marked as bullseye for several inches of rain during the days ahead.

It would not take much of a wobble in the storm track for the northern part of the state to be deluged as well.  Or for that matter, for the storm to miss the state completely.

Meanwhile the grasses on the Mesa are heading up and seeding.  Pastures that were at rest through the entire season have grass almost knee high.  Even pastures that were grazed in the spring, or received light grazing in the summer, are heading up and seeding at ankle height.

Mushrooms are appearing, not just in the old cow pies, but is some cases in the pine and juniper needles under the trees.  Most appear on shady north sides where the ground stays damp on the surface, even when the sun shines.

The tropical moisture surge means higher humilities and warmer nights.  Another round of rains would mean another round of pasture growth.  The native grassed of our semi-arid ecosystem are adapted to quick response.

In the cow’s hoof prints rain water collects and concentrates and is absorbed slowly into the soil.  In these spots baby grasses are growing.  More rain now could also give us the first areas in years where the pasture grasses regenerate.

From the Wild:  More rattlesnakes on the move.  Several have shown up around buildings which is not good.  In particular they are approaching wood and lumber piles, and animal feed areas, where there are plenty of fine tasting rodents, well fed on organic and local grain.

One of these beauties was by far the largest snake ever to be noticed around Mesa Top.  7 foot or so, with a body several inches in diameter, and some very vivid black stripes at the tail and a resounding rattle.  Maggie the snake dog (once bitten, now very careful) set up a mad bark-a-thon, alertly watching the king of snakes slowly heading toward a lumber pile. Steve headed it off and caught it, lifting it up with a long stick and dropping it into a big barrel, which was then loaded onto a truck and driven several miles away to a new, rocky shelfed home.

Cow stories:  The cows continue to enjoy the easy life.  Plenty of grass and plenty of water.  They are scattered across several hundred acres of pasture.  They seem to be completely unworried and placated.

Beneficial birds   The meat birds are opened out onto the next ring of pasture.  They are growing quickly and the largest should be ready to process around 4 weeks from now.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

 

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of September 8th, 2016

 

Check out the Webstore: http://www.farmigo.com/store/beneficialfarm

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday September 8th, 2016

Collards from Synergia Ranch

Padron Peppers from Chispas Farm

Broccoli Raab from Chispas Farm

Org Nectarines from Southern CO

Fingerling Potatoes from Owl Peak Farm

Mexican Grey Squash from Sol y Tierra

(In Discussion) Either Apples or Pears from Synergia Ranch

Labor Day Fun!

We took full advantage of it being a holiday, to catch up with some of our northern partners. We always misunderstand Labor Day, I mean Labor is in the name, doesn’t that mean we work extra hard, J?

We were able to use the time off to travel up to Dixon, to meet with our Apple Stewards, spending some much needed time checking on crops, sharing ideas, and coming up with plans for this fall’s harvests. We spent a lot of time talking with Mesa Ruiz, who is a SF Farmer’s Market regular this time of year, and our juicing partner. Our CSA members should be quite familiar with the wonderful raw ciders Mesa has juiced for us over the years, and to our newest members, just you wait! This season, we are discussing working even more directly with Mesa, as he is looking to expand his cider production.

Right now, Mesa juices over 1,200lbs of apples a week, blending Org Local apple varieties in each batch, to produce 90 gallons of mind blowing raw cider. This year has been very favorable to the orchards, with a bumper crop of apples on the trees! Mesa is ready to expand, since that 90 gallons only covers the Santa Fe and Eldorado markets; and there are as many bushels of apples still to be juiced, as there are families that would love to have this wonderful cider in their lives. We may bore you with more knowledge about the apple cider juicing process at some point, but pay no attention to the men behind the curtain, the goal is to help our fellow farmer and producer reach 2-3X his current market! This year’s crop is the one to support larger growth, and we are working to support this happening.

Later that day, we took a few steps backwards, to visit the apples still on the trees. We visited Rick M’s family orchard in Chamita, NM. This is part of a different project, a whole harvest program that works with local food banks and retailers. To spare you the step by step, long page I could write, this program allows the orchard to grow and harvest apples, and then coordination between local partners helps in the separation of apples that work for everyone’s needs, lessening the burden of each orchard to handle it all themselves. As I looked at these trees burdened with fruit, I see apples that are perfect for the show case, apples that you can do a great 3lb bargain bag, apples that can be donated to food banks and apples that with a little knife work, can be pressed! My head swims with how much time that takes our farmer just to balance it out, and at the end of the season, have paid his bills (and this is just one orchard)!

By the end of today, we couldn’t tell a Gala from a Macintosh, overload of taste buds, but it was definitely a day well spend with our farmers!

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Nocco Pasta:

Luckily, I worked with this local producer before today, but because of the holiday I don’t have the full into finished.

This week, we are introducing another of our amazing locally produced products, fresh pasta! Nocco is an artisan pasta company based in ABQ, hand making fresh pastas from Organic ingredients, in keeping with the recipes past down her Southern Italian grandmother. Alanna Casale hand makes each batch of pasta, and is working on a variety of seasonal flavor.

We are going to start out offering Original Linguine and Green Chili Fettucine, the best year-round flavors! Pasta is frozen immediately after being made, to allow you to defrost and use within a week for the best quality.

More information and flavors to come!

 Nocco cutting

Nocco package.jpg

Peach Case Deal:

Jam them, freeze them, or just dig in and eat them! A study found that people eat an average of 10 peaches a year, so now is the time to munch away. We have 3 cases this week, 18/20lbs for $15 ea. We will get a few more for next week as well. Our family got 40lbs, and we are working on blanching and freezing what the rest of the family doesn’t eat.

We are also juicing 800lbs as well, which will be available later this year, possibly mixed with our fresh pressed Cider from Dixon we are working on!

Oh, Ghee!

We had a member ask us to look into carrying ghee, specifically the Ancient Organic’s one. After helping us find out more info on it, and convincing us of what an awesome product it is, we decided to give it a try. We had a case shipped in CA, and it sounds like only 2 other places in Santa Fe carry it, and we offer it at a lower price!

What the heck is ghee?

Ghee is a premium cooking oil celebrated for its wonderful taste, nutritional benefits, and medicinal qualities. In India, Ghee has always been a sacred and cherished symbol of auspiciousness, nourishment and healing, especially in the daily rituals of cooking and worship. Ayurveda, the ancient medial science of India, recognizes Ghee as an essential part of a balance diet., and is considers it to be the best fat one can eat. Ghee is the very essence of butter, the end result of a long, slow, careful clarification process that removes all the moisture, milk solids, and impurities. The absence of milk solids and water in ghee make it completely shelf stable and easily digested. Ghee has one of the highest flash points (485 degrees F) of any cooking oil, preventing the creation of free radicals and oxidized molecules common in high temperature cooking.

If anyone would like a flyer on health benefits and used of ghee, and what makes Ancient Organics so unique, we can it in your shares, just ask. Hopefully this is something many of our members really enjoy, and we will continue to carry!

Corn!

