Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of May 25th, 2017

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday May 25th, 2017

Little Gem Lettuces from Vida Verde
Braising Mix from Vida Verde
Spinach from Preferred Produce
Cucumber from Preferred Produce
Vine Tomatoes from Preferred Produce
Zucchini from from Preferred Produce
Red Bell Peppers from Preferred Produce

Time to Spice Things Up!!!
We are pleased to share with you that we are launching a Spice Share. Once a month, on the first Thursday, people that have signed for the spice share will receive 3 different, unique spices with their normal order, along with recipe that use them. These spices will have a theme each month, sometimes it will be regional like Ethiopian, Peruvian or some months it will be a cooking topic like BBQ or Holiday baking.

We have partnered with Savory Spice shop, to help us find these spices, and help our membership understand what to do with them. Every week, we find lots of cool local foods for your share that challenge your cooking, and expand your skill set. The spice club is designed to do the same thing, but with spices from around the world, so you can explore all culinary flavors of world from your home. The owner of Savory Spice, has worked for 13 years in the spice world, also teaching History of Spice at the community college, so we are in great hands. We might even include a spice in your farm share when there are all the other ingredients for an amazing dinner.

Frankincense Tears, Juniper Berry Spice, Tikka Masala, there are so many new amazing spices to discover so let the journey begin! The first Spice Share will be available next week, we will let you know next Monday what we decide to do to kick this off, we promise it will not be disappointing!

100520504-spices

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Salad Mix: On the marketplace
Cilantro: On the marketplace
Sage: On the marketplace
Tarragon: On the marketplace
Spearmint: On the marketplace
Napa Cabbage: On the marketplace
Mustard Greens: On the marketplace
Purple Top Turnips: On the marketplace
Long Japanese Turnips: On the marketplace
Diakon Radish: On the marketplace
Spring Onions: On the marketplace
Swiss Chard: On the marketplace
Bok Choy: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Zucchini and Spinach Gratin 

zucchini-spinach-gratin
Ingredients
• 2 lbs zucchini
• Kosher salt
• 1 lb frozen spinach*
• 3 slices of thick cut bacon (about 3 ounces), cut crosswise 1/4-inch pieces
• 1 large onion
• 1 handful of parsley (about 1/2 cup of leaves, lightly packed)
• 3 cloves garlic, peeled, coarsely chopped
• 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
• Freshly ground black pepper
• 3 eggs
• Olive oil
* Or 6 packed cups of fresh chopped spinach leaves, blanched and drained
Method
1 Grate the zucchini. Toss the grated zucchini with about a teaspoon of Kosher salt. Place the grated zucchini in a large sieve (or colander) placed over a bowl to catch the water as the salt helps the zucchini release its moisture. Let sit for 30 minutes or so, then squeeze out the remaining excess moisture with paper towels or a clean tea towel.
2 Thaw the spinach, let drain while the zucchini is draining. Then squeeze out the excess moisture with paper towels or a tea towel.
3 Heat a large skillet on medium heat. Add the bacon and gently cook until lightly browned and most of the fat rendered out, about 10 minutes.
4 While the bacon is cooking, peel and finely chop the onion. Add the onions to the bacon and cook for an additional 10 minutes, until the onions have softened.
5 While the bacon and onions are cooking, prepare the parsley and garlic. Place the parsley and garlic with a small pinch of salt into a food processor and pulse just a couple of times.
6 Preheat the oven to 350°F.
7 Place the zucchini into a large bowl. With a wooden spoon, mix in the cooked onions and bacon. Mix in the spinach, parsley, and garlic. Mix in half of the Parmesan. Taste, and add black pepper and more salt to taste. Mix in the eggs.
8 Coat the bottom and sides of a 2 quart casserole or gratin dish with a tablespoon of olive oil. Put the zucchini spinach mixture into the dish and pack it down. Sprinkle the remaining Parmesan cheese over the top and drizzle with a little olive oil.
9 Bake in a 350°F oven for 40-45 minutes, until the top is nicely browned. Serve immediately. Reheats well.

Tomato & Cucumber Sandwich  

recipe-of-cucumber-sandwich

Ingredients
Bread – 6 slices
Mayo – to spread, as needed
Cucumber – 1, thinly sliced
Tomato – 1 large, thinly sliced
Black pepper – to taste
Salt – to taste
Chat masala – to taste
Butter – to toast the sandwiches

How to Make Tomato Cucumber Sandwich
Start by applying generous amount of mayonnaise on both the slices for a sandwich.
Place cucumber slices as shown in the picture.
Season it with some salt, pepper and chat masala.
Place 3-4 tomato slices. Season the tomato slices with some salt, pepper and chat masala as well.
Pack the sandwich with another bread slice, mayo side in. If you do not have a sandwich maker, you can toast the sandwich on tawa as well.
Heat a tawa or a griddle. Place the sandwich on it.
Apply a coat of butter on the outside on both sides. Toast the sandwich till it becomes golden brown and crispy.
Press it gently with the spatula while toasting to pack it well. Healthy tomato and cucumber sandwich is ready. Cut in into 2 halves and serve hot. Enjoy!

Little Gem Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette 

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INGREDIENTS
• 1 cup walnut halves
• 1 tablespoon walnut oil
• Kosher salt
• 1 small shallot, minced
• 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
• 1 tablespoon Champagne vinegar
• 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
• Freshly ground pepper
• 4 ounces yellow squash, thinly sliced
• 3 thin red onion slices, separated into rings
• 4 heads Little Gem lettuce
• 1/4 cup freshly grated Pecorino Romano cheese, plus more for serving
HOW TO MAKE THIS RECIPE
Preheat the oven to 350;. Toast the walnuts on a pie plate until golden, 12 minutes. Let cool, then coarsely chop the nuts. Transfer to a bowl and toss with the walnut oil and a pinch of salt. In a small bowl, combine the shallot, lemon juice and vinegar and season with salt. Let stand for 10 minutes. Slowly whisk in the olive oil and season with pepper.
In a large bowl, toss the squash with the onion, lettuce, walnuts, pecorino and half of the dressing and serve. Reserve the remaining dressing for another use.
Zucchini and Bell Pepper Stir Fry 

zucchini_and_bell_pepper_stir_fry_recipe
Ingredients
• 2 Green zucchini , cut into long stripes
• 2 Red Bell pepper (Capsicum) , de-seeded and cut into stripes
• 1 Onion , thinly sliced
• 3 cloves Garlic , finely chopped
• 1 teaspoon Fresh Thyme leaves
• 1 teaspoon Dried oregano
• 1 teaspoon Red Chilli flakes
• 1 tablespoon Extra Virgin Olive Oil
• Salt , to taste
Directions for Zucchini and Bell Pepper Stir Fry Recipe
1. To begin making Zucchini and Bell Pepper Stir Fry Recipe, wash, dry and cut the zucchinis and bell peppers into long stripes and keep aside.
2. Heat olive oil in a wok, add the finely chopped garlic and saute till it turns golden color.
3. Add the sliced onion and saute until it turns translucent.
4. Add in the zucchini and red bell pepper stripes, season with salt and flash fry them for a minute.
5. Add in the oregano, thyme and red chilli flakes and saute for another minute and switch off the flame.
6. Flavor it with your favorite herbs and serve the Zucchini and Bell Pepper Stir Fry Recipe along with Beetroot soup for a light yet nutritious weeknight dinner.

From the Mesa Top: May 25, 2017
Climatology 2017: It snowed again last week… in Taos it even accumulated a bit on the grass. A VERY cold night followed: mid 20s at Mesa Top. Now back to seasonable temps and some wind. No serious warmup in site. No immediate likelihood of storms or precipitation either,
From the Wild: Yellow clover and New Mexico Sunflowers are growing fast. Even the first few red cactus flowers have appeared on south facing, favored warm spots. Purple Penstemen is the latest wildflower to flower in the pastures.
Cow stories: The last round of moving the cows across the nearby pastures will be done in the next couple of days.
Watching the cows as they graze, it is easy to see that the larger cows have problems grazing the shorter grass. This makes sense because of the way cows graze. They don’t nip off the grass with sharp front teeth, like horses, goats, and sheep. They wrap their tongues around the clump of grass and pull it. This makes it more difficult for cows to overgraze than other grazers.
This also spells difficulty for the cows with the biggest tongues as the grass gets short. As a result the big cows (about 7 total who are 5 years old or more) are coming back and bellowing for hay every evening.
They will be kicking up their heels when they get to the new pasture
We have had eyes on the Forest Trust pasture and our Northern State Lease. Both look good and both are available. One last assessment of their condition later this week and we will chose a pasture and move those cows.
There are several cows also that are looking positively huge, and should be calfing in the next few weeks.
We will have to decide whether to hold back the heavy cows.
From the garden: All of the zucchini are out. Plus the pumpkins. The greenhouse repairs will complete this week, and then the cukes will fill it up.
Also the butternut squash will be planted out and then it is time to start weeding.
The zukes generally fed very well under the row covers during the cold nights last week.
We are hoping that by starting early, and transplanting early, and protecting them well under row covers, that we will have early fruit…
Beneficial birds: Chickens are fine, eggs are plentiful
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of May 18th, 2017

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday May 18th, 2017

Japanese Salad Turnips from Sol Harvest Farm
Spring Onions from Sol Harvest Farm
Napa Cabbage from Otter Farm
Desiree Potatoes from Jubilee Farm
Arugula from Vida Verde
Mizuna from Vida Verde

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Easter Egg Radishes: On the marketplace
Salad Mix: On the marketplace
Sweet Salad Turnips: On the marketplace
Baby Diakon Radish: On the marketplace
Spring Onions: On the marketplace
Tokyo Bekana: On the marketplace
Frisee: On the marketplace
Swiss Chard: On the marketplace
Shallot Scapes: On the marketplace
Bok Choy: On the marketplace
Desiree Potatoes: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Sautéed Mizuna with Garlic and Fish Sauce 

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INGREDIENTS
• 1 bunch mizuna, about 10 ounces
• 2 cloves garlic, crushed
• 2 tablespoons oil
• 1 teaspoon fish sauce
• 1/4 lemon, fresh
• salt to taste, about 1/4 teaspoon
• freshly ground pepper

DIRECTIONS
1. Wash and drain mizuna. The greens do not have to be completely dry. Roughly chop into 1-inch segments and set aside.
2. Place a wide and shallow pan or a wok over high heat. Add the two tablespoons of oil.
3. Add the crushed garlic and stir around for 5 or so seconds.
4. Add the greens to the wok or pan and saute for 1 minute, stir around constantly. The mizuna should be softened but still crisp. Add the fish sauce and salt and stir around to distribute evenly. Garnish with a squeeze of lemon and freshly ground pepper. Serve warm or tepid.

