Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of August 25th, 2016

Check out the Webstore:

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday August 25th, 2016

Golden Delicious Apples from English Orchard, AZ

Org Peaches from Colorado

Zucchini from Mesa Top Farm

Beets from Synergia Ranch

Cabbage from Owl Peak Farm

Lettuce from Owl Peak Farm

Corn from Schwebach Farm

Pumba Onions w/Greens from Owl Peak Farm

 

Lots of Fruit again!

We have 3lbs of Golden Delicious Apples from English Family Orchard in Willcox, AZ in your share this week. Additionally, we have a healthy share of peaches from Southern Colorado. These are slightly blemished fruits, but like the apricots, we got them at an incredible bargain for members. If you are feeling overwhelmed with the fruits, we suggest taking a little time to preserve them, or maybe a make up a fresh fruit pie.

Corn!

All this rain has done wonders for the Schwebach Family’s crops, a little too much in fact. The corn is maturing at a much quicker rate then they expected, as are the other crops, creating a bit of pressure to wrap up the corn and be prepared to harvest their next crop. They are bringing in a ton of corn this week, and we are having some amazing deals to pass along to members. You will have 5 ears of corn in your share this week, but we also have some marketplace specials, 12 ears for just $6! This is our big push on corn, there might be a lingering bit in the future weeks, but this week is the big harvest week!

 

Harvest Dinner

Please join us for a night of celebrating our abundant lands that provide so much for us, the stewards of the land that toil endlessly to cultivate the land, the chefs that transform every crop into a work of art, and the organizations that work tirelessly to protect our lands!

 

Celebrate New Mexico’s Harvest with the Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust

 

Albuquerque’s Premiere Farm to Fork Event

 

Albuquerque, New Mexico (August 15, 2016) –The Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust (RGALT) invites you to join us in celebrating New Mexico’s abundant harvest at our annual fundraiser event, the 2016 Harvest Dinner, on Sunday, September 11th at the historic Guitierrez Hubbell House in the South Valley from 4pm to starlight.

 

Enjoy a sumptuous feast of local foods and libations prepared by Albuquerque’s finest chefs – Chef Chris Pope of Zinc, Chef Myles Lucero of Seasons, and Chef Frans Dinkelmann. A lively auction showcasing a variety of local goods will spice up the evening.

 

The Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust’s (RGALT) mission is to protect New Mexico’s working farms, ranches, wildlife habitat and open space for all New Mexicans. We work with private landowners interested in protecting the conservation values of their land and water for future generations.  Our vision of the Middle Rio Grande valley is a landscape rich with vegetation and wildlife, water in the river and ditches, thriving farms and connected rural and urban communities. RGALT is dedicated to preserving the land and water we all cherish.

 

“RGALT’s annual Harvest Dinner is a landmark celebration that allows us to bring together our conservation partners, landowners, and community supporters to embrace and honor New Mexico’s local harvest. It is our intention to create an event in a beautiful, historic setting that exemplifies a part of New Mexico’s diverse cultural history and showcases the products of local farmers, local chefs, and other artisanal food and alcohol producers in our community.  All proceeds from the event will go to further our mission of protecting the place we all love – the Middle Rio Grande – its land and water, for future generations.”

 

The RGALT team and friends look forward to celebrating with you over dinner!

 

Purchase discounted early bird tickets now at www.rgalt.org.

If you are interested in sponsoring our fundraising dinner or a farmer’s attendance (you can request that a Beneficial Farmer attend, it would be a wonderful gesture) at our event, please contact Cecilia Rosacker at ceciliam@rgalt.org or 505-270-4421.

 

Basil Deals

We are offering a discount on Basil in Bulk, for anyone that wants to stock up for pesto making or other dishes. $12.99/lb!

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Cherokee Tomatoes: on the marketplace

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Chard: on the marketplace

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: on the marketplace

Young Potatoes: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Kale: Dino, and Curly: on the marketplace

Cucumber, marketmore, and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Patty Pan & Zucchini: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Shishito Pepper: On the marketplace

Peaches: $1/lb on the marketplace, and in your share!!!

Shallots: On the Marketplace

 

Carla’s Peach Jalapeño Jam

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Ingredients

  • 3½ lb. ripe yellow peaches
  • 1½ c. sugar
  • 1 small jalapeño chile
  • 5 strip lemon peel
  • ¼ c. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tsp. Kosher salt

Directions

  1. In large colander, toss peaches and sugar until well mixed. Set over large bowl and let stand for 30 minutes. Reserve accumulated juices for anything you’d like, for example, tea, dessert, or cocktails.
  2. In large saucepan, bring peaches, jalapeño, lemon peel and juice, and salt to a boil. Adjust heat to simmer and cook for 30 minutes.
  3. With potato masher, lightly mash fruit. Discard lemon peel. Ladle mixture into sterilized canning jars and jar properly or refrigerate for up to 3 months.

 

Cabbage and Caramelized Onion Tart

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INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium onions, cut in half root to stem, then thinly sliced across the grain
  •  Salt
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 small cabbage, shredded or chopped (about 6 cups)
  •  Freshly ground pepper
  • 4 eggs
  • ¾ cup low-fat milk
  • ½ cup, tightly packed (2 ounces) Gruyère cheese
  • 1 yeasted olive oil pie crust (1/2 recipe)

 

PREPARATION

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large, heavy nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the onions, and cook, stirring, until they begin to sizzle and soften, about three minutes. Add a generous pinch of salt and the garlic. Stir everything together, turn the heat too low, cover and cook slowly for 45 minutes, stirring often, until the onions are very soft, sweet and light brown. Meanwhile, heat the remaining olive oil over medium heat in another large skillet. Add the cabbage. Cook, stirring often, until it begins to wilt, then add salt and pepper to taste. Continue to cook for another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring often, until the cabbage is tender and fragrant. Stir in the onions, simmer together uncovered for about five minutes or until there is no longer any liquid in the pan, and remove from the heat.
  2. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Oil a 9- or 10-inch tart pan and line with the dough. Beat the eggs and milk in a bowl and season with salt (about 1/2 teaspoon) and pepper. Stir in the onions, cabbage and cheese, and combine well. Scrape into the tart pan, and place in the oven. Bake 40 to 45 minutes until the top is lightly browned.

 

Roasted Beet and Corn Salad with Tangerine Vinaigrette

520

Ingredients

Yields: 8 servings

4 red beets (and/or golden beets)
2 (8.75 ounces) cans corn kernels, drained
1/2 tablespoon molasses
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon white pepper
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns, freshly cracked using a mortar and pestle
1/2 tablespoon light corn syrup
3/4 cup grapeseed oil (or any other neutral oil)
4 tangerines (or any fragrant citrus such as Meyer lemons)
1/3 cup lemon juice, freshly squeezed
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1-1/2 tablespoons horseradish mustard
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 cloves pickled garlic, finely minced
1-1/2 tablespoons fresh dill, + extra for garnish

Directions

For the tangerine-infused oil:

Zest and squeeze the tangerines. Finely minced the zest. Reserve the juice and about a teaspoon of zest for the vinaigrette.

In a small saucepan, heat the oil with the cracked black peppercorns and the tangerine zest over medium-low (do not reach a boil) and cook for about 5 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely.

Strain the oil through a fine mesh sieve (or a double-layered cheese cloth) and discard all the pepper solids and zest.

For the roasted beets:

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Wash the beets. Scrub them under tap water. Remember to trim off a little piece from the ends of the root. Cut into thirds, horizontally. No need to peel the beets. Once they are roasted, the peels will rub right off.

Place in a large bowl. Drizzle with about 2-3 tablespoons of tangerine-infused oil. Season with kosher salt and pepper. Toss well. Wrap each beet (3 pieces) in aluminum foil. Place the 4 aluminum wrappers on a baking sheet.

Roast for about 50-55 minutes. Let the beets cool completely in the aluminum wrappers for about an hour and a half. Wipe the skins off using paper towels.

Peel and dice the beets into 1-inch cubes. Chill in the refrigerator until you’re ready to serve.

For the tangerine vinaigrette:

In a bowl, dissolve the sugar in the lemon juice. Add the mustard. Set aside.

Using a strainer, remove the pulp of the tangerine juice. Place the tangerine juice in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, then immediately decrease the heat to a gentle simmer for a little less than 5 minutes. Add the finely chopped tangerine zest. The liquid should reduce to about a tablespoon of tangerine juice. Remove from the heat. Add salt and immediately emulsify the vinaigrette with the remaining tangerine-infused oil while the juice is still hot. Add the mustard / lemon juice mixture. Add the pickled garlic. Finish with white pepper.

Assembly time:

Remove the diced beets from the refrigerator 15 minutes before serving to bring them back to room temperature.