All this rain has done wonders for the Schwebach Family’s crops, a little too much in fact. The corn is maturing at a much quicker rate then they expected, as are the other crops, creating a bit of pressure to wrap up the corn and be prepared to harvest their next crop. They are bringing in a ton of corn this week, and we are having some amazing deals to pass along to members. You will have 5 ears of corn in your share this week, but we also have some marketplace specials, 12 ears for just $6! This is our big push on corn, there might be a lingering bit in the future weeks, but this week is the big harvest week!

 

Seafood

We are working on expanding our direct Alaskan seafood connection this year, hopefully to the benefit of our members. We hope to have some prawns, crabs and scallops in the future, and hopefully some additional fish varieties!

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Chard: on the marketplace

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Kale: Dino, and Curly: on the marketplace

Cucumber, Armenian, marketmore, and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Patty Pan & Zucchini: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Padron Pepper: On the marketplace

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Tomatillos: On the Marketplace

Green Bell Peppers: On the Marketplace

Corn: Specials on the marketplace

 

Roasted Garlic Fingerling Potatoes

ny0407-1_roasted-fingerling-potatoes_s4x3-jpg-rend-sni12col-landscape

Ingredients

1 1/2 pounds fingerling potatoes
4 tablespoons olive oil
8 garlic cloves, sliced
1 tablespoon freshly chopped Italian parsley leaves
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
In a casserole dish, mix together the potatoes, oil, garlic, parsley, salt, and pepper. Roast for 20 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.

SHRIMP TACOS WRAPPED IN COLLARDS

assembled-3

Ingredients

For the Salsa

  • 1 Ear of corn, kernels cut off (leave it raw)
  • 2 Smallish nectarines, or one large, sweet smelling but not too ripe to dice into corn kernel size.
  • 1 Jalapeno, seeded, de-ribbed, cut into 1/4″ strips and then 1/4″ dice.
  • 1 Shallot, medium sized, diced the same size as the jalapeno.
  • 1/4 cup Cilantro, minced.
  • 1 Lime, juiced.
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt.
  • 2 tablespoons Olive oil.

For the Shrimp:

  • 12 Wild shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 2 teaspoons Ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons Garlic powder
  • 3 Garlic cloves, minced.
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons Salt
  • 3 tablespoons Olive oil

For the Vegetables & Toppings:

  • 2 Small bell peppers, sliced in half, seeded, and sliced into 1/2″ strips.
  • 1 Onion, medium-sized, sliced into 1/2″ strips.
  • 6 Whole collard greens leaves, as round and big as you can find.
  • 1 Avocado, halved, pitted and sliced.
  • 1/2 cup Sour cream.

Instructions

  1. For the salsa, combine the corn, nectarine, onion, jalapeno, cilantro, lime, salt, and oil. The longer this sits *unrefrigerated*, the more the flavors will meld together, so feel free to make that up to 4hrs ahead of time, 1 day ahead if you are refrigerating it, but leave it out for at least 2 hours before serving.
  2. Peel and devein the shrimp if they aren’t already and combine in a bowl with cumin, garlic powder, minced garlic, salt and olive oil. Stir it all to coat the shrimp and set aside to marinade while you do the rest of the prep.
  3. Heat up a grill or cast iron stovetop griddle on medium high while you slice up the onion and bell peppers, tossing them in just enough oil to coat.
  4. Dump the vegetables onto the griddle once it’s preheated and cook them as much as you like, but enough to at least get some char on them, about 7-10 minutes.
  5. As the vegetables are cooking, peel and slice the avocado, and trim the stems of the collard greens.
  6. Remove the vegetables and add the shrimp to the griddle. Shrimp cook (and overcook) very quickly, and their texture gets rubbery if you leave them for too long. The shrimp I bought are jumbo, so I’m cooking them about 2 minutes on each side. If yours are smaller, reduce that time, but as soon as you see the spine of them go pink, pull them!
  7. For the assembly, don’t try to wrap these like a regular taco or you’ll end up with a hot mess and be like “Clark, that was some horseshit”. INSTEAD do this: Position the leaf with the stem pointing towards you. Pile what you want in your taco into the upper middle of the collard green (closer to the stem/you). Take the sides of the leaf and fold them inwards, then take the top of the leaf and fold it towards you. Essentially you’re making a taco pocket or envelope. Enjoy with a tequila cocktail!

Linguine with Broccoli Rabe-Walnut Pesto

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons walnuts
  • 1/2 pound broccoli rabe, trimmed
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Pinch of crushed red pepper
  • 1/3 cup grated pecorino cheese, plus more for serving
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 3/4 pound linguine

HOW TO MAKE THIS RECIPE

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°. Spread the walnuts in a pie plate and toast for 8 minutes, until fragrant and lightly golden; let cool. Chop 2 tablespoons of the walnuts.
  2. In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the broccoli rabe until tender, about 3 minutes. Drain and let cool under cold water. Squeeze out the excess water and coarsely chop the broccoli rabe.
  3. In a food processor, mince the garlic. Add the 1/3 cup of walnuts; pulse until coarsely chopped. Add the broccoli rabe, olive oil and crushed red pepper and process until the broccoli rabe is very finely chopped. Add the 1/3 cup of pecorino and pulse until just combined. Season with salt and pepper. Scrape the pesto into a large bowl.
  4. In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the linguine until al dente. Drain, reserving 3/4 cup of the pasta cooking water. Add the linguine to the pesto sauce, then stir in the reserved cooking water and toss until the pasta is well coated with the pesto sauce. Sprinkle with the chopped walnuts and serve at once, passing more pecorino at the table.

Stuffed Fried Padrón Peppers

padronopenplate

1/2 lb. (about 12) Padrón peppers, cut with “windows”
2 oz. of Mahon* cheese, cut into ¼” x 1” pieces
2 tablespoons olive oil
Sea salt

Pick through the peppers removing any that have wrinkled skins or dark greenish-black blemishes. Carefully wash and dry Padrón peppers, trimming stems that are longer than 1 inch. Using a sharp paring knife, “open a window” in each pepper and stuff each with a rectangle of cheese. Don’t worry about removing the seeds, they add to the flavor experience.

padronopen
Once the peppers are stuffed, heat a skillet or heavy pan over high heat and add olive oil. Heat oil to its smoking point, and then gently slide stuffed peppers into the hot oil. Cook over high heat until all sides are nicely charred and brown.

padronpan

Drain briefly on a paper towel and place on serving plate. Sprinkle generously with salt.

padrondone

This was one of the local specials this last week at State Capital Kitchen, we thank Chef Mark for the inspiration!

*If you cannot find Tetilla or Mahon cheeses, a mild white cheese such as Manchego or Monterey Jack makes for a reasonable substitute.