Shaved turnip salad with arugula and prosciutto  001ec97909631041539d1a
Time:
About 10 minutes
Ingredients
4 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
2 teaspoons honey
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
Pepper
4 small turnips, about 5 ounces, peeled
8 cups arugula, wild if possible
4 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces.
Directions
1. In a small bowl, whisk the vinegar and salt until the salt dissolves. Whisk in the honey, oil and pepper.
2. Using a mandoline or sharp knife, slice the turnips into paper-thin rounds. In a large bowl, combine turnips, arugula and prosciutto. Toss with the dressing. Taste and adjust seasonings if necessary.

Chocolate Potato Cake 

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Ingredients
85g mashed Smooth potatoes (such as Desiree)
150g self-raising flour
20g cocoa powder
170g caster sugar
175g unsalted butter, softened
1 rounded tsp baking powder
2 eggs, beaten
3 tbsp semi-skimmed milk

For the icing
1 orange
150g icing sugar
Method
Cream the butter and sugar together until light in color and creamy. Beat in each egg separately until the mixture is smooth again.
Sieve together the flour, cocoa and baking powder and stir these in lightly to the butter and sugar mixture. Lastly stir in the potato and milk.
Pour the mixture into a greased and lined 10 inch cake tin then bake in a moderate oven 190C / 170C fan / gas mark 5 for 35-40 about minutes or until a skewer comes out from the center cleanly.
Once cooked turn out onto a cooling rack and leave to cool.
For the icing, zest the orange and set the zest to one side. Sieve the icing sugar into a large bowl then whisk in the juice of half an orange to make a thick paste that will pour over the cake but not completely run off.
Pour the icing over the cooled cake then sprinkle over the orange zest

Turkey and Mizuna Salad 

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INGREDIENTS
FOR THE SALAD
• 2 cups mizuna or arugula
• 3 cups shredded or diced cooked turkey
• Salt
• freshly ground pepper
• 1 serrano chili, seeded if desired and chopped optional
• 1 bunch scallions, white part and green, thinly sliced
• 1 small cucumber, seeded, diced and peeled if waxy; or 1/2 long European cucumber, diced
• ¼ cup chopped cilantro
• 1 small red bell pepper, cut in thin strips
• 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped walnuts
• 2 broccoli crowns, cut or broken into small florets, steamed four to five minutes, refreshed with cold water and drained on paper towels optional
FOR THE DRESSING
• 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
• 1 tablespoon seasoned rice wine vinegar
• 1 garlic clove, minced or put through a press
• 2 teaspoons finely minced fresh ginger
• 1 tablespoon soy sauce
• 2 tablespoons dark Chinese sesame oil or walnut oil
• 2 tablespoons canola or peanut oil
• ⅓ cup low-fat buttermilk or plain nonfat yogurt
• 1 tablespoon turkey stock or water, for thinning out if using yogurt
PREPARATION
• Line a platter or large bowl with the mizuna or arugula.
• Season the turkey with salt and pepper, and combine in a large bowl with the chili, scallions, cucumber, cilantro, red pepper and walnuts
• Combine the ingredients for the dressing, and mix well. Toss with the turkey mixture. Arrange on top of the mizuna or arugula and serve.
NAPA CABBAGE SALAD WITH TOASTED ALMONDS 

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Ingredients
• 1 medium Napa cabbage
• 1 bunch of green onions
• 1 cup of slivered almonds
• 1 – 3 ounce package of ramen noodles
• ¼ cup of dried blueberries
• Dressing
• ¼ cup rice vinegar
• ½ cup olive oil
• ¼ teaspoon grated ginger
• 2 Tablespoons of soy sauce
• 1/8 teaspoon of black pepper
Instructions
1. Cut the bottom off of the cabbage and wash the leaves individually. Dry them and then slice into thin slivers. Cut in half if the leaves are wide.
2. Wash the entire onion (each individually) and cut the ends off. Then slice into thin rounds.
3. Spread the almonds out on a large baking sheet with a rim and toast them in the oven. Watch them carefully, shaking the pan every 45 seconds to 1 minute to ensure that they brown evenly. When they are a light brown remove from the oven.
4. Crush the ramen noodle into small pieces on a large baking sheet and toast in the oven until they just begin to brown.
5. Dressing
6. Add all ingredients to a jar with a lid and shake well. Or, whisk well in a bowl.
7. Add all of the ingredients to a LARGE bowl. Add the dressing and toss well.
8. You may prepare the cabbage and onions the day before. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator until ready to use.

From the Mesa Top: May 11, 2017 (Last week)
Climatology 2017: Last week I talked about the cycle of extremes, between wet and dry. Following the big storm of end of April, we have had a 10-day dry cycle. Over the next few days, we may possibly get our next wet “return” of the pendulum, with the possibility another foot of snow at the top of Santa Fe Baldy, and severe thunderstorms with hail at lower elevations.
From the Wild: Around the pond the beginnings of spring weed growth has begun. New Mexico sunflower is germinating. SO is yellow clover and probably some cockleburs too. These plants can grow quickly and provide a thicket to conceal baby birds. The sandpiper pair are established and will find a place to nest. 2 pairs of ducks have been coming and going. It is not easy to say whether they will lay eggs and set there.
Cow stories: We are moving the cows from pasture to pasture every couple or few days. We are trying to allow time for each pasture to grow back.
The process feels strained. We would rather let the pastures grow a lot longer. But by working hard with the pastures closest to home, we are saving the further pastures, which will hopefully provide for longer grazing periods.
imageedit_9_6930313184imageedit_12_74257824271

Another calf was born today. Probably a heifer, but no reason to get too close yet, and make momma worry while trying to check for certain.
Momma is a cow who lost her first calf in fall 2014 when she was chased by dogs (at La Puebla pasture) as she tried to deliver the calf. She fell over in a ditch, could not right herself, and the calf did not survive. She had a neurological issue with her front feet and could not control them and get her balance.
But she was determined and as the days passed she stood up on 3 legs and then started walking gingerly around and slowly the last foot started to work.
We knew that she was ok when she started running and jumping, so we put her back with the herd. Although she is small, she holds her own in the bigger herd just fine.
From the garden: Planting out of the early zucchini continues. Hoping to complete repair of the greenhouse this week and plant out some cucumbers next
Beneficial birds: Chickens are fine, eggs are plentiful
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of May 11th, 2017

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday May 11th, 2017

Kale, White Russian/Red Ruffle Mix from Otter Farm
Toy Choy from Otter Farm
Org Oyster Mushrooms from Freshies
Salad Mix from Vida Verde
Org Cantaloupe from Preferred Produce
Org Cucumber from Preferred Produce

THE ART OF FERMENTATION WITH SANDOR ELLIX KATZ  Our friends at Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen passed along this event, which we think some of our members might be interested in!

9:00am – 12:00pm
Sandor Katz Tent
The Art of Fermentation: Come learn how simple it is to make your own kraut, kimchi, and other fermented delicacies. Learn about the healing qualities and nutritional importance of live-culture ferments, as well as their illustrious history and integral role in human cultural evolution. Empower yourself with simple techniques for fermenting these healthful foods in your home. Be part of the fermentation revival! VIP TICKETS are limited to 100 attendees. The VIP experience includes three-hour hands-on workshop demonstration with Sandor Ellix Katz from 9am – 12pm. Workshop starts promptly at 9am. All VIP attendees will create their own ferment that they can take home with them in an official Fermentation Fest mason jar. Also includes general admission—a full day of vendor samplings and official Fermentation Fest tasting glass.
Sandor Ellix Katz is a fermentation revivalist. His books Wild Fermentation (2003, 2016) and the Art of Fermentation (2012), along with the hundreds of fermentation workshops he has taught around the world, have helped to catalyze a broad revival of the fermentation arts. A self-taught experimentalist who lives in rural Tennessee, the New York Times calls him “one of the unlikely rock stars of the American food scene.” Sandor is the recipient of a James Beard award and many other honors.

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Easter Egg Radishes: On the marketplace
Hinona Kabu Turnips: On the marketplace
Org Oyster Mushrooms: On the marketplace
Toy Choy: On the marketplace
Desiree Potatoes: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
White/Red Kale: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Pissaladière with Oyster Mushrooms and Black Forest Ham 