In a large bowl, combine the diced beets and corn kernels. Drizzle with tangerine vinaigrette. Toss well. Garnish with dill.

PEACH PIE BISCUIT BOMBS

peach-pie-biscuit-bombs-edited-square

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 package refrigerated Immaculate Flaky Biscuits (or homemade biscuit dough)
  • 1 cup sliced fresh peaches (1″ pieces)
  • 3-4 ounces soft Brie cheese
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon honey (optional)
  • 3 tablespoons butter

 

Directions

  • Preheat the oven to 375F.
  • Split the biscuits in half. Place 3-4 pieces of peach in the center of the bottom half of each biscuit. Add a small spoonful of the Brie (about a teaspoon). the sprinkle them all with brown sugar and cinnamon. Drizzle with a little honey (if you are using it).
  • Place the top back on each biscuit and gently press the edges down to lightly seal and close. Take each one in your hand and gently form into balls so the biscuit is wrapped all the way around the filling. Place them about 2″ apart on an ungreased baking sheet.
  • Put the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Melt it and then let it snap and crackle in the pan until it smells nutty. Remove from the heat. Brush each bomb with the browned butter, making sure to get the browned bits from the bottom of the pan.
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes. the tops will be golden.
  • Brush the pie bombs with the brown butter again after baking and serve warm.

 

Ground Turkey Lettuce Wraps

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Ingredients

  • 1 small onion, diced (approx. 1 cup)
  • 1 medium (196 grams) zucchini, diced
  • 3 ounces (150 grams) mushrooms (about 8-10 medium), diced
  • 6 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 1-pound lean ground turkey
  • 1/2 cup tomato sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder (or Tex-Mex spice mix)
  • 24 leaves butter lettuce
  • 8 tablespoons sour cream

Directions

Heat large sauté pan over medium heat. Add oil, onion, mushrooms and zucchini to pan and cook 3-4 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 30 more seconds.

Add ground turkey and increase heat to medium-high. Cook until no longer pink, about 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally to break up the meat.

Add tomato sauce, sugar, chili powder and salt to turkey, and stir to combine.

Remove from stove. To serve, spoon 1/4 cup turkey mixture onto one lettuce leaf. Top each wrap with 1 teaspoon of sour cream, and enjoy.

 

Golden Delicious Apple and Cheddar Turnovers with Dried Cranberries

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Ingredients

SERVINGS: MAKES 8

  • 2 medium Golden Delicious apples, peeled, halved, cored, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 2 1/2 cups)
  • 1 1/2 cups (loosely packed) coarsely grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup sweetened dried cranberries
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 17.3-ounce package frozen puff pastry (2 sheets), thawed
  • 1 large egg, beaten with 1 teaspoon water to blend (for glaze)
  • Sugar

Preparation

  • Toss first 6 ingredients in medium bowl to blend. DO AHEAD Can be made 2 hours ahead. Cover and chill.
  • Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven; preheat to 400°F. Line 2 large rimmed baking sheets with parchment. Roll out 1 puff pastry sheet on lightly floured surface to 11-inch square. Using 5- to 5 1/2-inch plate or bowl as template, cut out 4 rounds from pastry. Transfer pastry rounds to 1 baking sheet, spacing apart. Repeat with second pastry sheet, placing rounds on second baking sheet. Spoon filling onto half of each pastry round, dividing all of filling among rounds. Brush edges of pastry lightly with some of egg glaze. Fold plain pastry half over filling; press on edges to seal and enclose filling completely, then press tines of fork along pastry edge to create tight seal. Using tip of small sharp knife, cut two 1/2-inch-long slits in top of crust on each turnover. Brush tops with egg glaze, then sprinkle with sugar.
  • Bake turnovers until crusts are puffed and golden and juices are bubbling through slits in crusts, about 25 minutes. Carefully run metal spatula under turnovers to loosen and transfer to racks to cool slightly. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: August 25th, 2016

Climatology 2016:  The theatre of the sky continues to impress.  The rains have been nicely spaced. Mostly the rain comes in evening hours.  Rainfall has generally been slow and soaking.  There has been plenty of sun in the day time, not a lot of wind, and moderate temperatures.  The pastures have responded with rich and rapid growth.

One rarity is that there are weeds sprouting in the pine and juniper needles under the trees. That does not happen most years

The moderate temperatures during day, and the cooling effects or rain every night, and the regular frontal passages are creating a distinctly fall feel.  Night time temps at mesa top have fallen below 50 degrees already, at least 2 weeks ahead of when this would be expected.

The fruits from the valleys of New Mexico are also coming in 2 to 3 weeks early.  It is as if the climate fast forwarded: just as summer heat came early, so now an early, cool fall.  Does this suggest an early winter with snow in November?  Or a long easy comfortable fall…

From the Wild:  Bird species are on the increase.  A great blue heron appeared in one of the smaller ponds.  Humming birds buzz about enjoying all kinds of flowers.  A Mountain bluebird appeared.  The swallows are raising their second clutch of eggs for the season, which is a sign of favorable conditions. There were about 2 dozen ducks on the reservoir last weekend.

Cow stories:  The cows on the open pasture are showing their grassland management skills.  For several weeks they avoided the far western sections of the pasture, totaling about 80 acres, until the east end was fairly well grazed.  This resulted in a fairly rich stand there, so they head over and cleaned up for 2 or 3 days.  During that time the rains kicked some more pasture growth into gear.  And the cows headed up to the north end of the pasture, which also had been left to grow.  Soon when they return to Center, there will have been a fresh growth spurt put on there as well.

Our pastures are not big and neither is our herd. It does seem though that the cows understand the country that supports them, and instinctively move around it in what looks like an organized way.

There is enough water in the smaller water holes that the total distances that they have to move between food and water are as small as they can be for the far flung pastures.  Sometimes when the only water is at home, they walk as much as 2.5, miles from far edge of pasture to get to water.  Now the walk is no more than ½ mile.

It is nice when the conditions on the ground make the cows and the farmer’s lives easier.

Beneficial birds   Amazing how quickly the meat birds grow.  Their diet of organic grains, plenty of alfalfa and straw, and also whole wheat are going to result in a very tasty finish

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of August 18th, 2016

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday August 18th, 2016

Chard from Owl Peak Farm

Grapes from Chispas Farm

Salad Mix from Mesa Top Farm

Cantaloupe from Freshies NM

Poblano and Padron Peppers from Owl Peak and Sol y Tierra

Green Onions from Sol y Tierra

 

 

Lots of Fruit again!

We have grapes in the share this week!! They are small, a little tart, and tasted amazing, bringing an exciting new fruit to our local selection that we rarely see! On top of that, not literally because we would then have grape juice, we have some awesome cantaloupes! From Freshies, Org Certified, we have some big melons in the share this week, about 5lbs! It does make for a leaner share because of their size, but we haven’t had any melons all summer. Our farmers are doing an amazing job this season, and we are very grateful for the new relationships we have formed over this summer, welcoming Chispas, Owl Peak, Vida Verde and Silver Leaf Farms to our CSA!

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I am sorry for not getting a full member message out last week, and for the delays at SFP and ST John’s. I was traveling, and experienced car trouble in CO, which interfered with our normal schedule. – Thomas

 

Harvest Dinner

We are now coming up on Autumn, and I have yet to see my vision of a Beneficial Farm dinner come to fruition. It will happen one day, we might be able to do one this fall at our farm, we just need to wait and see.

We are however working on a benefit dinner in the mean time! As we must crawl before we can run, we are supporting and collaborating with 3 amazing chefs in Albuquerque for the Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust Harvest Dinner. Please join us for a night of celebrating our abundant lands that provide so much for us, the stewards of the land that toil endlessly to cultivate the land, the chefs that transform every crop into a work of art, and the organizations that work tirelessly to protect our lands!

 

Celebrate New Mexico’s Harvest with the Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust

 

Albuquerque’s Premiere Farm to Fork Event

 

Albuquerque, New Mexico (August 15, 2016) –The Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust (RGALT) invites you to join us in celebrating New Mexico’s abundant harvest at our annual fundraiser event, the 2016 Harvest Dinner, on Sunday, September 11th at the historic Guitierrez Hubbell House in the South Valley from 4pm to starlight.

 

Enjoy a sumptuous feast of local foods and libations prepared by Albuquerque’s finest chefs – Chef Chris Pope of Zinc, Chef Myles Lucero of Seasons, and Chef Frans Dinkelmann. A lively auction showcasing a variety of local goods will spice up the evening.