 

Grilled Bread Salad with Broccoli Rabe and Summer Squash

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Serves 4

For the mayonnaise marinade

  • 1cup full-fat mayonnaise
  • 1/2cup olive oil
  • 2lemons, juiced and zested (about 1/4 cup lemon juice)
  • 2garlic cloves, mashed into a paste
  • 1tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1teaspoon Aleppo pepper (or 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes)
  • 1teaspoon Spanish smoked paprika
  • 1tablespoon cumin seed

For the grilled vegetables and bread salad

  • 2 or 3mixed summer squash (about 1 1/2 pounds), cut into 1/2 inch-thick rounds
  • 1large bunch broccoli rabe (or young, tender broccoli)
  • Four1/2-inch slices from the center of a loaf of crusty bread (ciabatta or sourdough works well)
  • 1/4cup extra-virgin olive oil for brushing bread
  • Olive oil for brushing grill grate
  • Handful of torn basil and mint for garnish
  • 1/4cup toasted pine nuts or toasted, chopped almonds
  • Extra virgin olive oil and fresh lemon juice, to taste
  1. To prepare the broccoli rabe, remove thick, tough lower ends of stalks. Split lengthwise any stalks that are more than 1/2-inch thick. If you are using young, tender broccoli, prepare it in the same way.
  2. To prepare the mayonnaise marinade: In a large bowl, whisk the mayonnaise with the olive oil, lemon juice, lemon zest, garlic, salt, smoked Spanish paprika, Aleppo pepper, and cumin seed until smooth and emulsified.
  3. To prepare the vegetables: To the bowl of marinade, add the summer squash. Rinse the broccoli rabe thoroughly to remove any grit hiding among the leaves. Add it to the bowl with the summer squash, then toss with the marinade to coat the vegetables evenly. (Don’t dry the broccoli rabe after rinsing — the bit of water clinging to the leaves will thin the marinade and gently steam the stalks as they’re grilling, allowing any tough stalks to get tender.) Allow the vegetables to marinate at room temperature for about 30 minutes, tossing once or twice to make sure they’re evenly coated.
  4. To prepare grill: Meanwhile, prepare a gas grill with all burners on medium, or a prepare a charcoal grill with hot coals. Brush the grilling rack with olive oil.
  5. To grill the vegetables: When the grill is ready, arrange the summer squash rounds evenly across the grill grate. Grill for a few minutes on each side, or until tender and nicely blistered in spots. Remove the squash from grill. Next, arrange the broccoli rabe in a single layer on the grill. Grill for 2 to 3 minutes per side, or until tender and blistered in spots. (Taste if you’re unsure if the stalks are tender.) If the stalks are charring quickly but aren’t tender, spray or drizzle a few drops of water on them. Remove from the grill and place on a large platter or sheet pan to cool. (You don’t want to stack the broccoli rabe while it’s still hot because it’ll lose its crisp, papery texture.)
  6. To grill the bread: Brush each slice of bread (top and bottom) with about about 1 tablespoon of oil, or enough to evenly and thoroughly coat each side. Season with a pinch of kosher salt and a few grinds of pepper. Grill the bread on both sides, checking frequently, until charred in spots, a few minutes per side. Turn down the heat if needed. You want the bread to be crusty but soft in the middle. When the bread is cool enough to handle, cut it into 1/2-inch cubes.
  7. To assemble salad: On a large serving platter, place the bread cubes, grilled broccoli rabe, and summer squash. Garnish with toasted nuts, basil, and mint. Season with kosher salt and pepper to taste, then drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil and lemon juice to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: September 8, 2016

Climatology 2016:  Last week was a bit of a drier week than the rest of August.  This the first full week of September brings the possibility of tropical storm moisture working its way north.  The Southern and eastern part of the state are marked as bullseye for several inches of rain during the days ahead.

It would not take much of a wobble in the storm track for the northern part of the state to be deluged as well.  Or for that matter, for the storm to miss the state completely.

Meanwhile the grasses on the Mesa are heading up and seeding.  Pastures that were at rest through the entire season have grass almost knee high.  Even pastures that were grazed in the spring, or received light grazing in the summer, are heading up and seeding at ankle height.

Mushrooms are appearing, not just in the old cow pies, but is some cases in the pine and juniper needles under the trees.  Most appear on shady north sides where the ground stays damp on the surface, even when the sun shines.

The tropical moisture surge means higher humilities and warmer nights.  Another round of rains would mean another round of pasture growth.  The native grassed of our semi-arid ecosystem are adapted to quick response.

In the cow’s hoof prints rain water collects and concentrates and is absorbed slowly into the soil.  In these spots baby grasses are growing.  More rain now could also give us the first areas in years where the pasture grasses regenerate.

From the Wild:  More rattlesnakes on the move.  Several have shown up around buildings which is not good.  In particular they are approaching wood and lumber piles, and animal feed areas, where there are plenty of fine tasting rodents, well fed on organic and local grain.

One of these beauties was by far the largest snake ever to be noticed around Mesa Top.  7 foot or so, with a body several inches in diameter, and some very vivid black stripes at the tail and a resounding rattle.  Maggie the snake dog (once bitten, now very careful) set up a mad bark-a-thon, alertly watching the king of snakes slowly heading toward a lumber pile. Steve headed it off and caught it, lifting it up with a long stick and dropping it into a big barrel, which was then loaded onto a truck and driven several miles away to a new, rocky shelfed home.

Cow stories:  The cows continue to enjoy the easy life.  Plenty of grass and plenty of water.  They are scattered across several hundred acres of pasture.  They seem to be completely unworried and placated.

Beneficial birds   The meat birds are opened out onto the next ring of pasture.  They are growing quickly and the largest should be ready to process around 4 weeks from now.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of September 1st, 2016

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday September 1st, 2016

Shallots from Chispas Farm

Dino Kale from Synergia Ranch

Patty Pan Squash from Mesa Top Farm

Salad Mix from Mesa Top Farm

Bell Peppers from Owl Peak Farm

Tomatillos from Sol y Tierra

Green Savoy Cabbage from Owl Peak Farm

 

Last minute changes to the share last week

As we sent out in our notice last week, we had to change up the share at the last minute. Our valued farmer and friend Alcides woke up Thursday morning to find that the owner had sent off all the employees to help another farm down South, not knowing he needed them there. He did his best to get everything harvested and drove down, but be the time he got to town, the shares were packed and on their way to sites. We did store the cabbage for this week, it looks great still. We hope everyone understood the last minute issues, and the items we added as replacements made up the difference.

 

Peach Case Deal:

Jam them, freeze them, or just dig in and eat them! A study found that people eat an average of 10 peaches a year, so now is the time to munch away. We have 3 cases this week, 18/20lbs for $15 ea. We will get a few more for next week as well. Our family got 40lbs, and we are working on blanching and freezing what the rest of the family doesn’t eat.

We are also juicing 800lbs as well, which will be available later this year, possibly mixed with our fresh pressed Cider from Dixon we are working on!

Oh, Ghee!

We had a member ask us to look into carrying ghee, specifically the Ancient Organic’s one. After helping us find out more info on it, and convincing us of what an awesome product it is, we decided to give it a try. We had a case shipped in CA, and it sounds like only 2 other places in Santa Fe carry it, and we offer it at a lower price!

What the heck is ghee?

Ghee is a premium cooking oil celebrated for its wonderful taste, nutritional benefits, and medicinal qualities. In India, Ghee has always been a sacred and cherished symbol of auspiciousness, nourishment and healing, especially in the daily rituals of cooking and worship. Ayurveda, the ancient medial science of India, recognizes Ghee as an essential part of a balance diet., and is considers it to be the best fat one can eat. Ghee is the very essence of butter, the end result of a long, slow, careful clarification process that removes all the moisture, milk solids, and impurities. The absence of milk solids and water in ghee make it completely shelf stable and easily digested. Ghee has one of the highest flash points (485 degrees F) of any cooking oil, preventing the creation of free radicals and oxidized molecules common in high temperature cooking.