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Makes two 9″ x 12″ rectangles (recipe can be halved)
The Dough (Like a brioche with a touch of olive oil . . . .)
• 1 tablespoon of active dry yeast
• Pinch of sugar
• 4 eggs
• 4 tablespoons of butter, melted
• 2 tablespoons of fruity olive oil
• 2 tablespoons honey
• 4 cups all-purpose flour (See note below. You can also use a mixture of flours, and add in fresh herbs, if you like.)
1. Proof the yeast in ½ cup of warm water with the pinch of the sugar. (See note below.)
2. In a large bowl, beat together the eggs, oil, honey and salt. Add 1 cup of flour and beat well. Add the melted butter and beat well until combined.
3. Add 1 cup of flour and beat some more. Then add the yeast and water mixture, if the proofed yeast has procreated prolifically (doubling at least in volume), along with the third cup of flour. Beat well.
4. Add the final cup of flour and beat nice and hard. If it’s too difficult to stir once all the flour has been added, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead the remaining flour into the dough. Don’t add any more.
5. Knead only until the flour is fully incorporated. The dough should feel very moist, but it won’t be sticky. It should be easy to work with, as it’s got so much fat in it.
6. Put into a well-oiled bowl, turn it to coat, then cover the bowl with a damp tea towel, and let it rise for 1/2 hour at room temperature. Then refrigerate it for at least 5 -6 hours, or up to 36 hours. (Use 2 teaspoons of yeast if you know you’ll be letting it rise for 24 hours or more.)
7. Take the dough out and let it sit at room temperature for at least an hour before shaping.
8. You can also do a quick rise, at room temperature, for about 1 ½ hours.
9. NB: To make a more interesting crust, I use, instead of the four cups of all-purpose flour, 2/3 cup barley flour, ¼ cup toasted wheat germ, ¼ cup semolina, ¼ cup rye flour, and 2 2/3 cups all-purpose flour. I also add fresh herbs. I like a 2 – 1 ratio of fresh marjoram and rosemary, both finely chopped. For one rectangular pissaladiere, I use a tablespoon of chopped marjoram and 1 1/2 teaspoon chopped rosemary. Fresh thyme and winter savory are also good choices. ;o)
The Deconstructed Duxelles — and Instructions for Assembling and Baking
• 2 medium onions, thinly sliced
• 2 tablespoons butter
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• 2 ounces Black Forest or similar cooked ham (diced) or 4 slices natural bacon
• 1 pound oyster, button, crimini or other mushrooms, thickly sliced
• 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves
• 1/2 cup chopped parsley
• 3 cloves of garlic, coarsely chopped
• 1/2 cup Chablis
• 3/4 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or similar cheese
• Salt and pepper
1. In a large skillet, cook the sliced onions in one tablespoon of butter and one tablespoon of oil with a pinch of salt, stirring occasionally, until soft and a light golden brown. This should take 25 to 30 minutes, or longer, depending on how low the heat is.
2. In another large skillet, cook the bacon until crispy or the ham (using one tablespoon of oil) until lightly browned. Remove and drain the skillet of all but one tablespoon of fat. Add another tablespoon of butter to the skillet.
3. Sauté the chopped mixture in the skillet over medium heat, stirring frequently, for five to ten minutes, until the mushrooms stop releasing liquid.
4. Coarsely chop the bacon if using. Add it (or the cooked ham) and the herbs and garlic to the skillet with the mushrooms, and cook for another minute over medium heat.
5. Push the mushrooms aside, so you can deglaze the pan with the wine over medium heat, stirring constantly. Test for salt and correct.
6. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Roll out the dough and press it with your fingers into two rectangles that are about 10″ x 14″. Fold the edges inward about an inch all around, to create a rim on the rectangle.
7. Layer, in this order, the grated cheese, the onions, and then the mushroom mixture. Then grind some good black pepper over the mixture.
8. Bake in the middle of the oven. Cook for a total of 25 – 30 minutes. The crust should be a nice medium brown.

Stir Fried Bok Choy and Mushrooms 

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INGREDIENTS
o 4 dried Chinese mushrooms
o 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
o 1 garlic clove, minced
o 1 lb bok choy, bite size pieces
o 2 ounces oyster mushrooms
o 2 ounces shiitake mushrooms
o 2 tablespoons oyster sauce
DIRECTIONS
1. Rinse dried mushrooms: Soak in boiling water let stand 30 minutes. Squeeze excess water cut in half and set aside the liquid.
2. Heat oil in wok. Stir fry garlic till brown.
3. Add bok choy 1 minute, add mushrooms for another 2 minutes.
4. Stir in soaking liquid and oyster sauce. Toss and serve.

Minty Cucumber and Cantaloupe Salad 

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• 1 large ripe cantaloupe
• 4 medium cucumbers (or 2 large ones)
• 1/2 tsp. salt
• 8 oz feta cheese, cubed or crumbled
• About a dozen medium-sized mint leaves, very finely chopped
For the Honey-Lime Dressing:
• 1/4 cup olive oil
• 2 tbsp. white wine vinegar
• Juice of one lime
• 2 tbsp. honey
• Salt and pepper to taste
Directions
1. Cut the cantaloupe in half and scoop out the seeds.
2. With a melon baller, carve out as many balls as you can get out of your cantaloupe.
3. Chop the cucumbers in thin, quartered slices.
4. Place the cucumber slices and melon balls in a colander and sprinkle with 1/2 tsp salt, toss gently with your hands. Place the colander over a bowl and allow the juices to drain for about 20 minutes. (Keep the juice for smoothies!)
5. Place the cucumber and cantaloupe balls in a salad bowl. Add the cubed feta and chopped mint.
6. Place all salad dressing ingredients in a lidded jar and shake vigorously.
7. Pour on the salad, toss gently, and serve cold.

Thai Curried Bok Choy with Oyster Mushrooms 

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Ingredients
1 lb Bok choy, baby (or spinach or Swiss chard)
1 T Rice bran oil or peanut oil
8 oz Oyster mushrooms
1 T Curry paste (red or Penang)
2 c Coconut milk
4 Scallions (thinly sliced)
8 oz Tofu, extra firm (optional)

Instructions
Cut the bok choy in half lengthwise, or, if they are very large, into quarters, and then in half crosswise.
Put the rice bran or peanut oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. As soon as the oil is fragrant, add the bok choy and mushrooms, stirring briskly. When the leaves have wilted, about 1 minute, add the curry paste and stir to incorporate. Add the coconut milk and stir. Raise the heat and stir until the mixture comes to a boil. Lower the heat and cook until the bok choy is tender, about 2 to 3 minutes.
Remove from the heat and divide among 4 bowls. Garnish the curry with the sliced scallions and serve at once.

Mushroom Risotto 

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Ingredients
• 2 Tbsp butter
• 2 cups flavorful mushrooms such as shiitake, chanterelle, or oyster mushrooms, cleaned, trimmed, and cut into half inch to inch pieces
• 2/3 cup brandy, vermouth, or dry white wine
• 5-6 cups chicken stock* (use vegetable stock for vegetarian option)
• 1/3 cup of peeled and minced shallots (OR 1/3 cup of yellow or white onion, finely chopped)
• 1 3/4 cups arborio rice or other risotto rice
• 1/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
• Salt and freshly ground black pepper
• 2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley or chives
Method
1 Bring stock to a simmer in a saucepan.
2 Sauté the mushrooms: Melt the butter in a deep, heavy saucepan over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and shallots and sauté about 5 minutes (if using chanterelles, dry sauté first for a minute or two and let the mushrooms cook in their own juices before adding the butter).
3 Add rice and brandy: Add the rice and stir to combine. Add brandy, bring to a boil, and reduce liquid by half, about 3-4 minutes.
4 Add simmering stock, 1/2 cup at a time, stirring enough to keep the rice from sticking to the edges of the pan. Stir the rice almost constantly — stirring sloughs off the starch from the rice, making the creamy sauce you’re looking for in a risotto.
Wait until the stock is almost completely absorbed before adding the next 1/2 cup.
This process will take about 25 minutes. The rice should be just cooked and slightly chewy.
5 Stir in the Parmesan cheese and season to taste with salt and pepper. Garnish with chopped fresh parsley or chives.

From the Mesa Top: May 11, 2017
Climatology 2017: Last week I talked about the cycle of extremes, between wet and dry. Following the big storm of end of April, we have had a 10-day dry cycle. Over the next few days, we may possibly get our next wet “return” of the pendulum, with the possibility another foot of snow at the top of Santa Fe Baldy, and severe thunderstorms with hail at lower elevations.
From the Wild: Around the pond the beginnings of spring weed growth has begun. New Mexico sunflower is germinating. SO is yellow clover and probably some cockleburs too. These plants can grow quickly and provide a thicket to conceal baby birds. The sandpiper pair are established and will find a place to nest. 2 pairs of ducks have been coming and going. It is not easy to say whether they will lay eggs and set there.
Cow stories: We are moving the cows from pasture to pasture every couple or few days. We are trying to allow time for each pasture to grow back.
The process feels strained. We would rather let the pastures grow a lot longer. But by working hard with the pastures closest to home, we are saving the further pastures, which will hopefully provide for longer grazing periods.

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Another calf was born today. Probably a heifer, but no reason to get too close yet, and make momma worry while trying to check for certain.
Momma is a cow who lost her first calf in fall 2014 when she was chased by dogs (at La Puebla pasture) as she tried to deliver the calf. She fell over in a ditch, could not right herself, and the calf did not survive. She had a neurological issue with her front feet and could not control them and get her balance.
But she was determined and as the days passed she stood up on 3 legs and then started walking gingerly around and slowly the last foot started to work.
We knew that she was ok when she started running and jumping, so we put her back with the herd. Although she is small, she holds her own in the bigger herd just fine.
From the garden: Planting out of the early zucchini continues. Hoping to complete repair of the greenhouse this week and plant out some cucumbers next
Beneficial birds: Chickens are fine, eggs are plentiful
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of May 4th, 2017

 

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday May 4th, 2017

Iceberg Lettuce from Sol Harvest
Apple Lemonade from Big B’s
Baby Turnips w/greens from Vida Verde
Beets from Sol y Tierra
Candela Radishes from Vida Verde
Grape Tomatoes from Preferred Produce

THE ART OF FERMENTATION WITH SANDOR ELLIX KATZ  Our friends at Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen passed along this event, which we thing some of our members might be interested in!

June 24th

9:00am – 12:00pm
Sandor Katz Tent
The Art of Fermentation: Come learn how simple it is to make your own kraut, kimchi, and other fermented delicacies. Learn about the healing qualities and nutritional importance of live-culture ferments, as well as their illustrious history and integral role in human cultural evolution. Empower yourself with simple techniques for fermenting these healthful foods in your home. Be part of the fermentation revival! VIP TICKETS are limited to 100 attendees. The VIP experience includes three hour hands-on workshop demonstration with Sandor Ellix Katz from 9am – 12pm. Workshop starts promptly at 9am. All VIP attendees will create their own ferment that they can take home with them in a official Fermentation Fest mason jar. Also includes general admission—a full day of vendor samplings and official Fermentation Fest tasting glass.
Sandor Ellix Katz is a fermentation revivalist. His books Wild Fermentation (2003, 2016) and the Art of Fermentation (2012), along with the hundreds of fermentation workshops he has taught around the world, have helped to catalyze a broad revival of the fermentation arts. A self-taught experimentalist who lives in rural Tennessee, the New York Times calls him “one of the unlikely rock stars of the American food scene.” Sandor is the recipient of a James Beard award and many other honors.

Beneficial’s New Pork Program
For anyone that didn’t get a chance to read about our new local pork program, you can read the full article in our blog archives HERE

Polk’s Folly

Background

Polk’s Folly is a 40-acre family farm located in the eastern foothills of the Sandia Mountains. Our family originally purchased the property in 1976 and converted it from an abandoned and derelict kids summer camp into a horse ranch. In 2015, we began planting fruit trees and working towards establishing a diversified, sustainable farm. In 2016, we forayed into raising animals for protein, bringing the land back into production after almost a decade of rest. Our vision is to provide health and happiness to our community through the production of nutritious, delicious food, delectable libations, natural healing products and holistic healing arts. We believe that food is the best medicine. But since we lack the water resources and the climatic conditions necessary to grow annual food crops, we have chosen to pursue a model based on deep rooted perennial plants (trees and drought resistant perennial pasture grasses) and animals that feed on them. In 2017, we are delighted to be able to partner with Beneficial Farms and other local food retailers to make our pastured pork more widely available.