 

The Rio Grande Agricultural Land Trust’s (RGALT) mission is to protect New Mexico’s working farms, ranches, wildlife habitat and open space for all New Mexicans. We work with private landowners interested in protecting the conservation values of their land and water for future generations.  Our vision of the Middle Rio Grande valley is a landscape rich with vegetation and wildlife, water in the river and ditches, thriving farms and connected rural and urban communities. RGALT is dedicated to preserving the land and water we all cherish.

 

“RGALT’s annual Harvest Dinner is a landmark celebration that allows us to bring together our conservation partners, landowners, and community supporters to embrace and honor New Mexico’s local harvest. It is our intention to create an event in a beautiful, historic setting that exemplifies a part of New Mexico’s diverse cultural history and showcases the products of local farmers, local chefs, and other artisanal food and alcohol producers in our community.  All proceeds from the event will go to further our mission of protecting the place we all love – the Middle Rio Grande – its land and water, for future generations.”

 

The RGALT team and friends look forward to celebrating with you over dinner!

 

Purchase discounted early bird tickets now at http://www.rgalt.org.

If you are interested in sponsoring our fundraising dinner or a farmer’s attendance (you can request that a Beneficial Farmer attend, it would be a wonderful gesture) at our event, please contact Cecilia Rosacker at ceciliam@rgalt.org or 505-270-4421.

 

Basil Deals

We are offering a discount on Basil in Bulk, for anyone that wants to stock up for pesto making or other dishes. $12.99/lb!

pesto_genovese1

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Grapes: In your share and on the marketplace

Salad Mix: on the marketplace

Padron Peppers: on the marketplace

Cherokee Tomatoes: on the marketplace

Green Beans: on the marketplace

Green Chili: on the marketplace

Luque Meat Sauces are also returning to the Marketplace!

Chard: on the marketplace

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: on the marketplace

Young Potatoes: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Gold Nugget Cherry Tomatoes: on the marketplace

Kale, Dino, Red Russian and Curly: on the marketplace

Cucumber, marketmore, Armenian and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Patty Pan & Zucchini: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

 

Stuffed Poblano Peppers

stuffed-poblano-peppers

Prep and Cool time 25 mins

Cook time 20 mins

Total time 45 mins

 

Author: Vered DeLeeuw

Yield: 4 peppers

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil for the pan
  • 4 medium poblano peppers (1 lbs. total weight w/ refuse, 12 oz. cleaned )
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 medium tomatoes, diced (10 oz.)
  • ½ medium onion, diced (4 oz.)
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 cups cooked chicken breast, shredded (10 oz.)
  • 1 cup part skim mozzarella, shredded (4 oz.)
  • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • ½ cup cheddar, shredded (2 oz.)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line a large baking sheet with foil and brush it with a little olive oil.
  2. Rinse and dry the poblanos. Cut a thin slice off the tops and remove the core and seeds. Cut a slit down the side of each pepper. Set aside.
  3. Heat the olive oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the tomatoes, onion, garlic, oregano, cumin and salt. Cook, stirring often, until liquids have evaporated, about 7 minutes. Off heat, stir in the chicken, the mozzarella and the cilantro, mixing well.
  4. Divide the filling among the peppers, adding it from the top and pressing on it to fill the entire pepper. Place the stuffed peppers on the prepared baking sheet. Bake 20 minutes, until the poblanos are soft and charred in places (the smell will be amazing!).
  5. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and switch the oven to broil. Top the peppers with the cheddar cheese and broil just until the cheese is melted, about 2 minutes. Allow to rest 5 minutes before serving.

Summer Corn Montadito with Padrón Peppers and Shaved Manchego

corn_padrons_brett_emerson_0

Serves 4 to 6

INGREDIENTS

1 sweet baguette
¾ cup olive oil
Salt
2 ears corn, shucked
1 tablespoon butter
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 chopped teaspoon rosemary
½ teaspoon smoked paprika
20 to 25 padrón peppers (one or two per toast, depending on size)
½ cup shaved Manchego cheese

PREPARATION

  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Slice the baguette on a slight angle into ¼-inch-thick by 2-inch slices. Lay the toasts on a cookie sheet. Use a pastry brush to dab a little of the olive oil on top of each toast. Season lightly with salt and place pan in oven. Bake until toasts are golden brown and crisp. Let cool.
  2. Use a knife to cut the kernels off of the cobs. You should end up with 2 to 3 cups of kernels. Set aside. Use the back of the knife to scrape the corn “milk” from each cob into a bowl. Set aside.
  3. Heat a large sauté pan over high heat. When hot, add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Sauté the corn until lightly caramelized, about 2 to 3 minutes. Season with salt and set aside.
  4. Heat a small pot or pan over medium low heat. Melt the butter, then add the garlic. Cook for a few minutes, until the garlic is fragrant and lightly cooked. Add the rosemary and pimentón dulce and cook for another minute. Add the corn milk, season with salt, and cook for 5 more minutes. You will end up with a corn mush. Combine the corn kernels with the corn mush. Let cool to room temperature.
  5. Heat a sauté pan over high heat. Add about ½ cup olive oil. When the oil is nearly smoking, add half the padrón peppers. Sauté until blistered and slightly browned. Transfer to a plate lined with paper towels. Season lightly with salt. Repeat with the remaining peppers.
  6. To assemble the montaditos, spread one heaping tablespoon of corn mixture on each toast and sprinkle with salt. Top with shaved Manchego, then a padrón pepper or two.

Grape, Toasted Almond, and Sweet-Onion Salad

grape-salad-su-1932453-x

Ingredients

3/4 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon plus 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

5 tablespoons roasted almond oil

1 package (12 oz.) salad mix with sturdy greens, especially radicchio

1 sweet onion such as Walla Walla, peeled and cut into half-moons

2 cups seedless red grapes, cut in half

1 cup toasted sliced almonds

Preparation

In a bowl, whisk salt, lemon juice, and oil. Toss with remaining ingredients.

 

Melon Ball Salad with Mint and Prosciutto

melon-balls-and-prosciutto-3-800

Method:

  1. Cut your melon in half and scoop out the seeds.
  2. With a melon-baller, ball your melon halves, until you can ball them no longer. (alternately, you can just cut cubes … if you’d like … the balls are just to have a different kind of shape).
  3. Mix together your melon, prosciutto, olive oil, mint and salt and pepper.
  4. Serve!

Tamagoyaki with Green Onions Recipe

img_9841-700x466

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 3 green onions (chopped)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp soy sauce
  • 1/4 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp oil

Instructions

  1. Mix eggs, salt, soy sauce and Mirin (or sugar) in a bowl. Mix in green onions.
  2. Heat a pan at medium high temperature and add oil. (Tamagoyaki pan or a round 8-9 inch non-stick pan)
  3. Pour a thin layer of egg mixture in the pan, tilting to cover the bottom of the pan. After the thin egg has set a little, gently roll into a log. Start to roll when the bottom of the egg has set and there is still liquid on top. If you let the egg cook too much, it will not stick as you roll the log. Now you have a log at one end of the pan. You can leave it there or move it to the other end. Pour some more egg mixture to again cover the bottom of the pan. After the new layer has set, roll the log back onto the cooked thin egg and roll to the other end of the pan.
  4. Repeat adding egg to the pan and rolling until the egg is used up.

  1. Remove from the pan and cool for 3-4 minutes.
  2. Trim the ends of the log off and then slice the log into 1/2″ pieces.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: August 18th, 2016

Climatology 2016:  The monsoon continues to deliver.  At Mesa Top we had a few days/nights in succession with rain over the weekend.  The total rainfall was not enormous, but the timing, intensity, and frequency kicked more pasture growth into gear.

The rains are at rest now with lots of sun, and a promise of more precipitation later in the week.

The monsoon weather pattern that has been established for the last couple of weeks is also being enhanced by spring-like cold fronts, which sweep down the front range and then back westward across the state, running into the warm, moist air streaming up from Mexico.  This scenario creates very powerful storms, often with hail.

Sunday at Mesa Top we had one of the classic cold enhanced cloudbursts where we sit under the edge of a cloud, and can see blue sky on 2 or 3 sides, while it pours in a small area

The theatre of the sky is a spectacle at last.

From the Wild:  Mosquito invasion! No creature loves the rainy season at more than the opportunistic mosquito.  No Zika, but lots of blood loss to the voracious biters.

The reservoir at mesa top is about half full and already 2 pairs of ducks have returned.  If we could keep water in there, at about the current level, and build shore habitat brush piles that would help also provide cover for returning vegetation, it is very likely that we would have duck n the pond all season and ducklings along with.

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Cow stories:  Cows are out on a large pasture area where the grass is at last growing fast enough that they are feasting on greenery and not mowing the grass down to nothing in the process.