If anyone would like a flyer on health benefits and used of ghee, and what makes Ancient Organics so unique, we can it in your shares, just ask. Hopefully this is something many of our members really enjoy, and we will continue to carry!

Corn!

All this rain has done wonders for the Schwebach Family’s crops, a little too much in fact. The corn is maturing at a much quicker rate then they expected, as are the other crops, creating a bit of pressure to wrap up the corn and be prepared to harvest their next crop. They are bringing in a ton of corn this week, and we are having some amazing deals to pass along to members. You will have 5 ears of corn in your share this week, but we also have some marketplace specials, 12 ears for just $6! This is our big push on corn, there might be a lingering bit in the future weeks, but this week is the big harvest week!

 

Seafood

We are working on expanding our direct Alaskan seafood connection this year, hopefully to the benefit of our members. We hope to have some prawns, crabs and scallops in the future, and hopefully some additional fish varieties!

 

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Cherokee Tomatoes: on the marketplace

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Chard: on the marketplace

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Kale: Dino, and Curly: on the marketplace

Cucumber, Armenian, marketmore, and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Mexican Grey, Patty Pan & Zucchini: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shishito and Padron Pepper: On the marketplace

Peaches: $1/lb on the marketplace, and in your share!!!

Shallots: On the Marketplace

Green Beans: On the Marketplace

Peaches: On the Marketplace

Corn: Specials on the marketplace

 

Green Tomatillo Salsa

Ingredients
8 ounces (5 to 6 medium) tomatillos, husked and rinsed
Fresh hot green chiles, to taste (roughly 2 serranos or 1 jalapeno), stemmed
5 or 6 sprigs fresh cilantro (thick stems removed), roughly chopped
Scant 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
Salt

Directions
Whether you choose the verdant, slushy, herby freshness of the all-raw tomatillo salsa or the oil-colored, voluptuous, sweet-sour richness of the roasted version, tomatillos are about brightening tang. The buzz of the fresh hot green chile adds thrill, all of which adds up to a condiment most of us simply don’t want to live without.
For the All-Raw version: Roughly chop the tomatillos and the chiles. In a blender or food processor, combine the tomatillos, chiles, cilantro and 1/4 cup water. Process to a coarse puree, then scrape into a serving dish. Rinse the onion under cold water, then shake to remove excess moisture. Stir into the salsa and season with salt, usually a generous 1/4 teaspoon.
For the Roasted version:
Preheat a broiler.
Roast the tomatillos and chiles on a baking sheet 4 inches below a very hot broiler until darkly roasted, even blackened in spots, about 5 minutes. Flip them over and roast the other side, 4 to 5 minutes more will give you splotchy-black and blistered tomatillos and chiles. In a blender or food processor, combine the tomatillos and chiles, including all the delicious juice that has run onto the baking sheet. Add the cilantro and 1/4 cup water, blend to a coarse puree, and scrape into a serving dish. Rinse the onion under cold water, then shake to remove the excess moisture. Stir into the salsa and season with salt, usually a generous 1/4 teaspoon.

Israeli Couscous with Grilled Patty Pan and Shiitake Mushrooms in a Sherry Vinegar, Fresh Herb and Caper Vinaigrette

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Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups Israeli couscous, uncooked
  • 4 Patty Pans, small-medium size cut in six cubes
  • 1 ½ cup large shiitake mushrooms, quartered
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

Vinaigrette:

  • ½ cup red onions, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp. capers in brine, drained
  • 1 tbsp. (15 mL) minced garlic
  • 2 tsp. (10 mL) fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp. (15 mL) fresh basil, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp. (15 mL) chopped chives
  • 2 tbsp. (30 mL) Sherry vinegar
  • ⅓ cup (75 mL) extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
  • ½ cup (125 mL) freshly grated Parmigiano cheese

Instructions

  1. Prepare couscous as per package directions. Set aside
  2. Preheat grill to medium heat. Place grill basket on grill to heat.
  3. To make vinaigrette, whisk all ingredients together. Set aside
  4. Toss Patty Pan with 2 tbsp. olive oil and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Place seasoned patty pan in grill basket and grill 5-6 minutes until tender and grill marks form. Remove and set aside.
  6. Toss shiitake mushrooms with 1 tbsp. olive oil and place in hot grill basket. Grill stirring for 1 -2 minutes until the mushrooms are tender.
  7. Place couscous, patty pan and mushrooms in a large bowl.
  8. Toss couscous gently with the vinaigrette and place on a platter. Garnish with fresh basil.

 

Curried Chickpea Stuffed Patty Pans with a Crispy Shallot and Fresh Cilantro on a Basmati Rice Pilaf

Ingredients

Curried Chickpeas:

  • ¼ cup canola oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, small diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tsp. fresh ginger, minced
  • 4 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. garam masala
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • 1tsp. ground coriander
  • 1 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 – 28 fl oz (796 mL) can of chickpeas, drained
  • Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste
  • 4 large patty pans
  • grilled naan bread

Basmati Pilaf:

  • 2 cups Basmati rice
  • 2 large shallots, thinly sliced
  • 3 tbsp. canola oil
  • ½ cup fresh cilantro, stems removed and finely chopped

Instructions

  1. In a large saucepan over medium heat, heat oil. Add onions and sauté until translucent and soft 4-5 minutes. Add garlic and ginger and sauté for an additional 2-3 minutes.
  2. Add garam masala, turmeric, coriander and cayenne and stir until well coated. Add tomatoes and season with salt and pepper. Cook for 5 to 6 minutes stirring and breaking down the tomatoes.
  3. Add the chickpeas and stir well. Let simmer for 15 minutes until the mixture thickens.
  4. Preheat oven to 400F.
  5. Slice tops off each patty pan and scrape out the center removing all seeds. Place in a large baking sheet and add I cup of water to the bottom of the pan.
  6. Fill each patty pan with curried chickpeas. Place the tops back on to the squash and roast in the oven for 35-40 minutes until soft and lightly browned.
  7. To make the basmati rice, rinse rice with cold water and drain. In a medium pot, add rice and 4 cups of cold water. Bring rice to a boil, turn heat down too low and cover. Let simmer for 5-6 minutes until water has evaporated and rice is tender. Remove from heat and keep covered.
  8. In the meantime, in a small saucepan over medium heat, heat oil. Add shallots and cook for 6-8 minutes until golden and lightly crisp.
  9. Fluff rice with a fork, add shallots and fresh cilantro. Use fork to mix gently.
  10. Serve rice with patty pan and naan.