All Natural, Pastured Pork

Happiness and health begins with the soil. Our pigs are given access to fresh pasture all throughout the growing season, and during the winter are busy rooting away in designated areas to till and fertilize the fields in preparation for spring planting. Pasture grass is supplemented with malted barley from local breweries, fruits and vegetables from local grocers, milk, and the occasional treat of bread and pastries. Besides keeping the pigs happy, this also allows us to add organic matter to the soil. Together with careful grazing management, this allows us to build fertility and water absorption capacity in the ground, increasing the ability of the land to store water and weather drought as well as the number of animals the pastures can support. The symbiotic relationship between the pigs and the pasture is part and parcel of raising happy, all natural hogs. The soil is continually fed and renewed while simultaneously providing the hogs with protein, vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients not found in store bought feed. It also gives them an opportunity to express their ‘pigginess’ in a way that is not possible in a dirt lot or a confined animal feeding operation. Consequently, the meat they produce is unparalleled in quality, taste, and nutritional value.

Heritage Breeds

The quality of the meat depends not only on the quality of the feed that the pigs receive, but also on the type of pig. We raise all heritage breed hogs. Some of our favorites are the Red Wattles, a very rare breed that maintains some more primitive traits such as the dangling appendages on the jaw line from which they got their name, a tendency to root, wallow, and play, and a dark and well marbled meat unlike anything you’ve ever tasted. For our breeding boar, we have a pure blooded Duroc, a close cousin of the Wattles and equally known for the quality of its pork, but bringing the added benefit of cross-breed vigor that helps ensure healthy and genetically sound pigs. Lastly, we have acquired several Mangalitsas, the ‘Kobe Beef of pork’. This famed breed, once thought to be extinct, hails from the Carpathian Mountains and is world renowned for their delectably deliciously crisp and light lard, and perhaps more so for their thick layer of hair that earned them the nickname ‘sheep pigs’!

Processing

Federal law requires that all meat processed for resale go to a USDA inspected facility to be slaughtered under the eye of a federal inspector. Luckily the only such facility in New Mexico is only 45 minutes away in the neighboring town of Moriarty. After slaughter, the meat is left to hang in a cooler for over a week, allowing it to tenderize, before being butchered and packaged.

On hot summer days, they need a little swimming hole (called a wallow) to keep cool. And some days so do we! Our pigs may very well live better than many people. Daily exercise, a healthy diet with lots of variety and tons of greens, lots of scratching behind the ears and back massages, we even occasionally give them beer!!

Sometimes I am not sure if our dogs think they are pigs or if the pigs think they are dogs. But one nice thing about pigs is that they are tough and fearless. Little to fear from dogs and other small predators. One of our sows will even stand down a full-grown cow!

Old Windmill Dairy Chevre
We have a variety of artisan chevre cheese from our friends at OWD. To save time creating items for each one, they are listed on the site as assorted, but if you email us your preference, we will get you the one you want.
We have:
2 Turtle Supreme
1 Chili Hot
1 Holy Chipotle
2 White Chocolate with Raspberry
2 Country Thyme
1 Sun, Fun Tomato
1 Lime & de Coconut

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Carrots: On the marketplace
Easter Egg Radishes: On the marketplace
Iceberg Lettuce: On the marketplace
Spinach: On the marketplace
Baby Bok Choy w/Flowers: On the marketplace
Desiree Potatoes: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Iceberg Lettuce: On the Marketplace
Red Kale: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Nice and spicy Thai minced chicken salad 

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Ingredients
• 1 tbsp sunflower oil
• 2 large, boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 225g/8oz each), minced up in a food processor
• flaked sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
• 2 tbsp fish sauce
• 1 lime, juice only
• 1 tsp caster, granulated or soft light brown sugar
• 3 spring onions, finely chopped
• ¼ cucumber, finely diced
• 1-2 red chillies, finely sliced, seeds removed for less heat if preferred
• 1cm/½in piece fresh root ginger, peeled and finely chopped
• ½ bunch coriander, leaves and stalks roughly chopped (about 2 tbsp)
• ½ bunch mint, leaves only, ripped
• 1 handful salted (but not dry roasted) peanuts (about 50g/1¾oz)
• 12 largish crisp iceberg lettuce leaves (cup-shaped are best)
Method
1. Drizzle the oil into a large frying pan over a high heat. Add the minced chicken with salt and pepper and cook for 4-5 minutes, stirring regularly and breaking it up as you do so, until it turns from pink to white. Cut a piece open to check it is cooked and then tip the chicken into a colander set over a bowl. Leave to cool for five minutes (so it doesn’t cause the herbs to wilt) while also allowing any excess liquid to drain off, if necessary.
2. Pour the fish sauce and lime juice into a large bowl and stir in the sugar until dissolved. Add the spring onions, cucumber, red chilli, ginger, coriander, all but a small handful of the mint leaves and the peanuts and stir together well. Tip the chicken in and toss it through. Taste it and check to see if it needs a little bit more of anything to get it just to your liking.
3. Arrange three lettuce leaves on each of four serving plates and place a couple of spoonful’s of the mixture into each one. Scatter the remaining mint leaves over to garnish and serve. The best way to eat these is to simply just pick a cup up with your hands and bite in.

ROASTED BABY BEETS 

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INGREDIENTS
30 baby beets (each 1 to 1 1/2 inches in diameter; about 5 bunches), unpeeled, all but 1 inch of tops trimmed, rinsed
4 large fresh rosemary sprigs, plus additional sprigs for garnish
1 1/2 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup olive oil
PREPARATION

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Place beets in roasting pan. Add 4 rosemary sprigs and enough water to barely cover beets. Cover pan tightly with foil. Roast beets until tender, about 50 minutes. Transfer beets to work surface. Peel while still warm; place on rimmed baking sheet. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill.)
2. Preheat oven to 350°F. Melt butter with oil in small saucepan. Pour over beets on sheet; toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake until heated through, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes. Transfer to bowl. Garnish with additional rosemary sprigs and serve.

Iceberg lettuce stuffed with veal  Iceberg lettuce stuffed with veal 

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Ingredients
1 iceberg lettuce
1 tbsp of extra virgin olive oil
200g of veal mince
1 carrot
1 onion
1 tbsp of chopped rosemary
3 tbsp of pine nuts
1 tbsp of marjoram leaves
2 cloves of garlic
1 egg
salt and pepper and mix well
seasoned chicken broth
freshly grated parmesan, to serve
Method
Blanch 6 outer leaves of an iceberg lettuce quickly in salted, simmering water so they wilt slightly. Lay them on a clean towel to cool and dry.
Heat a tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil in a pan and lightly fry 200g of veal mince with a finely diced carrot, onion, a tablespoon of chopped rosemary and 3 tablespoons of pine nuts for a few minutes until just cooked.
Place the cooked veal in a bowl and add a tablespoon of marjoram leaves, 2 minced cloves of garlic and an egg yolk. Season with salt and pepper and mix well.
Cut the iceberg leaves into 20 squares big enough to wrap small balls of the veal mixture. Place the packages in an oven dish and bake in a preheated 180C oven for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and divide among 4 bowls.
To serve
Add a ladle of seasoned chicken broth to each and sprinkle with freshly grated parmesan.
Roasted Baby Root Vegetables 

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Ingredients
• 1 bunch each baby beets, turnips, carrots, radishes and/or spring bulb onions
• Canola or olive cooking oil spray
• Olive oil, about 1 tablespoon
• 2 large cloves garlic, minced
• 1 teaspoon dried marjoram leaves
• 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
• Salt and pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 400° F. Remove the greens from the vegetables, leaving about 1/2-inch of the stems intact. (If desired, cook the greens separately.) Remove any long roots at the bottom of the vegetables. Wash and pat dry. Cut in half vertically. (The carrots and any of the vegetables that are very small can be kept whole.)
Lightly spray a large rimmed sheet pan or shallow baking dish, large enough to hold the vegetables in one layer, with cooking spray. Place the vegetables in separate areas on the pan. Drizzle with the olive oil, just enough to moisten. Add garlic to everything except the onions. Sprinkle with the herbs, salt and pepper. (I prefer marjoram and thyme on the turnips and onions, marjoram on the radishes and carrots, and just salt and pepper on the beets.) Toss each vegetable with your hands to combine with the oil and herbs. Roast until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes depending on size. Serve hot, warm or room temperature.

From the Mesa Top: May 4, 2017
Climatology 2017: Did somebody say that we were due for s wetter weather pattern by end of Month? W asked for it and we got it! The largest snowfall of this calendar year for much of the northern part of the state. Wet snow falling on dry and warm ground. Nearly a foot of snow, nearly 2 inches of water (when melted). Other than along the roads there were virtually no puddles. The ground soaked up all of the moisture.
When I predicted a return to wetter patter near the end of April, I was following what I see as a weather trend which is that “normal” in spring or fall: 2, maybe 3 weeks dry, then a return to wet… The wet side of the cycle can be brief, or extended; modest in impact, or quite vigorous.
We have had our dry cycle and then a vigorous wet “return”. Next we will watch to see if the wet side stays with us, or if we trend back to dry again for a while.
From the Wild: The sandpiper pair is settling in at the pond. There are also a large number of mourning doves with their sad song that hang around the chicken coops and feed area. The snow and soaking melt will bring wild flowers up quickly. Purple penstemen are on the way. It is a treat when we have a spring full of flowers
Cow stories: The pastures responded immediately to the deep soaking from the melting snow. It looked like the cool season grasses actually grew under the snow, as it melted, which seems impossible, but within hours of the snow melting off of the pastures, the grasses looked to be 2 to 3 inches longer.
As much concern as we have had for the growth we had seen so far in pasture/grasses, this gift of bountiful moisture from the sky should turn things dramatically toward the positive on all aspects of our pasture for the season ahead.
From the garden: In anticipation of the storm, as the first round of snowflakes fell, we were able to compost and spade 3 beds. We have an early planting of zucchini that needs to go outdoors, which is ahead of schedule. We are planning to put them out with heavy row covers and see if the forces align for us to get an early crop.
This year we are also rebuilding our greenhouse which was damaged by a late summer/fall storm in 2015, and which we could not get to last spring.
The deep soaking of the garden is likely provide us with a leg up on irrigation, even as much as a month from now.
Beneficial birds: We had a major muck-fest in the chicken yard due to the accumulation of manure since last major cleaning. It will be a lot of compost coming out of there. We need to spread what we have stockpiled, out into the garden, so make room for fresh piles in the compost yard.
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of April 27th, 2017