They move across the pasture, eating steadily.  They are not in such luxurious conditions that they can eat themselves full in a small radius and then sit and wait for their rumens to do the digesting.  They graze steadily for several hours and then sit and chew their cuds.

Everyone looks full and their coats are shiny…

Beneficial birds   Repeat from last week only more so:  the meat chicks are growing quickly as evidenced by their ravenous appetites.  It is interesting to observe how they are not concerned at all by the noise and chill of rain in the day time but if it comes at night they are very easily disturbed

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of August 4th, 2016

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday August 4th, 2016

Armenian Cucumbers from Sol y Tierra

Green Chili, Mild from Sol y Tierra

Beets from Synergia Ranch

Carrots from Frisco Farm

Bell Peppers from Owl Peak Farm

Salad Mix from Mesa Top Farm

Basil from Chispas Farm

Young Potatoes from Jubilee Farm

 

Flowers!

We were talking with the gals at Chispas Farm, in the South Valley of ABQ last week, and they said they were looking for some families that wanted local flower bouquets to go with their farm fresh produce. This seemed like a cool idea to try out, and bring even more color to the bountiful locally grown selection we have this week. The bouquets will be a mix of of Zinnias, Calendula, Celosia, Salvia and Black Eyed Susan’s. Seeing as I am not a flower expert, I had to pull some images together to see what the bouquet will include, but here is Marjory with some of the Black Eyed Susan’s in the field!

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Apricots

We are working on what tentatively might be a really cool new connection to an orchard in Paonia, CO. If things go well, we will get a smaller initial order of apricots this week to check out, which are listed on the marketplace. If all goes well, we will have a large share for members next week, and some amazing deals.

 

Green Chili

Many of our members might be unfamiliar with how to prepare green chili, but don’t feel overwhelmed, its very simple. We have included a variety of methods to roast chili in your kitchen or BBQ, to make it as easy as possible. See the recipe section!

Basil Deals

We are offering a discount on Basil in Bulk, for anyone that wants to stock up for pesto making or other dishes. $12.99/lb!

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Baja Garlic braids: Last week on the marketplace, $2 off, $6.99 ea

Wild Flower Honey is back on the marketplace!

Chard: on the marketplace

Leeks: on the marketplace

Basil, 4oz and 1lb deals: In your share and on the marketplace

Young Potatoes: In your share and on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Gold Nugget Cherry Tomatoes: on the marketplace

Apricots: on the marketplace

Fava Beans: on the marketplace

Kale, Dino: on the marketplace

Cucumber, marketmore and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Patty Pan, Mexican Grey & Zucchini: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

 

How to Roast and Freeze Green Chiles

chili

What You Need

Ingredients
Green chiles

Equipment
Towel for drying
Oven broiler
Baking sheet(s)
Aluminum foil
Tongs
Paper bag, food-safe plastic bag, or heat-safe covered bowl
Freezer bag(s) or shallow, freezer-safe container(s)
Cutting board (optional)
Knife (optional)
Spoon (optional)
Gloves to protect your hands (optional)

roasted chili

Instructions

  1. Select chiles: Choose fresh chiles that are heavy, smooth, and crisp. Straight and flat chiles, as opposed to curled ones, roast more evenly. Plan to roast the chiles within a few days of picking or purchasing them.
  2. Preheat the broiler: Position a rack 4 to 6 inches below the heating element of your broiler and preheat to high or 400° to 450°F.
  3. Wash and dry the chiles: Rinse the chiles and dry them with a towel.
  4. Place the chiles on a baking sheet: Arrange the chiles in a single layer on an aluminum foil-lined baking sheet(s).
  5. Roast the chiles on one side: Place the chiles under the broiler and roast until the skin is charred and blistered, about 3 to 5 minutes. Avoid completely blackening the chiles; you’re looking for them to be about 60% to 70% charred.
  6. Turn them over and roast the other side: Using tongs, flip the chiles over and broil on the other side until the skin is charred and blistered, about 3 to 5 minutes. Again, avoid completely blackening the chiles; you’re looking for them to be about 60% to 70% charred.
  7. Steam the peppers to loosen the peel: Remove the chiles from the broiler and place them in a paper bag, food-safe plastic bag, or heat-safe bowl. Close the bag or cover the bowl, and let stand for 10 to 15 minutes. The steam will help loosen the peel from the chiles.
  8. Peel, seed, chop (optional): The chiles may be peeled and seeded prior to freezing or later, as needed. You may wish to wear gloves to protect your hands, especially if you are processing a large quantity of chiles. To peel, pull the skin off the chile; it should come off fairly easily, but you can use a knife to cut away any stubborn bits. Seeds and membranes are most easily scraped out with a spoon. If you want, you can also chop the chiles into smaller pieces.
  9. Cool the chiles: Chiles should be completely cool before freezing them. For food safety, whole chiles can be cooled at room temperature for up to 2 hours after roasting them, or refrigerated for up to 3 days. Seeded or chopped chiles are generally cool enough by the time you finish processing them.
  10. Place the chiles in freezer containers: Use plastic freezer bags or shallow containers, which help prevent freezer burn. Arrange whole chiles in a single, flat layer to ensure even freezing and to prevent them from sticking together. If using bags, press as much air out as possible. Alternatively, you can freeze the chiles in a single layer on a tray, then transfer them to a container once frozen solid. Chopped chiles may be frozen in ice cube trays and then transferred to a container.
  11. Freeze for up to a year. Store the chiles in the freezer for up to a year and thaw in the refrigerator before using.

Recipe Notes – Alternative Roasting Methods:

  • Outdoor grill: Roast chiles directly on the grill, watching them closely and turning over as needed.
  • Electric or gas burner: Cover the burner with wire mesh and roast chiles on top, turning over as needed.
  • Cast iron skillet: Roast chiles in a skillet over medium-high heat, turning over as needed.
  • Open flame: Holding a chile pepper with tongs, carefully char it over an open gas flame or using a culinary torch.

 

Armenian Cucumber Salad

armenian salad

serves 4 as a side dish

1/2 cup cider vinegar

1/4 cup water

1T sugar

1 small clove of garlic, crushed

healthy pinch of salt

1 Armenian cucumber, thinly sliced, about 2 cups

1/4 cup thinly sliced red pepper

2T finely diced red onion

2T finely diced yellow pepper

1 tsp dried dill weed

1/2 tsp black mustard seeds (optional)

Combine cider vinegar, water, sugar and garlic in a small sauce pan and bring to a boil. Stir and remove from the heat when the sugar is fully dissolved. Add a pinch of salt and let cool.

Meanwhile, toss all the remaining ingredients together in a medium sized bowl. When the dressing is cool, pour over the vegetables; you may not want to use all the dressing if you prefer a drier salad. Toss and serve right away. Also, since the salad improves with sitting, it’s fine to do this up to several hours ahead of time.

Alternatively, carefully lay out the cucumber slices on four white plates. Sprinkle on the red and yellow peppers and the red onion. Follow with the dried dill and black mustard seed. When dressing is cool, drizzle over the vegetables and serve.

Baby Potatoes and Mushrooms in Creamy Sauce

baby-potatoes-and-mushrooms-in-creamy-sauce-2-560x370

2 lb. baby potatoes (red, yellow, fingerling)

16 oz. (1 lb.) whole small button mushrooms or sliced large size mushrooms

8 -10 garlic cloves minced or crushed

1 shallot minced (optional)

1 cup heavy whipping cream*

3/4 cup sour cream *

2 tbs.butter

2 tbs.oil salt to taste *

You can sub in crème fraiche

Directions:

Place potatoes in a pot covered with water.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat and season with salt.

Cook until potatoes are fork tender ready.

Drain the water, place the pot with potatoes on medium heat and let all the liquid evaporate. Just few minutes.

In a large sauté pan/frying pan/skillet heat oil with butter on medium -high heat.

Throw in mushrooms and shallots.

Sauté until liquid is absorbed.

Mix in garlic. Cook for 1-2 minutes stirring.

Throw in cooked potatoes and cook for few minutes stirring occasionally.

Combine heavy cream and sour cream.

Stir in mixed creams to potatoes. Season with salt.

Cook in sauce for about 1 minute.

Garnish with finely chopped dill, parsley or chives. –

 

TRIPLE BEET SALAD RECIPE WITH BASIL AND OLIVE OIL

neet-salad-2

PREP TIME

20 mins

TOTAL TIME

20 mins

Serves: about six servings

INGREDIENTS

  • 1½ lbs mixed beets, (Chioggia, golden, white, red etc., peeled and diced)
  • 2 cups chopped mixed basil , (Violetta, Genovese, Cinnamon etc.)
  • 2 cloves garlic, (minced)
  • 3 tbsp unrefined extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tsp raw apple cider vinegar

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Steam the beets over rapidly boiling water until they become tender, about five minutes or so. If using multiple varieties, note that the red beets will stain the other varieties so you may wish to steam them separately.
  2. Once tender, immediately plunge the steamed beets into a bowl of ice water, allowing them to chill until completely cool.
  3. Drain the beets, patting them or spinning them dry as necessary.
  4. Combine the drained beets with chopped basil, minced garlic.
  5. Dress with vinegar and olive oil.
  6. Serve cold.