 

CABBAGE BRAISED WITH SHALLOTS AND PANCETTA

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WHAT YOU’LL NEED:

Knob of butter
8 slices pancetta roughly chopped
4 shallots finely sliced
1 cabbage core & outer leaves removed and cut into 8-10 wedges
Half pint vegetable stock (fresh or from a cube)
Salt and pepper

WHAT TO DO:

  1. In a large frying pan heat the butter until sizzling then cook the pancetta till brown and crisp. Remove from the pan with a slotted spoon and allow to drain on some kitchen paper.
  2. Add the shallots to the pan and cook gently for 6-8 minutes until they are caramelized and soft, remove from the pan to the kitchen paper.
  3. Arrange the cabbage wedges in the pan (add a little more butter if necessary) and cook on each side till brown and caramelized, turn them gently so they don’t break up. Pour in the vegetable stock to half way up the cabbage. Return the shallots to the pan and season to taste.
  4. Cook the cabbage for 10-12 minutes gently turning half way through. The cabbage should be tender and the stock reduced, serve 2 wedges per person drizzled with the braising liquid and scattered with pancetta.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: September 1, 2016

Climatology 2016:  At Mesa Top we have had a couple of heavy rains and now all of the reservoirs and ponds are full.  The ephemeral creek is trickling.  The spring boxes are full.

The soils are saturated.  Even the slightest sprinkle of rain brings out the deep color and rich damp smell of the soil.  Weeds are sprouting under the trees in the deep wet needles.

The pinon are filling out.  Crickets are chirping as they would in a humid climate far from New Mexico

Nights are very cool and daytime temps have also been cool for long enough that it is tempting to put a fire in the fireplace.

3 weeks until fall equinox.  Really?  Yes, really!

From the Wild:  All quiet, the wild communities are full, satisfied, enjoying the easy living of the cool, wet spell.  The most confused species are the snakes.  Cold blooded, they need external warmth to get their energy up.  A rattlesnake went on the move in response to the warmup after one of the big rains.  Poor critter encountered dogs, then people, then dogs, and retreated.  Every time it tried to move, it came across an obstacle.  Finally, as it had taken up a position close to people and pets, it had to be moved.  Uncovering its hiding lace, there was a second rattler, and the two were coiled up together.  One was active and protective, the other was calm and docile.  Probably a mating pair, and the spot that they had chosen was not going to work.

They were successfully a safely relocated to a rocky area with good sun, just a couple of hours before another major downpour.

Cow stories:  The cows are moving across grass that is growing faster than they can eat it.  With the herd size that we have reached, a couple of dozen plus accompanying calves and bulls, this is a first.  Plenty of grass, plenty of water.  Easy living.

Beneficial birds   The meat birds are out on pasture now.  Moved out just in time to take shelter from a drenching rain.  Everything went well, they went to cover and waited out the rain and then went out to play in the mud.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of August 25th, 2016

Check out the Webstore:

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday August 25th, 2016

Golden Delicious Apples from English Orchard, AZ

Org Peaches from Colorado

Zucchini from Mesa Top Farm

Beets from Synergia Ranch

Cabbage from Owl Peak Farm

Lettuce from Owl Peak Farm

Corn from Schwebach Farm

Pumba Onions w/Greens from Owl Peak Farm

 

Lots of Fruit again!

We have 3lbs of Golden Delicious Apples from English Family Orchard in Willcox, AZ in your share this week. Additionally, we have a healthy share of peaches from Southern Colorado. These are slightly blemished fruits, but like the apricots, we got them at an incredible bargain for members. If you are feeling overwhelmed with the fruits, we suggest taking a little time to preserve them, or maybe a make up a fresh fruit pie.

Corn!

All this rain has done wonders for the Schwebach Family’s crops, a little too much in fact. The corn is maturing at a much quicker rate then they expected, as are the other crops, creating a bit of pressure to wrap up the corn and be prepared to harvest their next crop. They are bringing in a ton of corn this week, and we are having some amazing deals to pass along to members. You will have 5 ears of corn in your share this week, but we also have some marketplace specials, 12 ears for just $6! This is our big push on corn, there might be a lingering bit in the future weeks, but this week is the big harvest week!

 

Harvest Dinner

Please join us for a night of celebrating our abundant lands that provide so much for us, the stewards of the land that toil endlessly to cultivate the land, the chefs that transform every crop into a work of art, and the organizations that work tirelessly to protect our lands!

 

Celebrate New Mexico’s Harvest with the Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust

 

Albuquerque’s Premiere Farm to Fork Event

 

Albuquerque, New Mexico (August 15, 2016) –The Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust (RGALT) invites you to join us in celebrating New Mexico’s abundant harvest at our annual fundraiser event, the 2016 Harvest Dinner, on Sunday, September 11th at the historic Guitierrez Hubbell House in the South Valley from 4pm to starlight.

 

Enjoy a sumptuous feast of local foods and libations prepared by Albuquerque’s finest chefs – Chef Chris Pope of Zinc, Chef Myles Lucero of Seasons, and Chef Frans Dinkelmann. A lively auction showcasing a variety of local goods will spice up the evening.

 

The Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust’s (RGALT) mission is to protect New Mexico’s working farms, ranches, wildlife habitat and open space for all New Mexicans. We work with private landowners interested in protecting the conservation values of their land and water for future generations.  Our vision of the Middle Rio Grande valley is a landscape rich with vegetation and wildlife, water in the river and ditches, thriving farms and connected rural and urban communities. RGALT is dedicated to preserving the land and water we all cherish.

 

“RGALT’s annual Harvest Dinner is a landmark celebration that allows us to bring together our conservation partners, landowners, and community supporters to embrace and honor New Mexico’s local harvest. It is our intention to create an event in a beautiful, historic setting that exemplifies a part of New Mexico’s diverse cultural history and showcases the products of local farmers, local chefs, and other artisanal food and alcohol producers in our community.  All proceeds from the event will go to further our mission of protecting the place we all love – the Middle Rio Grande – its land and water, for future generations.”

 

The RGALT team and friends look forward to celebrating with you over dinner!

 

Purchase discounted early bird tickets now at www.rgalt.org.

If you are interested in sponsoring our fundraising dinner or a farmer’s attendance (you can request that a Beneficial Farmer attend, it would be a wonderful gesture) at our event, please contact Cecilia Rosacker at ceciliam@rgalt.org or 505-270-4421.

 

Basil Deals

We are offering a discount on Basil in Bulk, for anyone that wants to stock up for pesto making or other dishes. $12.99/lb!

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Cherokee Tomatoes: on the marketplace

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Chard: on the marketplace

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: on the marketplace

Young Potatoes: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Kale: Dino, and Curly: on the marketplace

Cucumber, marketmore, and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Patty Pan & Zucchini: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shishito Pepper: On the marketplace

Peaches: $1/lb on the marketplace, and in your share!!!

Shallots: On the Marketplace

 

Carla’s Peach Jalapeño Jam

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Ingredients

  • 3½ lb. ripe yellow peaches
  • 1½ c. sugar
  • 1 small jalapeño chile
  • 5 strip lemon peel
  • ¼ c. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tsp. Kosher salt

Directions

  1. In large colander, toss peaches and sugar until well mixed. Set over large bowl and let stand for 30 minutes. Reserve accumulated juices for anything you’d like, for example, tea, dessert, or cocktails.
  2. In large saucepan, bring peaches, jalapeño, lemon peel and juice, and salt to a boil. Adjust heat to simmer and cook for 30 minutes.
  3. With potato masher, lightly mash fruit. Discard lemon peel. Ladle mixture into sterilized canning jars and jar properly or refrigerate for up to 3 months.