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Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share

for Thursday April 27th, 2017

Braising Mix from Otter Farm
Baby Bok Choy w/Flowers from Vida Verde
Spring Onions from Sol Harvest
Spinach from Vida Verde
Carrots from Irma Solis
Org Lettuce from Preferred Produce
Cucumber from Preferred Produce

Introducing Beneficial’s New Pork Program
Grab your coffee, or beer if you read this later, for another long story on local food happenings
From – Thomas S
One of the questions I ask myself on a regular base is: What does our local food say about our culture, and how do we support it? As I have been coming into my own in the CSA, I have done a lot of soul searching to figure out what my responsibilities are in running our CSA, and how best to go about this. Aside from our founding principles of bringing together like-minded families and farmers who want to support each other, the core of Community Supported Agriculture, I have realized my commitment to our food community. I have learned a lot about our local food culture. that is unique to the partners we support. I see one of the major roles Beneficial has is being a strong advocate for people that want to get into the local food world, and need support. Not every locally supportive organization is able to work with an entry level farmer, producer or rancher, as they have certain needs that might not be fulfilled. I believe that the CSA has the capacity to nurture and foster growth for a variety of farmers, ranchers and producers. We have seen this year that our support of Anthony Youth Farm over the years has developed into packaged salad mix that the COOP now carries, our support of our Harvey’s Cider means they will be in stores next season, and of course the work we do with our eggs has started a large growth for of family’s eggs.
This brings us back around to pork, and good mountain folk.
I lived for a year in the Sandia Peak area outside of Albuquerque, where I found myself at home in the mountains again. As a local brewery enthusiast, I followed the progress and launching of Ale Republic, a crowd-source funded brewing in Cedar Crest. It started out as 2 guys with a dream of brewing beer in the mountains, and grew to be a Nexis of the community, where like-minded people found a communal meeting place.
I first heard of Polk’s Folly through Ale Republics’ Facebook page, as the food cart they hosted, and the name stuck. In about Jan, I found myself at Ale at the same time Polk’s was there, so with beer in hand, I introduced myself. That is when I met Ethan, who after hearing who I was, said: “Oh, people have been telling us to get in contact with you.” As he told me what their project was about, who they were, and what they did, I started to get a gut feeling that I wanted to know more about these guys. After a great time talking with Ethan, tasting the most amazing green chile sausage I have had in my life, with a sample to take home, I left for home pretty interested.

After that, I reached out to Ethan and his brother Zach and got the dialogue going. The more we talked, the more I thought this was what our CSA was missing, our own direct connection to our pork producer. Then we started delving into the heritage breeds they specialized in, and the unique practice of pasturing their pigs on grass. One of my favorite moments was learning that Mangalitsas hogs are known as “the Kobe Beef of Pork”. I asked Zach if we grew the program, would they hire Geishas to massage the pigs and feed them beer? He replied: Ethan is a trained masseur, he does rub the pigs down and they get beer grain at least, maybe some beer!

As I have worked towards establishing our new partnership with Ethan and Zach, I have become very vested in their farm and efforts. We had a business “meeting” Friday night, where we went over some of the final marketing and core functionality pieces, also resulted in an invitation to stay the night on the farm for dinner (consisting of BBQ pork) and libations all produced on the farm. At around 5am, I was awakened by the smell of coffee, and rustlings in the kitchen. As Ethan offered some coffee to me, I looked out of the window of the house to see the pigs roaming the yard.
Pigs out the window

As we continued to talk, he told me about his newest project, a beekeeping. While walking out to see the hive, I saw a 150lb pig scratching its ear on a box, and walked up to it and started scratching him. He immediately put his full weight on my leg and started snorting in appreciation, moving his head to get both ears and anywhere else he needed a scratch. Finishing up my coffee, I took off back to Mesa Top farm and while driving out, I saw 5 pigs running across the pasture heading back to Ethan who was filling their troughs with feed. At that moment, I was doubly invested in our new partners, having witnessed every bit of what they claimed first hand.

Finally, I think the name needs a little background. Polk’s Folly refers to their family’s history, when the Robert Pollok immigrated to American in 1680, fleeing war torn Ireland. The only land available was a wretched piece of swamp land in Maryland, but that is where the first Polk farm began. Every year the rains would devastate the land, and every year Robert would rebuild, thus the locals dubbed the farm “Polk’s Folly”. Over 300 years later, I met the descendants of Robert Polk, in a small mountain town bar. Paraphrasing Zach: Is it crazy to try to farm 7000’, atop a mountain in a desert state? Are we wrong to build our farm around a food revolution, focusing on harmony with the land we tend? Why shouldn’t we be so concerned about the food our pigs eat, the lives they live, their happiness? If we are wrong, that is our folly, that’s Polk’s Folly.

Polk’s Folly

Polks Folly

Background

Polk’s Folly is a 40-acre family farm located in the eastern foothills of the Sandia Mountains. Our family originally purchased the property in 1976 and converted it from an abandoned and derelict kids summer camp into a horse ranch. In 2015, we began planting fruit trees and working towards establishing a diversified, sustainable farm. In 2016, we forayed into raising animals for protein, bringing the land back into production after almost a decade of rest. Our vision is to provide health and happiness to our community through the production of nutritious, delicious food, delectable libations, natural healing products and holistic healing arts. We believe that food is the best medicine. But since we lack the water resources and the climatic conditions necessary to grow annual food crops, we have chosen to pursue a model based on deep rooted perennial plants (trees and drought resistant perennial pasture grasses) and animals that feed on them. In 2017, we are delighted to be able to partner with Beneficial Farms and other local food retailers to make our pastured pork more widely available.

All Natural, Pastured Pork

Happiness and health begins with the soil. Our pigs are given access to fresh pasture all throughout the growing season, and during the winter are busy rooting away in designated areas to till and fertilize the fields in preparation for spring planting. Pasture grass is supplemented with malted barley from local breweries, fruits and vegetables from local grocers, milk, and the occasional treat of bread and pastries. Besides keeping the pigs happy, this also allows us to add organic matter to the soil. Together with careful grazing management, this allows us to build fertility and water absorption capacity in the ground, increasing the ability of the land to store water and weather drought as well as the number of animals the pastures can support. The symbiotic relationship between the pigs and the pasture is part and parcel of raising happy, all natural hogs. The soil is continually fed and renewed while simultaneously providing the hogs with protein, vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients not found in store bought feed. It also gives them an opportunity to express their ‘pigginess’ in a way that is not possible in a dirt lot or a confined animal feeding operation. Consequently, the meat they produce is unparalleled in quality, taste, and nutritional value.

Heritage Breeds

The quality of the meat depends not only on the quality of the feed that the pigs receive, but also on the type of pig. We raise all heritage breed hogs. Some of our favorites are the Red Wattles, a very rare breed that maintains some more primitive traits such as the dangling appendages on the jaw line from which they got their name, a tendency to root, wallow, and play, and a dark and well marbled meat unlike anything you’ve ever tasted. For our breeding boar, we have a pure blooded Duroc, a close cousin of the Wattles and equally known for the quality of its pork, but bringing the added benefit of cross-breed vigor that helps ensure healthy and genetically sound pigs. Lastly, we have acquired several Mangalitsas, the ‘Kobe Beef of pork’. This famed breed, once thought to be extinct, hails from the Carpathian Mountains and is world renowned for their delectably deliciously crisp and light lard, and perhaps more so for their thick layer of hair that earned them the nickname ‘sheep pigs’!

Processing

Federal law requires that all meat processed for resale go to a USDA inspected facility to be slaughtered under the eye of a federal inspector. Luckily the only such facility in New Mexico is only 45 minutes away in the neighboring town of Moriarty. After slaughter, the meat is left to hang in a cooler for over a week, allowing it to tenderize, before being butchered and packaged.

Ethan in pig pool

On hot summer days, they need a little swimming hole (called a wallow) to keep cool. And some days so do we! Our pigs may very well live better than many people. Daily exercise, a healthy diet with lots of variety and tons of greens, lots of scratching behind the ears and back massages, we even occasionally give them beer!!

Pigs and dog

Sometimes I am not sure if our dogs think they are pigs or if the pigs think they are dogs. But one nice thing about pigs is that they are tough and fearless. Little to fear from dogs and other small predators. One of our sows will even stand down a full-grown cow!

Pastured Piggy

Old Windmill Dairy Chevre
We have a variety of artisan chevre cheese from our friends at OWD. To save time creating items for each one, they are listed on the site as assorted, but if you email us your preference, we will get you the one you want.
We have:
2 Turtle Supreme
1 Chili Hot
1 Holy Chipotle
2 White Chocolate with Raspberry
2 Country Thyme
1 Sun, Fun Tomato
1 Lime & de Coconut

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling sometimes.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Carrots, Yaya: On the marketplace
Spinach: On the marketplace
Baby Bok Choy w/Flowers: On the marketplace
Desiree Potatoes: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Green Lettuce: On the Marketplace
Kale: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Ginger Baby Bok Choy Recipe 

baby-bok-choy-recipe
Ingredients
• 6 heads baby bok choy
• 1 1/2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
• 1 1/2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce
• 1 tablespoon mirin*
• 1/2 teaspoon raw honey
• 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
• 1 tablespoon coconut oil
• 1 pinch red pepper flakes
• 3 cloves garlic
• 1 tablespoon minced ginger
• 2 scallions
• 1 teaspoon lemon juice
• 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
Procedure
1. Remove the bottoms from the bok choy heads. Separate the leaves and cut across into small pieces, keeping stems and leaves separate.
2. Mix together the vinegar, tamari, mirin, honey, and toasted sesame oil in a bowl. Set aside.
3. Over high heat, warm the sauté pan or wok, add the coconut oil, making sure it covers the pan. Add the bok choy, red pepper flakes, scallions, garlic, and ginger. Stir fry for 30 seconds.
4. Add sauce mixture and cook for about 1 minute, until mixture thickens. Add bok choy leaves and cook for another 30 seconds.
5. Place the bok choy in a serving bowl, add a squeeze of lemon and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve immediately.
Braised Greens with Red Wine Vinegar 

recipeblog
Serves 4-6

1 medium yellow onion, sliced into thin half moon
1 clove elephant garlic (or 2-3 regular), minced
3 Tb olive oil, divided
¾ tsp sea salt, divided
1 lb braising mix (or straight kale)
3 cups water or broth
2-3 carrots, ribbons (~1 cup)
¼ tsp garlic powder
¼ cup red wine vinegar