 

STIR-FRIED THAI CHICKEN WITH PEPPERS

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PREP TIME

10 mins

COOK TIME

10 mins

TOTAL TIME

20 mins

 

Serves: 2-3

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 boneless chicken breast, cut into thin strips
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 2 teaspoons rice wine
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil or other flavorless oil, divided
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into thin strips
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 4 chopped Thai chilies
  • 1½ tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1½ teaspoon sweet soy sauce
  • ½ teaspoon organic sugar
  • 20 Thai basil leaves or mint leaves
  • ⅓ cup chicken stock
  • Steamed brown rice, for serving

DIRECTIONS

  1. Mix chicken strips with cornstarch and rice wine.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a wok or large skillet. Add red bell pepper and stir-fry until it just loses its rawness, about 1 minute. Remove to a bowl.
  3. Heat remaining tablespoon of oil in wok. Add garlic and chilies and stir-fry until fragrant, about one minute.
  4. Add chicken and stir-fry until no longer pink.
  5. Add fish sauce, sweet soy sauce, and sugar. Toss well with chicken.
  6. Add basil leaves, stir-fried red bell pepper, and stock. Bring to a boil and give it a quick stir.
  7. Serve over steamed brown rice.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: August 4th, 2016

Climatology 2016:  Now there is a real monsoon moisture settling in over the state.  The weather is becoming cooler by day and warmer at night.  The air is getting more damp and almost muggy, at least by Southwest standards

Over the next few days most of the state, except far Southeast and northwest corners are expected to receive rain.  Places that have had some rain already will tend toward flash flooding.

From the Wild:  the scavengers:  turkey buzzards, ravens and crows, and coyotes continue to live well.  Lots to feast on.  There are also a wider variety of bird species around the farm: Woodpeckers, swallows, hummingbirds, mountain bluebirds, clark’s Jays, and mourning doves to name a few.

Cow stories:  Nothing much new from the bovine world.  The range herd is working hard to find grass, and walking a long way to get to water.  These are working cows, not a lazy one among them.

Except Pinky and her calf, who are living the easy life lounging around the coral, eating lots of hay, and getting “treats” to come to the milking stanchion every day for health check and milking.

Beneficial birds   the chicks are growing quickly as evidenced by their ravenous appetites.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

 

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of July 28th, 2016

Check out the Webstore

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for

Thursday July 28th, 2016

Patty Pan Squash from Mesa Top Farm

Garlic from Allicin’s Farm

Lettuce from Owl Peak Farm

Red Onions from Vida Verde

Peaches from Freshies, Alcalde, NM

Curly Kale from Owl Peak Farm

Leeks from Jose Luis, South Valley ABQ

 

Peaches!

We have a large share of local peaches this week from Freshies, a certified Organic farm in Alcalde, NM. They are small peaches, and we are getting a bargain because of their size, so we are filling our shares up with them! If anyone wants to buys some peaches in bulk, email us!

Summer Squash

It is that time of year again; Mesa Top has zucchini coming out of our ear! We are going to try and not overload member on too much zucchini, and also mix it up when we can with other summer squash. Colleen and Kim harvested about almost 500lbs of zucchini this week, and this is only the 3rd week of the crops flourishing! If members get too overwhelmed on zukes, email us to requests a sub, but this is definitely the season for squash. When in doubt, fire up the grill, a little EVOO, soy sauce and balsamic vinegar, and you can make zucchini the highlight of the meal!

New Cheese Producer – Coonridge

We have gotten some very positive response from a member that tried out the Feta so far, that it was very garlicy and the jar really goes a long way. Members that try the other varieties, please let us know what you think, we will help base what we carry on the best responses!

Member Recruitment, Member Appreciation, Summer Deal…

Ah, the big questions of any business! How do we find new members, show our current members the appreciation they deserve for their support, and also promote the awesome deals our summer’s harvests provide us? Truth be told, it’s not my favorite side of the business, it takes a certain personality to excel in marketing. In the coming weeks, we will finally get a few efforts off the ground with some help! Our website has been redesigned, gone will be our ’90 style site, and we will be replacing it with a more up to date website. We are also going to start bi-weekly promotions for members, accompanied by deals from other local businesses. We will have incentive for referring a friend, discounts on marketplace orders and even Salmon discounts! With our new approach, you will also see other similar local business’s special deal as well in our emails.

What ideas do you have?

We value your feedback on what made you become a member, what would reward you for continuing to support our CSA and other ways we can show our appreciation for your support! The CSA and Farm are a family effort, and our members are an extended family, we want to make sure we show the same support that we receive!

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Baja Garlic braids: Last week on the marketplace, $2 off, $6.99 ea

 

Chard: on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Gold Nugget Cherry Tomatoes:

Peaches: on the marketplace

Cilantro: on the marketplace

Fava Beans: on the marketplace

Kale, Green Curly: on the marketplace

Collards: In your share and on the marketplace

Cucumber, marketmore and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Zucchini: on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

 

Stuffed Patty pan squash

  • 5-7 small-medium patty pan squash
  • water for to cover for boiling
  • 2 cups of pre-cooked brown rice

Stuffing

  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 cup of baby portabella mushrooms
  • 2 cups packed chopped rainbow chard (this is what I had on hand. Any cooking greens will work)
  • 1/2 cup chopped onions
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/2 cup shredded Swiss cheese
  • Seasonings: sage and thyme.
  • 1/2 cup part skim ricotta cheese

  1. Boil patty pan squash for 15 minutes. If rice is not already cooked, cook it in a separate pan while the squash is boiling.  Cook rice and boil squash at the same time and make the stuffing while those two are cooking.
  2. In the sauté’ pan, add the oil. Let it heat to medium. Add the mushrooms, onions, garlic, and rainbow chard. Add Seasoning of choice. Cook 5-7 minutes until done. If the pan gets too dry, add a little water to finish steaming the greens.
  3. Preheat oven to 400*
  4. Add the sautéed vegetables to mixing bowl. Add the ricotta. Add the rice. Stir to combine. Set aside.
  5. Remove the squash. Cut off the end AND stem so that they sit flat. Using a small paring knife, cut out a deep pocket.  Repeat with the rest of the squash. KEEP THE STUFF YOU CUT OUT. Chop and add it to the mixing bowl.
  6. Stuff each squash with the vegetable/cheese mixture.
  7. Bake 20 minutes.
  8. Remove and top with cheese. Return to oven for 3 minutes until cheese has melted. Serve immediately.

 

SMALL PEACHES AND SUGAR BISCUITS

breskve4_1

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE PASTRY:
4 eggs
12 dessert spoons of sugar
125 g butter
8 dessert spoons of oil
1 vanilla sugar (7-10g)
2 baking powders (7-10g each)
a little bit of rum and lemon
flour – as much as it takes to make a soft and almost sticky pastry

FOR THE FILLING:
200g ground walnuts
Crumbs (the one taken out of the “half peach” when making a hole for the filling)
125 g butter
200g sugar
A little rum, cocoa powder and desiccated coconut

HOW TO MAKE BRESKVICE & CUKERANCICI

Beat the eggs with sugar, then add butter, oil, vanilla and baking powder. Add some lemon juice and rum. Fold in flour and with your hands make soft and sticky dough. When the dough is just about manageable, cut off pieces and roll in a longish strip Kneading chunks of pastry into a long strip and cutting identical pieces off makes it just a little bit easier to do your next task, which is to make “half peaches” out of pastry; it’s very important that you make the “half peaches” of very similar size. Shape each piece between your palms into small balls and put them on a baking tray a couple of centimeters apart.

It’s very important to have two flat baking trays, as by the time you bake the first lot, you can also knead the second one. We used 2/3 of the dough for “Breskvice” and only the last third for “Cukerancici”. My late auntie used to do half-half, but she also always made double amount (by just doubling all the ingredients) and she usually spent two days preparing these sweets. For shaping “Cukerancici” you need to put a strip of dough in a horseshoe shape and then make a cut at each end separating the edges, as well as one small cut on the top, which resembles a branch.

Let the “half peach” pastries cool down and then with a sharp knife dig a hole in each of them saving the crumbs that you take out. Be very careful as the pastry is so fragile that the “half-peaches” can easily break under the pressure of your fingers on one side and the knife on the other.