 

Cabbage and Caramelized Onion Tart

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INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium onions, cut in half root to stem, then thinly sliced across the grain
  •  Salt
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 small cabbage, shredded or chopped (about 6 cups)
  •  Freshly ground pepper
  • 4 eggs
  • ¾ cup low-fat milk
  • ½ cup, tightly packed (2 ounces) Gruyère cheese
  • 1 yeasted olive oil pie crust (1/2 recipe)

 

PREPARATION

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large, heavy nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the onions, and cook, stirring, until they begin to sizzle and soften, about three minutes. Add a generous pinch of salt and the garlic. Stir everything together, turn the heat too low, cover and cook slowly for 45 minutes, stirring often, until the onions are very soft, sweet and light brown. Meanwhile, heat the remaining olive oil over medium heat in another large skillet. Add the cabbage. Cook, stirring often, until it begins to wilt, then add salt and pepper to taste. Continue to cook for another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring often, until the cabbage is tender and fragrant. Stir in the onions, simmer together uncovered for about five minutes or until there is no longer any liquid in the pan, and remove from the heat.
  2. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Oil a 9- or 10-inch tart pan and line with the dough. Beat the eggs and milk in a bowl and season with salt (about 1/2 teaspoon) and pepper. Stir in the onions, cabbage and cheese, and combine well. Scrape into the tart pan, and place in the oven. Bake 40 to 45 minutes until the top is lightly browned.

 

Roasted Beet and Corn Salad with Tangerine Vinaigrette

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Ingredients

Yields: 8 servings

4 red beets (and/or golden beets)
2 (8.75 ounces) cans corn kernels, drained
1/2 tablespoon molasses
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon white pepper
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns, freshly cracked using a mortar and pestle
1/2 tablespoon light corn syrup
3/4 cup grapeseed oil (or any other neutral oil)
4 tangerines (or any fragrant citrus such as Meyer lemons)
1/3 cup lemon juice, freshly squeezed
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1-1/2 tablespoons horseradish mustard
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 cloves pickled garlic, finely minced
1-1/2 tablespoons fresh dill, + extra for garnish

Directions

For the tangerine-infused oil:

Zest and squeeze the tangerines. Finely minced the zest. Reserve the juice and about a teaspoon of zest for the vinaigrette.

In a small saucepan, heat the oil with the cracked black peppercorns and the tangerine zest over medium-low (do not reach a boil) and cook for about 5 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely.

Strain the oil through a fine mesh sieve (or a double-layered cheese cloth) and discard all the pepper solids and zest.

For the roasted beets:

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Wash the beets. Scrub them under tap water. Remember to trim off a little piece from the ends of the root. Cut into thirds, horizontally. No need to peel the beets. Once they are roasted, the peels will rub right off.

Place in a large bowl. Drizzle with about 2-3 tablespoons of tangerine-infused oil. Season with kosher salt and pepper. Toss well. Wrap each beet (3 pieces) in aluminum foil. Place the 4 aluminum wrappers on a baking sheet.

Roast for about 50-55 minutes. Let the beets cool completely in the aluminum wrappers for about an hour and a half. Wipe the skins off using paper towels.

Peel and dice the beets into 1-inch cubes. Chill in the refrigerator until you’re ready to serve.

For the tangerine vinaigrette:

In a bowl, dissolve the sugar in the lemon juice. Add the mustard. Set aside.

Using a strainer, remove the pulp of the tangerine juice. Place the tangerine juice in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, then immediately decrease the heat to a gentle simmer for a little less than 5 minutes. Add the finely chopped tangerine zest. The liquid should reduce to about a tablespoon of tangerine juice. Remove from the heat. Add salt and immediately emulsify the vinaigrette with the remaining tangerine-infused oil while the juice is still hot. Add the mustard / lemon juice mixture. Add the pickled garlic. Finish with white pepper.

Assembly time:

Remove the diced beets from the refrigerator 15 minutes before serving to bring them back to room temperature.

In a large bowl, combine the diced beets and corn kernels. Drizzle with tangerine vinaigrette. Toss well. Garnish with dill.

PEACH PIE BISCUIT BOMBS

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 package refrigerated Immaculate Flaky Biscuits (or homemade biscuit dough)
  • 1 cup sliced fresh peaches (1″ pieces)
  • 3-4 ounces soft Brie cheese
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon honey (optional)
  • 3 tablespoons butter

 

Directions

  • Preheat the oven to 375F.
  • Split the biscuits in half. Place 3-4 pieces of peach in the center of the bottom half of each biscuit. Add a small spoonful of the Brie (about a teaspoon). the sprinkle them all with brown sugar and cinnamon. Drizzle with a little honey (if you are using it).
  • Place the top back on each biscuit and gently press the edges down to lightly seal and close. Take each one in your hand and gently form into balls so the biscuit is wrapped all the way around the filling. Place them about 2″ apart on an ungreased baking sheet.
  • Put the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Melt it and then let it snap and crackle in the pan until it smells nutty. Remove from the heat. Brush each bomb with the browned butter, making sure to get the browned bits from the bottom of the pan.
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes. the tops will be golden.
  • Brush the pie bombs with the brown butter again after baking and serve warm.

 

Ground Turkey Lettuce Wraps

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Ingredients

  • 1 small onion, diced (approx. 1 cup)
  • 1 medium (196 grams) zucchini, diced
  • 3 ounces (150 grams) mushrooms (about 8-10 medium), diced
  • 6 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 1-pound lean ground turkey
  • 1/2 cup tomato sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder (or Tex-Mex spice mix)
  • 24 leaves butter lettuce
  • 8 tablespoons sour cream

Directions

Heat large sauté pan over medium heat. Add oil, onion, mushrooms and zucchini to pan and cook 3-4 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 30 more seconds.

Add ground turkey and increase heat to medium-high. Cook until no longer pink, about 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally to break up the meat.

Add tomato sauce, sugar, chili powder and salt to turkey, and stir to combine.

Remove from stove. To serve, spoon 1/4 cup turkey mixture onto one lettuce leaf. Top each wrap with 1 teaspoon of sour cream, and enjoy.

 

Golden Delicious Apple and Cheddar Turnovers with Dried Cranberries

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Ingredients

SERVINGS: MAKES 8

  • 2 medium Golden Delicious apples, peeled, halved, cored, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 2 1/2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 cups (loosely packed) coarsely grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup sweetened dried cranberries
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 17.3-ounce package frozen puff pastry (2 sheets), thawed
  • 1 large egg, beaten with 1 teaspoon water to blend (for glaze)
  • Sugar

Preparation

  • Toss first 6 ingredients in medium bowl to blend. DO AHEAD Can be made 2 hours ahead. Cover and chill.
  • Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven; preheat to 400°F. Line 2 large rimmed baking sheets with parchment. Roll out 1 puff pastry sheet on lightly floured surface to 11-inch square. Using 5- to 5 1/2-inch plate or bowl as template, cut out 4 rounds from pastry. Transfer pastry rounds to 1 baking sheet, spacing apart. Repeat with second pastry sheet, placing rounds on second baking sheet. Spoon filling onto half of each pastry round, dividing all of filling among rounds. Brush edges of pastry lightly with some of egg glaze. Fold plain pastry half over filling; press on edges to seal and enclose filling completely, then press tines of fork along pastry edge to create tight seal. Using tip of small sharp knife, cut two 1/2-inch-long slits in top of crust on each turnover. Brush tops with egg glaze, then sprinkle with sugar.
  • Bake turnovers until crusts are puffed and golden and juices are bubbling through slits in crusts, about 25 minutes. Carefully run metal spatula under turnovers to loosen and transfer to racks to cool slightly. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: August 25th, 2016

Climatology 2016:  The theatre of the sky continues to impress.  The rains have been nicely spaced. Mostly the rain comes in evening hours.  Rainfall has generally been slow and soaking.  There has been plenty of sun in the day time, not a lot of wind, and moderate temperatures.  The pastures have responded with rich and rapid growth.