Heat a heavy bottom large stock pot over medium heat. When pan is hot add 1 Tb oil, onion, garlic and ¼ tsp sea salt. Stir to coat the onion and sweat the onion on medium heat until soft and translucent.
Chop the braising mix into 2 inch chunks. You can pull the leaves off of the midribs or leave them intact if you want to save time. The leaves and mid ribs are small and not too fibrous right now so the choice is yours.
Add the braising mix and the 3 cups of water/broth. Stir frequently for 1-2 minutes to get all the greens wilted and wet. Cook on medium heat for 10 minutes.
Uncover and give the greens a stir. At this point they should just be peeking out from the liquid. Leave the pot uncovered and cook for 10 more minutes.
Meanwhile use a vegetable peeler to make long ribbons out of your carrots. Shoot for about 1 cup of carrot ribbons.
Add the carrots, garlic powder, red wine vinegar, ½ tsp sea salt, and 2 Tb olive oil. Stir to combine and simmer for a couple more minutes.

Spinach, cucumber and celery juice 

img_5943-001
ingredients
• 1 Large organic cucumber
• 6 stalks organic celery
• 3 cups organic baby spinach
• 1 organic lemon (freshly squeezed)
directions
Step 1
Cut cucumber and celery to fit your juicers chute.

Juice the spinach, cucumber and celery.

Strain through the strainer to remove foam.

Squeeze the juice of (1) lemon into green juice.

Drink immediately or store in an air-tight glass container (keep refrigerated).

Thai Coconut Soup with Bok Choy & Mushrooms 

thai2bcoconut2bsoup2bwith2btofu2brecipe
Ingredients:
1 tbsp coconut oil (or your choice of oil)
1 tbsp freshly minced ginger
10 oz cremimi mushrooms – thinly sliced
1 tbsp Season with Spice’s Thai BBQ Seasoning
1/2 tsp Season with Spice’s Turmeric Powder, or more to taste
2 1/2 cups vegetable broth, or water
12 oz package of firm silken tofu – cut into small cubes
1/3 cup to 1/2 cup coconut milk
Sea salt to season (I used our Sweet Ginger Sea Salt)
4-5 bunches of baby bok choy – thinly sliced

Method:
1. Heat coconut oil in a pot or large skillet, over medium fire. Add half of the minced ginger and cook until aromatic, about 30 seconds. Add in sliced mushrooms and cook for about 4 minutes. When the liquid begin to evaporate, add in our Thai BBQ Seasoning and turmeric powder. Stir to mix in.
2. Add in broth/water and tofu cubes, and bring it to a boil. Add in the remaining minced ginger. Lower heat to medium, and add in coconut milk. Stir gently to combine. Let cook for another minute. Season with our Sweet Ginger Sea Salt. Taste, and adjust any seasonings to your taste. If you like the soup to be a richer consistency, just add in a bit more of the coconut milk.
3. Remove from heat. Stir in the bok choy to lightly wilt. Serve hot or warm.

Spring Onion Subzi (Curry) 

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Ingredients:
• Spring Onions – 1 bunch
• Onion – 1
• Tomato – 2
• Green chilies – 2
• Kalonji (onion seeds) – 1/2 tsp
• Ginger garlic paste – 1 tsp
• Coriander powder – 2 tsp
• Red chili powder – 1 tsp
• Turmeric powder – 1/2 tsp
• Garam masala powder – 1 tsp
• Salt – to taste
• Oil – 1 tbsp
Instructions:
1. Wash the spring onion bunch and chop the white onion bulbs from the greens separately. Chop the white and green part finely and keep them separately.
2. Chop the onion, tomatoes and green chilies finely and keep aside.
3. Heat a pan with oil. Add kalonji and when it sizzles, add the finely chopped white part of the spring onion and sauté over high heat for 1/2 minute.
4. Reduce the flame and add the chopped onions and sauté till the onion becomes translucent.
5. Now add ginger garlic paste and sauté for a minute. Add chopped green chilies, tomato, salt and cook for 3-4 mins till the tomatoes become mushy.
6. Add chili powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder and mix well. Add 3-4 tbsp water and cook for 2 mins till the raw smell disappears.
7. Now add the chopped green part of the spring onion and mix well and let it cook for 2-3 mins till it wilts.
8. Add 1/4 cup water (approx.,), mix well, close the pan with a lid and cook for 4-5 mins till the raw smell disappears and the gravy thickens up a bit.
9. Add garam masala powder, mix well for the flavors to merge well.
10. Spring Onion curry recipe is ready.
11. Take off fire and serve hot with chapathis.

From the Mesa Top: April 27, 2017
Climatology 2017: The much-anticipated wetter weather pattern is on the way. First, we are getting buffeted with winds that create high danger of wildfire. Then the moisture will work its way in behind the departing wind
Several storms are likely to pass through this week. The NOAA meteorologists base that projection on active storms in the east Pacific and jet stream that is riding right over and through New Mexico.
It never hurts to pray for rain!
From the Wild: The egrets have moved on and ducks are hanging around at the pond. The cry of the Sandpiper can also be heard
Cow stories: The tiny calf and her mom have joined the herd and are heading out to pasture every day. So far so good! Little mini-Minnie seems to have bonded to the herd. One evening she came home with a group of cows and 10 minutes later momma came trotting along looking for her. The herd is the best protection for any calf.
The wind has put the “slows” onto pasture growth in the most exposed areas. The cool season grasses in the shaded and wind protected areas are still growing.
The ground is dusty but the grass is not burned and brown. We should see growth resume across a wider cross section of pasture if we have cooler weather and some rain.
Beneficial birds: Time to start planning the big annual cleanup, and possible re-arranging of fences and structures to accommodate more birds!
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of April 20th, 2017

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday April 20th, 2017

Chili n Hot Chevre Cheese from Old Windmill Dairy
Green Curly Kale from Sol y Tierra
Carrots from Sol y Tierra
Peanuts from Valencia , Portales NM
Vine Tomatoes from Preferred Produce
Red Bell Pepper from Preferred Produce

4/20 Update!
No, we have not legalized marijuana in NM yet, but we felt we should at least make some reference to the fact that your locally grown greens share is being delivered on April 20th.
Instead, we wanted to let you know about Blue Corn Brewery’s release of a Triple IPA this Thursday!! Beneficial has a good relationship with BCB since we supply the kitchen with salmon and their brewmaster is a CSA member. One of the unexpected perks of our work, was that we got a preview of this hop-tastic masterpiece 2 weeks ago while it still fermenting. For the hop heads in our CSA, this beer release should be worth going out to try!

CSA Recipes Needed:
We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

Member Reminder:
We love recycling!
We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.
Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!
Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.
Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!
Shares@Beneficialfarm.com
CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

Substitutions:
*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.
News and specials on the marketplace:
We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

Carrots, Yaya: On the marketplace
Desiree Potatoes: On the marketplace
Cantaloupe: On the marketplace
Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace
Red Russian Kale: On the marketplace
Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace
Cucumbers: On the Marketplace
Green Lettuce: On the Marketplace
Kale: On the Marketplace
Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

Chicken Peanut Curry 

chicken-peanut-curry-vertical-a2-1600

Ingredients
• 3 lbs boneless, skinless chicken pieces (or you can use bone-in for added flavor), cut into 1 1/2 inch wide chunks or strips
• 2/3 cup flour
• 4 Tbsp curry powder
• 2 teaspoons Kosher salt
• 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground peppercorns
• 1/3 cup olive oil
• 2 Tbsp fresh ginger, minced
• 2 Tbsp garlic, minced
• 2 serrano chili peppers, seeded, de-veined, minced
• 4 cups chicken broth
• 2/3 cup peanut butter (if using freshly ground peanuts, add 2 teaspoons of sugar)
• 1 teaspoon ground coriander seeds
• 8 green onions, chopped, greens included
• 1/3 cup each finely chopped mint and cilantro
• 3 Tbsp lime juice
1 Coat chicken pieces in seasoned flour: Rinse chicken and pat dry. In a large bowl, combine the flour, curry powder, salt and pepper. Toss the chicken pieces to coat.
2 Sauté chicken pieces: Heat oil in a large, heavy pot or Dutch oven on medium high heat. Add chicken pieces in batches, being careful to not crowd the pan. Cook 2-4 minutes per side, or until the coating sets and browns a little. Remove the chicken from the pot as it cooks and set aside in a bowl.
3 Build curry base with ginger, garlic, chili, broth, peanut butter: When the chicken has all been browned, add the ginger, garlic, chili pepper and 1/2 cup of the chicken broth to the saucepan. Cook for a minute or two, scraping the pan with a spatula and stirring to combine everything well.
Whisk in the peanut butter, and the remaining 3 1/2 cups of broth slowly, stirring continuously to maintain an even texture.
4 Add chicken to pot, simmer: Return the chicken to the pot and simmer for 15-25 minutes.
5 Serve with coriander and garnishes: Right before serving, add the ground coriander, cilantro, mint and green onions. Add salt and lime juice to taste. Serve with rice.
Crispy Kale and Chèvre Pizza 

crispy-kale-and-chevre-pizza-7
1 batch pizza dough
2 tablespoons olive oil
6 cups raw kale
1/4 teaspoon salt
pinch chilli flakes
3 oz chevregoat cheese

Oil pizza sheet well and form dough onto sheet. Heat oven to 450F. Use one tablespoon of the olive oil to coat the pizza dough.
Wash kale thoroughly and spin until very dry. Chop into bite sized pieces (think 1″ square). Toss kale with remaining olive oil and sprinkle thoroughly with salt. Spread over pizza. Drop goat cheese in little blobs all over pizza. Sprinkle with chill flakes. Transfer to the oven and bake for 5 minutes, turn and bake for another 5-8 minutes.