When all halves have a pit resembling a hole, you can prepare the filling. Mix together ground walnuts, crumbs, slightly softened butter and sugar. At the end add some rum, cocoa powder (it’s up to you how dark you want the filling to be), and some desiccated coconut, again it can work without it, but I like the taste of coconut and tend to put in everything I can.

The next time-consuming task is to find half-peaches of approximately similar size that make a nice peach when put together. Fill the holes and make sure the filling overruns on the edges so that it can also ‘glue’ together the two halves, so as to make a biscuit that looks like a peach, and put them on a large tray. From this recipe we managed to make approx. 35 peaches.

Next step is to prepare the coloring – as the peaches need to be half red half yellow, like the real fruit. Auntie Marija used to dissolve the colour in wine, but we opted for water and we used the ordinary icing food colourings widely available in every supermarket. You need to soak each one in red colour on one side and yellow on the other and then return them to the tray. When you finish all the peaches start again from the beginning – this time roll them in caster sugar and arrange them on the tray as the colour and sugar need to dry for a while. If you roll them in sugar as soon as you soak them in colour, the sugar will melt, but if you give the colour enough time to settle, they will be just wet enough for the sugar to stick onto them. I soaked “Cukerancici” only in red colour and then in sugar.

 

This looks like a lot of work and it’s really not. If you have your pans, ingredients, oven pre-heated, it doesn’t take long to do this. While the squash and rice are cooking, make the stuffing. It took about 5 minutes to cut 5-7 squashes. And less than that to stuff them.  I cooked this on a weeknight during the most stressful week of the year (last week of school) and I had dinner on the table in about 40 minutes because I had to wash a pot first. 2 pots, a baking dish, a mixing bowl, and a cutting board/knife and less than 40 minutes. It was filling and delicious and I had plenty of stuffing left over to use for two more dishes later in the week!

 

COLCANNON WITH LEEKS AND KALE

YIELD: SERVES 4 – 6

INGREDIENTS:

3 – 4 medium sized russet potatoes, peeled and chopped into chunks
8 ounces red potatoes, peeled and chopped into chunks
10 ounces parsnips, peeled and sliced
2 bay leaves
5 tablespoons butter
1 leek, cleaned and chopped
4 ounces kale, chopped
1 – 1 1/2 cup whole milk
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste

DIRECTIONS:

In a stock pot or cast iron pot, add both potato types, parsnips, and bay leaves. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a slow boil or simmer and cook for 20 – 30 minutes, or until the potatoes and parsnips are tender enough to be mashed.

Once potatoes and parsnips are tender, drain the water and discard the bay leaves. Press potatoes through a potato ricer. Set aside in a large mixing bowl.

Melt 1 tablespoon of butter in the stock pot or cast iron pot used to boil the potatoes. Sauté the leek over medium heat until tender, about 3 – 5 minutes. Add the kale and sauté for 2 – 4 minutes, or until tender. Melt the remaining butter and stir in the milk, salt, and pepper. Cook over medium until heated.

Then, pour over the mashed potato mixture and stir until combined. Taste for seasonings and add additional salt and pepper if desired.

 

STUFFED PATTYPAN SQUASH

cheese-basil-corn-kale-squash

 

PREP TIME

15 mins

COOK TIME

45 mins

TOTAL TIME

1 hour

 

Have a close encounter of the veggie kind! These saucer-shaped goodies are cheesy, garlicky and full of veg, with a fun shape that kids will love, too!

Author: Rachel Hanawalt

Serves: 6

INGREDIENTS

  • 6 patty pan squash, approximately 3 inches in diameter
  • 2 C roughly chopped kale
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • ⅓ C low-sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • 2 C corn, fresh or frozen
  • ½ C diced white onion
  • 1 Tbsp minced garlic
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ⅛ tsp black pepper
  • 1 C grated Cotija cheese plus more for garnishing
  • ¼ C chiffonade basil
  • cooking spray

Order Ingredients

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat your oven to 350º F. Chop the kale and place it in a pan with the olive oil and vegetable broth and cook over medium-high heat until all of the liquid is absorbed (about 8 minutes). Once cooked, set aside.
  2. While the kale is cooking, prep the patty pan squash by cutting the stems off the top and the bottom, removing as little of the flesh of the squash as possible. Then scoop out the seedy center of each squash, leaving a “cup” to place you’re stuffing into.
  3. To prepare your stuffing, mix together your kale, corn, white onion, garlic, salt, pepper and 1 C of cotija cheese in a bowl.
  4. Lightly grease a large casserole dish with olive oil or cooking spray and evenly place your patty pan in the dish, cup side up. To stuff the patty pan squash, squeeze together a ball of stuffing in your hands (as if you are making a snowball), and place it into one patty pan cup. The balls will be approximately the size of a medium ice cream scoop. Continue doing this until all of the patty pans are filled.
  5. Bake at 350º F for 35-45 minutes. Cooking for a shorter amount of time will yield a firmer squash and cooking for 45 minutes with result in a softer squash.
  6. Once cooked, remove the patty pans from the oven and sprinkle them with cotija cheese and chiffonade basil.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: July 28th, 2016

Climatology 2016:  Occasional showers and clouds.  No deep and dependable monsoon moisture.  We are halfway through the monsoon season and do not have much to show for it.

From the Wild:  All of the creatures of the land are holding on in hopes of cooling and rain.  The most active group are the scavengers:  turkey buzzards, ravens and crows, and coyotes are all having an easy time these days.

Cow stories:  The 6 heifers born last fall and early winter have been moved to Scott and Julie’s at La Puebla.  They are happily gorging on grass.  In a week or so we will check and see if it looks like another group could be added:  perhaps the older cows who have not calved could spend a month up there and get the grass into shape

Pinky just kept getting bigger and bigger until we thought she would bust and finally had her herself a healthy, rather large bull calf.  He is settling down to the job of nursing off his momma’s abundance.

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The rest of the herd is scattered across about 500 acres.  The herd spreads out only as much as it has to in order to find grass. There is grass on these pastures, but not everywhere.  Many places are scorched and waiting for rain.  Others with some shade and cooler (north) slopes are still green.

The cows can now be as much as 2 miles from their water supply.  they come back in small groups:  just a few at a time, or on up to a dozen or so. They drink a lot and then disappear again sometimes for over a day at a time.

Rain would be welcome…  Another week or maybe a bit more, until we can move up to Glorieta Freedom Ranch.

Beneficial birds   the baby chicks are settling in and doing very well.  10 weeks or so from now chickens should be back on the marketplace.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

Beneficial Farm CSA

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of July 21st, 2016

Check out the Webstore:

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday July 21st, 2016

Zucchini from Mesa Top Farm

Purple Daikon Radishes from Jubilee Farm

Green Onions, White/Red Mix from Jubilee Farm

Golden Nugget Cherry Tomatoes from Owl Peak Farm

Collards from Synergia Ranch

Cucumbers from Owl Peak Farm

Carrots from Chispas Farm

 

 

Freshly Peeled Garlic

Our friends at the Coop distribution center brought a new member to their team a few months back, Benjamin Bartley who formerly ran the Arcadia mobile market in DC. His role is a Value Chain Specialist, working on addressing a variety of food chain gaps. One of my best correlations to explain his work, is to compare it to how large companies found 1,000+ uses for corn, but in a more positive light. We often have a surplus of something, be it garlic, kale, zucchini, or there are B grade / “ugly” foods, that need to serve a purpose. Benjamin is tackling these issues one at a time, garlic just happened to be first on the list. Our members know Allicins Ranch, the other Ben who drive across the country in the garlic bus. Just to confuse you, Ben bought Ben’s excess garlic harvest this season that needed a use, and worked to establish the partners to peel and package it in ABQ. Benjamin has now taken a crop that has a limited shelf life and more was produced than the current market demanded, and found a new purpose for it. Not all of our members are big garlic eaters, but for those that use a bunch like me, there is some benefit to getting it peeled. We like looking at the big picture, finding areas that need improving and supporting the efforts to improve it. I will rant about food waste in the future, the efforts to change kitchen waste are getting some good publicity!

Anyway, the long and short, we know have peeled garlic on the marketplace and look forward to supporting more efforts to rethink the food system.

 

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New Cheese Producer

A few weeks ago, I chanced to meet Paul Owens, who along with his wife create Coonridge Org Goat Cheese. I was picking up some of our Coho salmon at the time, and after chatting about our products for a while, we agreed to trade cheese for fish, so their interns could have a few lovely meals and we could introduce the cheese to our members. Coonridge is certified Organic, producing a variety of great goat cheese they sell through various outlets. We have 6 of their top picks, available on the marketplace, to see what our members think of them. These are larger jars of goat cheese than we normally get from others, 7.5oz, about double the size of Old Windmill’s. We have them for sale at $13, $2 off regular price, to introduce them and get your input.  We look forward to your feedback!

http://www.coonridge.com/index.php/our-cheeses

96224e20-d7e8-4862-8030-73db3ecfe0a2_zpsidiz7tyb1

 

 

Member Reminder:

We love recycling!