One rarity is that there are weeds sprouting in the pine and juniper needles under the trees. That does not happen most years

The moderate temperatures during day, and the cooling effects or rain every night, and the regular frontal passages are creating a distinctly fall feel.  Night time temps at mesa top have fallen below 50 degrees already, at least 2 weeks ahead of when this would be expected.

The fruits from the valleys of New Mexico are also coming in 2 to 3 weeks early.  It is as if the climate fast forwarded: just as summer heat came early, so now an early, cool fall.  Does this suggest an early winter with snow in November?  Or a long easy comfortable fall…

From the Wild:  Bird species are on the increase.  A great blue heron appeared in one of the smaller ponds.  Humming birds buzz about enjoying all kinds of flowers.  A Mountain bluebird appeared.  The swallows are raising their second clutch of eggs for the season, which is a sign of favorable conditions. There were about 2 dozen ducks on the reservoir last weekend.

Cow stories:  The cows on the open pasture are showing their grassland management skills.  For several weeks they avoided the far western sections of the pasture, totaling about 80 acres, until the east end was fairly well grazed.  This resulted in a fairly rich stand there, so they head over and cleaned up for 2 or 3 days.  During that time the rains kicked some more pasture growth into gear.  And the cows headed up to the north end of the pasture, which also had been left to grow.  Soon when they return to Center, there will have been a fresh growth spurt put on there as well.

Our pastures are not big and neither is our herd. It does seem though that the cows understand the country that supports them, and instinctively move around it in what looks like an organized way.

There is enough water in the smaller water holes that the total distances that they have to move between food and water are as small as they can be for the far flung pastures.  Sometimes when the only water is at home, they walk as much as 2.5, miles from far edge of pasture to get to water.  Now the walk is no more than ½ mile.

It is nice when the conditions on the ground make the cows and the farmer’s lives easier.

Beneficial birds   Amazing how quickly the meat birds grow.  Their diet of organic grains, plenty of alfalfa and straw, and also whole wheat are going to result in a very tasty finish

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of August 18th, 2016

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday August 18th, 2016

Chard from Owl Peak Farm

Grapes from Chispas Farm

Salad Mix from Mesa Top Farm

Cantaloupe from Freshies NM

Poblano and Padron Peppers from Owl Peak and Sol y Tierra

Green Onions from Sol y Tierra

 

 

Lots of Fruit again!

We have grapes in the share this week!! They are small, a little tart, and tasted amazing, bringing an exciting new fruit to our local selection that we rarely see! On top of that, not literally because we would then have grape juice, we have some awesome cantaloupes! From Freshies, Org Certified, we have some big melons in the share this week, about 5lbs! It does make for a leaner share because of their size, but we haven’t had any melons all summer. Our farmers are doing an amazing job this season, and we are very grateful for the new relationships we have formed over this summer, welcoming Chispas, Owl Peak, Vida Verde and Silver Leaf Farms to our CSA!

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I am sorry for not getting a full member message out last week, and for the delays at SFP and ST John’s. I was traveling, and experienced car trouble in CO, which interfered with our normal schedule. – Thomas

 

Harvest Dinner

We are now coming up on Autumn, and I have yet to see my vision of a Beneficial Farm dinner come to fruition. It will happen one day, we might be able to do one this fall at our farm, we just need to wait and see.

We are however working on a benefit dinner in the mean time! As we must crawl before we can run, we are supporting and collaborating with 3 amazing chefs in Albuquerque for the Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust Harvest Dinner. Please join us for a night of celebrating our abundant lands that provide so much for us, the stewards of the land that toil endlessly to cultivate the land, the chefs that transform every crop into a work of art, and the organizations that work tirelessly to protect our lands!

 

Celebrate New Mexico’s Harvest with the Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust

 

Albuquerque’s Premiere Farm to Fork Event

 

Albuquerque, New Mexico (August 15, 2016) –The Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust (RGALT) invites you to join us in celebrating New Mexico’s abundant harvest at our annual fundraiser event, the 2016 Harvest Dinner, on Sunday, September 11th at the historic Guitierrez Hubbell House in the South Valley from 4pm to starlight.

 

Enjoy a sumptuous feast of local foods and libations prepared by Albuquerque’s finest chefs – Chef Chris Pope of Zinc, Chef Myles Lucero of Seasons, and Chef Frans Dinkelmann. A lively auction showcasing a variety of local goods will spice up the evening.

 

The Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust’s (RGALT) mission is to protect New Mexico’s working farms, ranches, wildlife habitat and open space for all New Mexicans. We work with private landowners interested in protecting the conservation values of their land and water for future generations.  Our vision of the Middle Rio Grande valley is a landscape rich with vegetation and wildlife, water in the river and ditches, thriving farms and connected rural and urban communities. RGALT is dedicated to preserving the land and water we all cherish.

 

“RGALT’s annual Harvest Dinner is a landmark celebration that allows us to bring together our conservation partners, landowners, and community supporters to embrace and honor New Mexico’s local harvest. It is our intention to create an event in a beautiful, historic setting that exemplifies a part of New Mexico’s diverse cultural history and showcases the products of local farmers, local chefs, and other artisanal food and alcohol producers in our community.  All proceeds from the event will go to further our mission of protecting the place we all love – the Middle Rio Grande – its land and water, for future generations.”

 

The RGALT team and friends look forward to celebrating with you over dinner!

 

Purchase discounted early bird tickets now at http://www.rgalt.org.

If you are interested in sponsoring our fundraising dinner or a farmer’s attendance (you can request that a Beneficial Farmer attend, it would be a wonderful gesture) at our event, please contact Cecilia Rosacker at ceciliam@rgalt.org or 505-270-4421.

 

Basil Deals

We are offering a discount on Basil in Bulk, for anyone that wants to stock up for pesto making or other dishes. $12.99/lb!