Homemade Trail Mix Recipe 

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Ingredients:
1 large container of organic raisins
1 small packet of organic dried cranberries (or other dried fruit of your liking — chopped apricots, pineapple, mango or dates would be good)
1 tub of salted or unsalted peanuts
1 tub of salted or unsalted sunflower seeds (or pepitas, almonds or cashews)
2 cups or more of dark chocolate chips, milk chocolate chips, carob chips or M&Ms
Optional:
2 cups or more of plain stove-popped popcorn
Instructions
Pour all the ingredients into a bowl and stir them together. Package into serving sizes or serve in the bowl.
This homemade trail mix is high in calories (which is what you want in a trail mix, right?) but if you want to reduce the calories for a healthier snack, add in the plain stove-popped popcorn and that cuts the calories per serving significantly.

Roasted Beet and Carrot Salad with Chèvre, Spring Herbs and Coffee Soil 

beetsalad1
Serves 2

8-10 beets, a mix of sizes (I used 2 large purple, 2 medium yellow, and 5 small yellow), if beet greens are attached, cut to leave about 1 inch of the stems attached.
8 baby carrots, sliced in half (delicate frond tops reserved)
2 tbsp. olive oil
Salt
1/2 cup coffee soil (see recipe below)
5 oz. soft goat cheese (chèvre)
2 french breakfast radishes, shaved thinly (may use regular radishes)
1/4 cup of tender pea shoots, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 tbsp. snipped fresh chives

Dressing:
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1 tsp. honey
Salt and fresh-ground black pepper, to taste

1. Preheat oven to 400 F. Divide beets into groups by size. Wrap each group in aluminum foil, place on a baking sheet and roast until tender when pierced with a fork (for my beets, I did 45 minutes for the small ones, 60 minutes for the medium ones, and 70 minutes for the large ones). Once cooled, use your fingers to peel the beets and discard the peels. Slice the medium and large beets into 1/2-inch thick slices.

2. Toss carrots with 2 tbsp. olive oil, sprinkle with salt and place in a small roasting pan. Roast at 400 F for about 30-35 minutes (I did it alongside the beets).

3. To make the dressing, bring balsamic vinegar to boil in a small frying pan or saucepan. Boil for about 5 minutes, until reduced to a syrupy consistency. Remove from heat. In a large bowl, whisk together reduced vinegar, honey, olive oil, salt and pepper

4. To compose each salad, sprinkle 1/4 cup of coffee soil on plate. Divide goat cheese into small pieces and arrange evenly on top of soil. Then arrange roasted beets and carrots. Place radish shavings on top of radishes (I tried to make them look like flowers). Sprinkle with pea shoots, carrot fronds and chives. Finally, drizzle each salad with half of the vinaigrette.

Coffee Soil
Adapted from Coffee Soil, Tyson Cole and Jessica Dupuy, Uchi: The Cookbook by way of Austin360.com

2 /14 oz. hazelnuts
2 1/4 oz. sugar
1/4 oz. cocoa powder
3/4 oz. finely ground decaffeinated coffee
1/2 tsp. salt
1 1/4 oz. flour
3 tbsp. melted butter

1. Preheat oven to 350 F.

2. Toast hazelnuts over medium-low heat in a frying pan until fragrant. Dump nuts onto a kitchen towel, fold towel over nuts and rub to remove skins. Once cooled, grind nuts in a food processor until fine.

3. Combine ground hazelnuts with all other ingredients except butter in a food processor and process until well combined. Dump mixture into a large bowl, pour melted butter over dry ingredients, and stir until well combined.

4. Spread mixture out onto a parchment-lined baking sheet, making a thin layer. Bake for 12 minutes. Once cooled, use a spoon to crush mixture into a powdery “soil.” Transfer to an air-tight container and store in the refrigerator.

Homemade Peanut Butter

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Serves: 15

Ingredients
2 cups roasted unsalted peanuts
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/2 teaspoons honey
2 teaspoons vegetable oil

Instructions
1. Add peanuts to the food processor and pulse until fine
2. Add salt, honey and vegetable oil and process for 3 minutes or until peanut butter is smooth
3. Store peanut butter in a glass or plastic jar and store in refrigerator for up to one month
For crunchy peanut butter: Before making the creamy peanut butter, pulse an additional 1/2 cup of peanuts until chopped into small pieces and set aside. Make the recipe then stir in peanut pieces.

Substitution Ideas
Swap out roasted, unsalted almonds, cashews or pistachios for the peanuts and follow with the instructions above.
Gratinéed Asparagus, Tomato and Chèvre Frittata 

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Serves 6 to 8, depending on appetite
Ingredients:
8 asparagus stalks
½ cup (120 mL) fresh bread crumbs
2 Tbsp + 2 tsp (40 mL) unsalted butter
½ cup (120 mL) grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
3 green onions, white and light green part, thinly sliced
9 large eggs
¾ tsp (4 mL) kosher salt
8 cherry tomatoes, seeded and cut in strips
3 oz (85 g) creamy mild chèvre, crumbled, about ⅓ cup (80 mL)
1 tsp (5 mL) minced fresh tarragon
¼ tsp (1.2 mL) coarsely ground black pepper
Instructions:
Clean and boil the asparagus until cooked but still a bit crisp. Plunge into cold water to preserve the colour and drain. Cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces but reserve 3 tips 3 inches (7.5 cm) long. Set the 3 tips aside.
In a small frying pan, sauté the bread crumbs in 1 Tbsp (15 mL) melted butter until toasted and golden. Cool and mix with the Parmigiano-Reggiano. In the same frying pan, lightly sauté the green onions and 2 tsp (10 mL) melted butter.
Preheat the broiler.
Whisk the eggs with the salt in a small bowl. Melt the remaining 1 Tbsp (15 mL) butter over medium heat in a 9- to 10-inch (23- to 25-cm) sauté or frying pan until it just bubbles. Make sure to coat the sides of the pan with butter as well as the bottom – a non-stick pan is preferable.
Turn the heat to medium-low, pour the eggs into the pan and cook for 1 minute. Evenly distribute the tomatoes, the 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces of asparagus, the chèvre, onions and tarragon over the eggs and grind on the pepper. Cover the pan with a lid and continue cooking for about 8 to 10 minutes or until the frittata has puffed slightly around the edges and there is just a glistening of liquid egg still visible in the middle.
Remove the frittata from the heat and sprinkle with the bread crumbs. Place under the broiler for no more than 2 minutes.
Decorate the middle of the frittata with the reserved 3-inch pieces of asparagus. Serve immediately from the pan or, if you are using a non-stick pan, slide the frittata onto a warm serving dish. Serve with warm slices of baguette or whole grain bread.

From the Mesa Top: April 20, 2017
Climatology 2017: We a couple of days with threatening weather, but no precipitation to speak of. If I had to guess I would look for a wetter pattern as we get closer to the end of the month.
From the Wild: a pair of snowy egrets on the reservoir. Cattle grazing in the background, OUTSIDE the fence that we built along the shore of the reservoir.

pair20of20snowy20egrets_zpsdv1v2ndi
Another exciting success in our habitat improvement program is that we have been using our extra sunshine and solar power to pump water up to a smaller natural pond and have been able to keep it full, allowing the soil banks to stay saturated. The coyote willows that crowd the bank have been spreading naturally. It will be interesting to see what the impact is of keeping the whole area wet throughout the spring
Cow stories: Minnie’s Little Mini is growing, slowly. At 3 weeks old she is now about as big as a small, new born calf. She is bright and alert, speedy and nimble. She is nibbling at the hay. She is in all ways normal except that she is a tiny little thing. We are afraid to let her out with the big kids because she could so easily get lost, on the wrong side of a fence, or something like that.
The cows have had access to pasture during the days, and then they come back for water and hay at night. Only one feeding of hay per day, and supplemental grazing. There is just not enough grass yet to send them full time to pasture.
There is a green tint all around, but not a lot of vegetative growth
Beneficial birds: The chicken house is ready for more birds! And the next batch is growing well in the brooder
Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,
The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family
Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member Message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for Distribution of April 13th, 2017

 

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share

for Thursday April 13th, 2017

Grape Tomatoes from Preferred Produce

Spring Onions from Anthony Youth Farm

Sprouted Whole Wheat Flour from Casados Farm

Cremini Mushrooms from Rahkra Coop

Half Dozen Eggs from Beneficial Farm

Cucumber from Preferred Produce

Lettuce from Preferred Produce

 

 

Update

Good afternoon! Sorry for the delay in getting the member message out on time. We are putting half a dozen of eggs in your share this week unless we hear from you that you would like something else. Our chickens continue to enjoy the warm weather, and our egg production is staying very high! With Easter this weekend, it seemed like the best time to include eggs in the share.

Let me know if you would prefer something in exchange for the eggs or other share items!

Happy Easter

Thomas

 

CSA Recipes Needed:

We are working on a cookbook for our CSA Members, and anyone getting into the world of local foods and minimal waste cooking. We are partnering with a fabulous writer who created an amazing CSA cookbook baseline that we are now working on making our own. Any personal recipes you want to share that we can include in this book, please send a copy! We want to publish an amazing cookbook that not only illustrates the necessity of low waste cooking with “weird” CSA foods, but also has a real tie to the NM members who have made their dinners based on what the land provides.

 

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick-up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons if they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. To have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which can be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Winter crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Carrots, Yaya: On the marketplace

Desiree Potatoes: On the marketplace

Cantaloupe: On the marketplace

Red Bell Peppers: On the marketplace

Baby Red Russian Kale: On the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Cucumbers: On the Marketplace

Spinach: On the Marketplace

Green Lettuce: On the Marketplace

Kale: On the Marketplace

Grape and Vine Ripe Tomatoes: On the Marketplace

 

Why sprouted wheat?

Sprouting wheat berries before milling unlocks their nutritional benefits. The result is a healthy, higher-fiber flour that gives you all the goodness of whole grains with a milder, lighter taste.

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SPROUTED WHEAT STICKY BUNS 

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These sweet and tender buns are no ordinary breakfast pastry. Their filling is lightly spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg, and their topping is a gooey, rich caramel with a touch of orange. Studded with pecans and packed with whole grains, this is a bun that’s sure to please everyone.