We rely on members returning a reusable bag to their pick up site every week when they pick up their shares! We also reuse egg cartons as long as they are clean.

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares, which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Chard: on the marketplace

Daikon Radishes: on the marketplace

Cilantro: on the marketplace

Fava Beans: on the marketplace

Kale: on the marketplace

Collards: In your share and on the marketplace

Cucumber, marketmore and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Patty Pan, Zucchini: on the marketplace

Beets on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Baja Garlic, heads and braids: on the marketplace

Red Chili: on the marketplace

Tomatoes, Grape and: On the marketplace

 

Grilled Zucchini Steaks

  • 2 large zucchini
  • 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoon of Soy Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Balsamic Vinegar

* This recipe is a serving for 4,

Make sure you have washed your zucchini. Then with a knife cut both ends off. Cut 4 pieces, about ½ inch thick slices of zucchini lengthwise. Be very careful.

Mix EVOO, soy sauce and balsamic vinegar together. Once you have cut your zucchini into what I like to call “steaks” lay them out flat and pour the olive oil mixture generously over them. Turn the zucchini steaks over and repeat with the olive oil and seasoning.

Now that both side should be seasoned, take the zucchini steaks over to a hot outdoor grill or a grill pan. You will need to preheat your grills so they become nice and hot! Place all the zucchini steaks on the grill and let cook for 1-2 minutes on each side. Turn and cook for 1-2 minutes on the other side. Salt and pepper to taste. Take the now grilled zucchini steaks off and serve with a meal! You can also sprinkle some cheese on top!

 

Turkey and Zucchini Burgers with Green Onion and Cumin

INGREDIENTS

for the burgers

  • 1 lb. ground turkey
  • 1 large or 2 medium zucchinis, grated (2 cups grated)
  • 3 green onions, sliced
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp fresh ground pepper
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • oil for browning

for the Sumac Sauce

  • 2/3 cup yogurt
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1 small clove garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp sumac
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp fresh ground pepper

INSTRUCTIONS

 

  1. Set oven to 425F
  2. Make the sumac sauce by combining all the ingredients in a bowl and mixing well. Refrigerate until needed. Thin with a little water if you like a thinner sauce.
  3. Put all the burger ingredients, except the oil, in a large bowl Mix well, using your hands, making sure to get all the ingredients well incorporated, but don’t over-work the meat…use a light touch!
  4. Form the meat mixture into patties. I used a 1/3 cup as a measure, and made about 9 burgers. (You can make your burgers as large or small as you like, but will need to adjust the cooking time.) Note that the mixture will be very wet. Don’t worry, they will firm up as they cook.
  5. Coat the bottom of a skillet lightly with oil and heat until it is nice and hot. You should hear a good sizzle when the patties hit the pan, if not, let the oil heat more. Working in batches, brown the patties on both sides, for about 2 minutes per side, and add more oil as needed.
  6. Set the burgers on a parchment lined baking sheet and bake for about 7 to 10 minutes, just until done inside.
  7. Serve the burgers with the sauce.

 

Raw Rainbow Collard Greens Wrap Recipe

collard-wraps_ps_2b

 

Ingredients

4 large collard leaves
3/4 cup hummus
1 tomato, sliced into thin wedges
1 medium carrot, cut in half and sliced into thin strips
1 yellow bell pepper, sliced into thin strips
2 Persian cucumbers, sliced into thin strips
1/2 cup pea sprouts
1/4 red onion, sliced into thin strips
1/8 head of red cabbage, shredded
1/2 teaspoon grated horseradish in beet juice

 

Preparation

  1. Put raw collard leaves in a plastic bag and freeze them until they turn bright green, about an hour. This makes them more pliable without losing any raw nutrition.
  2. Run the leaves briefly under cold water and lay them topside down on a cutting board. Using a paring knife, gently shave down the raised part of the spines so the surface of the collard is nice and flat. Spread 3 tablespoons of hummus down the center of each leaf and distribute the rest of the vegetables evenly among the leaves, laying them parallel to the spines. Be sure to leave about an inch on each edge uncovered. Sprinkle horseradish on top.
  3. Roll the collard tops and bottoms (stem side) inward, fold one of the long sides in, tucking all the filling underneath it, and continue rolling the leaf from that side to the other side to get a tight wrap. Slice in half with a sharp knife.

 

Hungarian Cucumber Salad

830535

Ingredients

  • 2 large seedless English cucumbers, sliced thin
  • 1 extra large onion, sliced thin
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh dill
  • 3 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper, or to taste

Directions

  1. Lightly toss cucumber slices, onion slices, and chopped dill together in a large bowl.
  2. Pour vinegar over cucumber mixture; toss to coat.
  3. Pour oil over cucumber mixture; toss to coat.
  4. Season with salt and black pepper.

 

From the Mesa Top: July 21th, 2016

Climatology 2016:  Over the weekend the atmospheric moisture level began to increase.  Finally, the stagnant weather pattern has begun to shift, some clouds in the afternoon and evening, scattered storms.  And storm coverage increasing.  Finally, on Monday afternoon and evening the storms reached Mesa Top.

Now we have to hope that the pattern of a typical monsoon is established.  Late starting monsoon is better than no monsoon.

From the Wild:  The extended dry spell has pushed many creatures and species to great lengths to get water, and resulted in plenty of casualties.  Squirrels, mice, and even a bat were found drowned, trying to get to water in hazardous ways.

Cow stories:  The 6 heifers born last fall and early winter are separated and ready to go to Scott and Julie’s at La Puebla.

Another of our foundation herd momma Ayrshires looks ready to calf. For Pinky, born in 2008, this will be her fifth calf.  Brown, Abigail, Nancy, Bow, and One are older cows that are still due to calf this summer or early fall.  A couple of heifers may calf as well.

There is some chaos among the herd as changes occur.  One cause is the extensive amount of movement it has taken just to keep them on decent grass.

Particularly the heifers who calved late last fall have become quite an extended family.  Each cow feels responsible for ALL of the calves in their family.  The heifers have to go now, off of the mommas, or we risk a repeat of last year’s failed experiment in which the heifers get bred to young.  We are happy to let the mommas raise the bull calves longer.  But the heifers have to be separates

The herd is making one last stop at Herrera Ranch, as we work to finish up the fencing at Glorieta Freedom Ranch up on the edge of the mesa.

We had a little mid-summer “crisis”, where the family decided that if they couldn’t be on the beach in CA, they would make one. Mom and the gals made a little patio beach in front of the house, with mini pool, to break up the summer monotony. Well, the cows decided to join in, but mistook the pool for a watering hole!

Beneficial birds   This week baby chicks arrive who are being raised for meat.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of July 14th, 2016

Check out the Webstore:http://www.farmigo.com/store/beneficialfarm

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday July 14th, 2016

Chard from Synergia Ranch

Kale from Synergia Ranch

Beets from Owl Peak Farm

Org Strawberries from Preferred Produce

Quinoa Greens from White Mountain Farm

Fava Beans from White Mountain Farm

Cilantro from White Mountain Farm

Zucchini from Mesa Top Farm

 

Cooking-Class Guinea Pigs wanted!

We are looking into a partnership with a nutritionist who has developed a course of virtual cooking classes to help familiarize people with their veggies. I know most of us have gotten pretty good at cooking with all the unique vegetables our farms grow, but there is always room to improve our skills. We are looking for 2-3 people that would try out the first course for free, and tell us what they think. It would be great if we had someone new to cooking with greens, and someone very familiar with them try it out, so we can get some different prospective. We appreciate your time and input!