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Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Grapes: In your share and on the marketplace

Salad Mix: on the marketplace

Padron Peppers: on the marketplace

Cherokee Tomatoes: on the marketplace

Green Beans: on the marketplace

Green Chili: on the marketplace

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Chard: on the marketplace

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: on the marketplace

Young Potatoes: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Gold Nugget Cherry Tomatoes: on the marketplace

Kale, Dino, Red Russian and Curly: on the marketplace

Cucumber, marketmore, Armenian and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Patty Pan & Zucchini: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

 

Stuffed Poblano Peppers

stuffed-poblano-peppers

Prep and Cool time 25 mins

Cook time 20 mins

Total time 45 mins

 

Author: Vered DeLeeuw

Yield: 4 peppers

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil for the pan
  • 4 medium poblano peppers (1 lbs. total weight w/ refuse, 12 oz. cleaned )
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 medium tomatoes, diced (10 oz.)
  • ½ medium onion, diced (4 oz.)
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 cups cooked chicken breast, shredded (10 oz.)
  • 1 cup part skim mozzarella, shredded (4 oz.)
  • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • ½ cup cheddar, shredded (2 oz.)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line a large baking sheet with foil and brush it with a little olive oil.
  2. Rinse and dry the poblanos. Cut a thin slice off the tops and remove the core and seeds. Cut a slit down the side of each pepper. Set aside.
  3. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the tomatoes, onion, garlic, oregano, cumin and salt. Cook, stirring often, until liquids have evaporated, about 7 minutes. Off heat, stir in the chicken, the mozzarella and the cilantro, mixing well.
  4. Divide the filling among the peppers, adding it from the top and pressing on it to fill the entire pepper. Place the stuffed peppers on the prepared baking sheet. Bake 20 minutes, until the poblanos are soft and charred in places (the smell will be amazing!).
  5. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and switch the oven to broil. Top the peppers with the cheddar cheese and broil just until the cheese is melted, about 2 minutes. Allow to rest 5 minutes before serving.

Summer Corn Montadito with Padrón Peppers and Shaved Manchego

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Serves 4 to 6

INGREDIENTS

1 sweet baguette
¾ cup olive oil
Salt
2 ears corn, shucked
1 tablespoon butter
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 chopped teaspoon rosemary
½ teaspoon smoked paprika
20 to 25 padrón peppers (one or two per toast, depending on size)
½ cup shaved Manchego cheese

PREPARATION

  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Slice the baguette on a slight angle into ¼-inch-thick by 2-inch slices. Lay the toasts on a cookie sheet. Use a pastry brush to dab a little of the olive oil on top of each toast. Season lightly with salt and place pan in oven. Bake until toasts are golden brown and crisp. Let cool.
  2. Use a knife to cut the kernels off of the cobs. You should end up with 2 to 3 cups of kernels. Set aside. Use the back of the knife to scrape the corn “milk” from each cob into a bowl. Set aside.
  3. Heat a large sauté pan over high heat. When hot, add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Sauté the corn until lightly caramelized, about 2 to 3 minutes. Season with salt and set aside.
  4. Heat a small pot or pan over medium low heat. Melt the butter, then add the garlic. Cook for a few minutes, until the garlic is fragrant and lightly cooked. Add the rosemary and pimentón dulce and cook for another minute. Add the corn milk, season with salt, and cook for 5 more minutes. You will end up with a corn mush. Combine the corn kernels with the corn mush. Let cool to room temperature.
  5. Heat a sauté pan over high heat. Add about ½ cup olive oil. When the oil is nearly smoking, add half the padrón peppers. Sauté until blistered and slightly browned. Transfer to a plate lined with paper towels. Season lightly with salt. Repeat with the remaining peppers.
  6. To assemble the montaditos, spread one heaping tablespoon of corn mixture on each toast and sprinkle with salt. Top with shaved Manchego, then a padrón pepper or two.

Grape, Toasted Almond, and Sweet-Onion Salad

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Ingredients

3/4 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon plus 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

5 tablespoons roasted almond oil

1 package (12 oz.) salad mix with sturdy greens, especially radicchio

1 sweet onion such as Walla Walla, peeled and cut into half-moons

2 cups seedless red grapes, cut in half

1 cup toasted sliced almonds

Preparation

In a bowl, whisk salt, lemon juice, and oil. Toss with remaining ingredients.

 

Melon Ball Salad with Mint and Prosciutto

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Method:

  1. Cut your melon in half and scoop out the seeds.
  2. With a melon-baller, ball your melon halves, until you can ball them no longer. (alternately, you can just cut cubes … if you’d like … the balls are just to have a different kind of shape).
  3. Mix together your melon, prosciutto, olive oil, mint and salt and pepper.
  4. Serve!

Tamagoyaki with Green Onions Recipe

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Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 3 green onions (chopped)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp soy sauce
  • 1/4 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp oil

Instructions

  1. Mix eggs, salt, soy sauce and Mirin (or sugar) in a bowl. Mix in green onions.
  2. Heat a pan at medium high temperature and add oil. (Tamagoyaki pan or a round 8-9 inch non-stick pan)
  3. Pour a thin layer of egg mixture in the pan, tilting to cover the bottom of the pan. After the thin egg has set a little, gently roll into a log. Start to roll when the bottom of the egg has set and there is still liquid on top. If you let the egg cook too much, it will not stick as you roll the log. Now you have a log at one end of the pan. You can leave it there or move it to the other end. Pour some more egg mixture to again cover the bottom of the pan. After the new layer has set, roll the log back onto the cooked thin egg and roll to the other end of the pan.
  4. Repeat adding egg to the pan and rolling until the egg is used up.

  1. Remove from the pan and cool for 3-4 minutes.
  2. Trim the ends of the log off and then slice the log into 1/2″ pieces.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: August 18th, 2016

Climatology 2016:  The monsoon continues to deliver.  At Mesa Top we had a few days/nights in succession with rain over the weekend.  The total rainfall was not enormous, but the timing, intensity, and frequency kicked more pasture growth into gear.

The rains are at rest now with lots of sun, and a promise of more precipitation later in the week.

The monsoon weather pattern that has been established for the last couple of weeks is also being enhanced by spring-like cold fronts, which sweep down the front range and then back westward across the state, running into the warm, moist air streaming up from Mexico.  This scenario creates very powerful storms, often with hail.

Sunday at Mesa Top we had one of the classic cold enhanced cloudbursts where we sit under the edge of a cloud, and can see blue sky on 2 or 3 sides, while it pours in a small area

The theatre of the sky is a spectacle at last.

From the Wild:  Mosquito invasion! No creature loves the rainy season at more than the opportunistic mosquito.  No Zika, but lots of blood loss to the voracious biters.

The reservoir at mesa top is about half full and already 2 pairs of ducks have returned.  If we could keep water in there, at about the current level, and build shore habitat brush piles that would help also provide cover for returning vegetation, it is very likely that we would have duck n the pond all season and ducklings along with.

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Cow stories:  Cows are out on a large pasture area where the grass is at last growing fast enough that they are feasting on greenery and not mowing the grass down to nothing in the process.

They move across the pasture, eating steadily.  They are not in such luxurious conditions that they can eat themselves full in a small radius and then sit and wait for their rumens to do the digesting.  They graze steadily for several hours and then sit and chew their cuds.

Everyone looks full and their coats are shiny…

Beneficial birds   Repeat from last week only more so:  the meat chicks are growing quickly as evidenced by their ravenous appetites.  It is interesting to observe how they are not concerned at all by the noise and chill of rain in the day time but if it comes at night they are very easily disturbed

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

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