Dough

  • 2 cups sprouted wheat flour
  • 4 1/2 teaspoons potato flour
  • 2 tablespoons Baker’s Special Dry Milk, or nonfat dry milk
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 2 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons lukewarm water

Topping

  • 1/4 cup (4 tablespoons) butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon grated orange rind (zest), optional
  • 1/2 cup whole pecans

Filling

  • 1/4 cup (4 tablespoons) butter, softened
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • pinch of salt
  • 1/3 cup chopped pecans

Directions

  1. To make the dough: Combine all of the dough ingredients, stirring until everything comes together.
  2. Knead the dough until smooth, adding additional water if needed — the dough should be soft and supple.
  3. Cover the dough and allow it to rise for 1 to 2 hours, or until puffy, but not necessarily doubled in bulk.
  4. While the dough is rising, prepare the topping and filling.
  5. To make the topping: Set a saucepan that’s at least 4″ deep over medium heat and add the butter.
  6. Heat the butter until it’s melted, then stir in the remaining topping ingredients, except the pecans. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring constantly.
  7. Turn the heat to low and continue to boil the topping until it’s glossy and slightly thickened, 3 to 4 minutes longer.
  8. Pour the topping into a lightly greased 8″ square pan and sprinkle the pecans evenly on top.
  9. To make the filling: Combine all the ingredients except the chopped pecans and stir until blended.
  10. Beat the filling on high speed of a stand or handheld electric mixture for 3 minutes until light and fluffy.
  11. To assemble the buns: Gently deflate the dough on a lightly floured work surface. Roll or pat it into a 9″ x 12″ rectangle.
  12. Spread the filling evenly onto the dough then sprinkle on the chopped pecans, leaving a bare 1″ margin along one of the short edges.
  13. Starting with the filling-covered short edge, roll the dough into a log, pinching the edge to seal. Slice the log into 9 equal pieces.
  14. Place the buns into the prepared pan, leaving about 1/4″ to 1/2″ in between them; they won’t fill the pan completely.
  15. Cover the pan, and let the buns rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour; they should be noticeably puffy.
  16. Near the end of the rising time preheat the oven to 350°F.
  17. Bake the buns for 26 to 30 minutes, tenting them with foil towards the end if they appear to be browning too quickly. The finished buns will be a deep golden brown and the filling will be bubbling up around the edges of the pan.
  18. Remove the buns from the oven and allow them to cool in the pan for 5 minutes.
  19. Loosen the buns from the edges of the pan then carefully (the caramel is VERY hot!) turn the buns out onto a serving plate, scraping any extra topping and nuts from the pan back onto the buns.

Tips from our bakers

  • For pure cinnamon flavor, substitute an extra 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon for the nutmeg in the filling, and omit the orange in the topping.

 

 

Grape tomatoes stuffed with cream/goat cheese on a green onion stem

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Easter Breakfast Casserole 

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Ingredients

  • 1 pound bacon
  • 1/4 cup diced onion
  • 1/4 cup diced green bell pepper
  • 3 cups shredded Cheddar cheese

 

  • 8 eggs
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 (16 ounce) package frozen hash brown potatoes, thawed

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease a 7×11 inch casserole dish.
  2. Fry the bacon in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat until evenly browned, about 10 minutes. Drain on a paper towel-lined plate. Crumble.
  3. In a large bowl beat together eggs and milk. Mix in cheese, bacon, onion and green pepper. Stir in the thawed hash browns. Pour mixture into prepared casserole.
  4. Cover with aluminum foil and bake in preheated oven for 45 minutes. Uncover and bake for another 30 minutes until eggs have set.

 

SPRING ONION FRITTATA 

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Ingredients

  • 6 eggs
  • ¼ cup water or milk
  • olive oil, for the pan
  • 3-4 thin spring onions, chopped small, plus slice a few into thin vertical strips
  • ½ cup chopped asparagus tips
  • 1 garlic clove minced
  • ½ cup frozen peas, thawed
  • ¼ cup fresh mozzarella pieces
  • ¼ cup crumbled feta
  • ¼ cup chopped tarragon
  • salt & pepper
  • a few pinches of red pepper flakes

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. In a medium (8-inch) cast iron or oven-safe non-stick skillet, lightly sauté the chopped onions & asparagus pieces in a bit of olive oil, salt & pepper. Remove from the pan after just a few minutes.
  3. Blend the eggs, garlic, water, salt and pepper in a blender until combined and lightly foamy.
  4. Wipe out the skillet you used previously and coat it with a bit of olive oil. Pour in the eggs and add half of the veggies and half of the cheeses. Put the skillet in the oven, and bake for 8-10 minutes, or until the frittata begins to set but is still uncooked on top. Carefully, (without moving the skillet around too much), add the rest of the veggies and the cheeses. Continue to bake for another 10-15 minutes or until the edges of the frittata are golden brown and the eggs are set.
  5. Top with chopped tarragon, a grind of pepper and a few red pepper flakes. Let cool before slicing.

 

Pesto, Feta, and Cherry Tomato Pasta Salad 

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb. orecchiette
  • 1 c. pesto
  • 1 c. cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 c. Feta, crumbled
  • Fresh basil, for serving

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a large pot of salted boiling water, cook orecchiette according to package directions until al dente. Drain, then transfer to a large serving bowl.
  2. Add pesto and toss pasta until coated. Add tomatoes, feta, and basil and toss.

 

SPROUTED WHEAT EASY RUSTIC BREAD 

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When it comes to 100% whole-grain bread, sprouted wheat flour has a lot of appeal. It’s easy to work with; its flavor is mellow and sweet, and it produces a loaf with remarkably tender texture and a soft, moist crumb. Feel free to play around with fruits, nuts, seeds, or whatever add-ins you like. This recipe is a great place to start if you’re a newcomer to baking with sprouted wheat or to baking with yeast.

  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 tablespoons soft butter or vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 3/4 cups sprouted wheat flour
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 1 cup mixed dried fruit, nuts and/or seeds (try cranberries, walnuts, poppy or sunflower seeds, plus 2 tablespoons chia or whole flax seeds)

Directions

  1. Stir all the ingredients together until combined. Let the dough rest, covered, for 30 minutes; this gives the flour a chance to absorb most of the water, which will make the dough a bit less sticky and somewhat easier to knead.
  2. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased surface and knead, with oiled hands, for 5 minutes. Or knead using a stand mixer equipped with a dough hook for 2 to 3 minutes. Note that this is a very sticky dough; if you’re really struggling, add a bit more flour; but the less flour you add, the lighter your bread’s texture.
  3. Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl, cover, and let rise until puffy, about 1 to 2 hours.
  4. Lightly grease an 8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ loaf pan, or a baking sheet (or line the baking sheet with parchment).
  5. Place the dough on a lightly greased work surface, and shape it into a log (for the loaf pan) or oval or round (for the baking sheet).
  6. Place the dough in or on the pan, cover, and allow it to rise until it’s crowned about 1″ over the rim of the loaf pan, or has increased by about one-third for a round or oval loaf, about 1 1/2 hours.
  7. Bake the bread in a preheated 350°F oven until it’s nicely browned and hollow-sounding when thumped, about 35 to 40 minutes for the loaf pan. If you’ve made a round, the bake time may be as much as 50 minutes; if the loaf appears to be browning too quickly, tent it with aluminum foil. The finished loaf’s temperature at the center should read at least 190°F on a digital thermometer.
  8. Remove the bread from the oven, and after 5 minutes turn it out onto a rack to cool completely before slicing.
  9. Store the bread, well wrapped, for several days at room temperature; freeze for longer storage.

 

Sour Cream and Onion Dip Deviled Egg 

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Ingredients:

  • 12 extra-large hard boiled eggs
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 2 medium shallots
  • 1/2 cup thick sour cream
  • 1 small bunch chive, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup crumbled sour cream and onion potato chips (optional)

Directions:

  1. Place a skillet over medium heat. Add the oil and shallots and sauté for 5-8 minutes until soft and golden. Salt and pepper to taste, and turn the heat off.
  2. Meanwhile, peel the hard-boiled eggs. Cut them in half and remove the yolks. Place the yolks in the food processor, and lay the empty whites on a plate or serving board.
  3. Drain (or strain) the sour cream so it is as thick as possible. Place it in the food processor along with the sautéed onions. Puree until totally smooth, then stir in 2 tablespoons of fresh chopped chive. Salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Scoop the sour cream and onion dip filling into a plastic zip bag. Snip off one corner and use the bag to pipe the filling into the centers of each egg white. Garnish with chopped chive or crumbled potato chips, or both. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

 

French Toast Casserole with Brown Sugar-Walnut Crumble 

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Ingredients

Casserole: 

  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened, for the casserole dish
  • 1 loaf Italian-style bread, cut into 18 half-inch-thick slices (about 1 pound)
  • 6 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream

Brown Sugar Crumble:

  • 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 stick unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts

Directions

For the casserole: Generously butter a 3-quart casserole dish. Arrange the bread slices over the bottom of the dish in three rows of 6 slices, shingling slightly.

Whisk the eggs, granulated sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg and 1/2 teaspoon salt in large bowl until combined and smooth. Whisk in the milk and heavy cream. Pour the egg mixture evenly over the bread slices, making sure that all slices have been coated. Cover the dish and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up to 12.

Position an oven rack in the center of the oven, and preheat to 350 degrees F.

For the crumble: Toss the brown sugar, flour, cinnamon, nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon salt together in a medium bowl. Add the butter and work it in with your fingers until the mixture is crumbly with pea-sized bits of butter. Mix in the walnuts.

To assemble: Give the bread slices in the casserole dish a gentle push into the custard. Sprinkle the crumble evenly over the top.

Bake the casserole until the top is puffed and browned and a knife inserted in the center comes out clean, about 45 minutes (it will still be a little wiggly but will continue to cook a bit out of the oven); check halfway through the baking time and tent with foil if the topping is browning too quickly. Serve hot.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: April 13, 2017

We wanted to change things up this week, more pictures less words!

 

 

Minnie’s Minnie, the tiniest calf we have ever seen

Hanging out with Chuck the golden doodle

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Kezia the standard poodle, the law and order sherriff of Mesa Top Farm, checks in with Minnie and her little Minnie

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Steve was hard at work tilling up the fields!

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The moisture of the last week conditioned the soil perfectly to begin preparing for planting in a few weeks

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The deeply rutted roads after the last in our series of rains

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A local chipmunk hitches a ride back to the farm, on the farm truck

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Beneficial chickens playing in the yard

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Thank you for your support of our local farms and farm families,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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