New Cheese Producer

A few weeks ago, I chanced to meet Paul Owens, who along with his wife create Coonridge Org Goat Cheese. I was picking up some of our Coho salmon at the time, and after chatting about our products for a while, we agreed to trade cheese for fish, so their interns could have a few lovely meals and we could introduce the cheese to our members. Coonridge is certified Organic, producing a variety of great goat cheese they sell through various outlets. We have 6 of their top picks, available on the marketplace, to see what our members think of them. These are larger jars of goat cheese than we normally get from others, 7.5oz, about double the size of Old Windmill’s. We have them for sale at $13, $2 off regular price, to introduce them and get your input.  We look forward to your feedback!

http://www.coonridge.com/index.php/our-cheeses

 96224e20-d7e8-4862-8030-73db3ecfe0a2_zpsidiz7tyb

 

Member Reminder:

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares,which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Chard: In your share and on the marketplace

Kale: In your share and on the marketplace

Collards: on the marketplace

Sugar Snap Peas: on the marketplace

Radishes: on the marketplace

Cucumber, marketmore and pickling: on the marketplace

Summer Squash: Patty Pan, Zucchini, Alexandria, Zephyr and Mexican Grey: on the marketplace

Beets on the marketplace

Sprouts: Sunflower and Buckwheat on the marketplace

Baja Garlic, heads and braids: on the marketplace

Tropea Onions: on the marketplace

Red Chili: on the marketplace

Tomatoes, Grape and: On the marketplace

QUINOA:  In your share and on the marketplace

 

Fava Beans with Rice and Yogurt

 fresh-green-fava-beans-2

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients:

1¼ cups long grain rice

4-5 tablespoons mild olive oil

Bunch of dill or mint, finely chopped

White pepper to taste

14 ounces shelled fava beans, fresh

2 cups plain whole milk yogurt

1 clove garlic, crushed

Salt

 

Pour the rice into plenty of boiling water. Boil hard for about 14 minutes, until it is almost but not entirely tender.

Drain and put back into the pan.

Stir in 3 tablespoons of the oil, the herbs, and salt and pepper to taste. Put the lid on and leave the pan on very low heat for the rice to steam for about 15 minutes, or until tender.

Boil the fava beans in lightly salted water for a few minutes, until tender, then drain. Stir gently into the rice with the remaining oil.

Serve hot or cold with the yogurt, beaten with crushed garlic and a little salt. Serve the yogurt separately or spoon it over the rice and favas.

 

Sautéed Quinoa Leaves with Garlic

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1 bunch quinoa leaves, trimmed of woody stems

2 cloves garlic, sliced thin
2 Tablespoons olive oil
2 Tablespoons water
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Heat a sauté pan on medium, add oil.  Swirl.  When hot, add garlic and fry till golden.  Add quinoa leaves and water then cover the pan.  Let steam for a few minutes until leaves are wilted.  Add salt to taste.

Cilantro Lime Grilled Chicken with Strawberry Salsa

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Prep Time: 20 minutes Marinate Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes Total Time: 1 hour Servings: 4

 

ingredients

FOR THE STRAWBERRY SALSA:

  • 1 pound strawberries, diced (~2 cups)
  • 1/4 cup red or green onion, finely diced or sliced
  • 1 jalapeno, finely diced
  • 1 lime, juice and zest
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped
  • salt to taste

FOR THE CILANTRO LIME GRILLED CHICKEN:

  • 1 pound boneless and skinless chicken breasts
  • 2 limes, juice and zest or 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, grated
  • 1 jalapeno, finely diced (optional)
  • salt and pepper to taste

directions

FOR THE STRAWBERRY SALSA:

  1. Mix everything and enjoy!

FOR THE CILANTRO LIME GRILLED CHICKEN:

  1. Marinate the chicken in the mixture of the lime juice and zest, oil, cilantro, garlic, jalapeno, salt and pepper for 30 minutes to overnight.
  2. Grill the chicken over medium-high heat until cooked, about 3-5 minutes per side.
  3. Serve topped with the strawberry salsa.

 

Cilantro Pesto over Zucchini Noodles

 cilantro-pesto-gi-365-4

Prep time

15 mins

Total time

15 mins

 

Serves: makes 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 2 bunches of cilantro, (4 ounces)
  • ½ cup cashews, lightly roasted
  • 2 avocados, peeled and pitted
  • 2 Tablespoons avocado oil or olive oil
  • 2 Teaspoons sea salt
  • 4 cloves of garlic minced, measuring 1 Tablespoon
  • 1 recipe of Zucchini Noodles
  • Freshly chopped tomatoes, about 3 cups

Instructions

  1. Coarsely chop the cilantro, leaving most of the stems behind.
  2. Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend on a low speed using the tamper to keep the mixture moving. It will take a couple of minutes before the pesto becomes fairly smooth.
  3. If you’re using a food processor: process all ingredients, scraping down the sides as necessary until the pesto is mostly smooth.
  4. Serve immediately as desired or with a recipe of Zucchini Noodles and freshly chopped tomatoes.

 

From the Mesa Top: July 14th, 2016

Climatology 2016:  Heat that spares nothing:  Wind along with, which is totally out of place in July.  Even as the wind dries out and sears the grasses and pastures, there is a cool feel in the shade.

How … Sad?  Pathetic?  Amusing?… that when the temp drops to the mid-80s as we approach sunset, that feels like relief.  The air is so dry that on still nights, the cooling is pronounced, not the low 50s at Mesa Top.  Of course the cities with the concrete heat sinks and exhaust of all types, and artificial humidity, the night time cooling is very slow to materialize.

The garden resembles a MASH unit for plants.  The miracle is that as long as enough water flows to them, the daytime stress gives way to night time relief and voila!  Zucchini are popping.  There are only a few hours a day when it is at all enjoyable or pleasant to work in the garden.

From the Wild:  The jackrabbits and cottontails are feeding along the roadsides, where the remaining green forage can be found, and there are a lot of funerals to be scheduled.  The ravens and crows and turkey buzzards are happy to clean up.

Cow stories:  The northern lease lasted a week, and now the cows are at headquarters for a day.  We have a group of calves to brand, and several bulls to send to the processing plant, and a small group of young heifers to move to La Puebla.

As always, moving day for the cows is a stressful thing.  About 56 cows of all ages and types, the first 32 were easy to find and gather and they walked quickly and efficiently down the neighbor road.  They joined a group of 10 who had been kept home.  Another group of 10 had gone to the farthest point on the northern lease and knocked down a fence to get to the next neighbor’s property.  9 of them made the next trip home.

Which left one young Momma cow, Hagerman one, and her calf, and Blanca’s calf belonging to unaccounted for.  They showed up for water, but scattered.  The only hope was to walk the Blanca all the way back, which took until dark.  Blanca’s had separated from his buddy and surrogate momma.  That pair greeted Blanca at sunset and stayed around waiting for sunrise and then the bunch of them set off and found that calf.  One more walk home meant that at last all present and accounted for.

The fencing at Glorieta Freedom ranch is getting close.  We had aimed for July one, and now have our fingers crossed for the 15th.  Even in the heat, 500 ft. higher elevation and a lot bigger pines and there is noticeable coolness, plus there is lots of grass.   If the cows only knew what is waiting for them in a few days, but meanwhile they have a lot to complain about.

No species except perhaps lizards and snakes truly flourish under the stress of serious heat.

Beneficial birds   The birds are up early and busy eating and drinking and then they settle in to shade wherever they can find it and then get busy again for the last couple or few hours before sunset.  More heat stress sufferers.

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

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Member message for Beneficial Farm, CSA for distribution of June 23rd, 2016

Check out the Webstore:

Here is what we are planning for your Beneficial CSA Share for Thursday June 23rd, 2016

Mini Cucumbers from Silver Leaf Farm

Garlic Scapes from Jubilee Farm

Collards from Synergia

Beets from Owl Farm

Org Yellow Onions from Seco Spice

Salad Turnips from Vida Verde

Snow Peas from Owl Farm

Cherry Tomatoes from Silver Leaf Farm

 

 

Munchies

I know we had grape tomatoes last week, we aren’t sending much out. We are getting an unknown amount of snow peas from Owl Farm that are going to be divided up, and we are using the grape tomatoes to balance out what we end up getting. These tomatoes are really juicy, grown in their hydroponic greenhouse, sweet little snack that will burst in your mouth.

We really happy to see the snow peas coming in! It’s not a big harvest, it was going to be marketplace only, but we want to spread out what we end up with. It might be a snack on your drive home, enough to add to a salad or maybe enough to be in a dish, just got to wait and see. The mini cukes are also really awesome snacks, we picked one off the vine my first time in the greenhouse and just munched on it while getting the tour, yummy!

Guinea pigs wanted! I am looking for a few people to try out a cooking class! I am looking at partnering up with a chef who has put together a web series on a variety of healthy cooking courses. They could make a nice component to the CSA, a “resident” chef of sort. What I am really thrilled with is that in exchange for our sharing her course, anyone that signs up will have 15% of their course fee coming back to us, so we can donate that to Food Depot in local produce! If the courses are enjoyed by members and we are seeing more local food going to our hungry, I think it’s a great partnership.

Finally, just a friendly reminder to members new and veterans, please wait until the member message gets sent out to place marketplace orders. Monday we find out what the produce for the week will be, but it’s not completely updated until this email. We don’t want you to take the time to order when it’s not updated yet, and miss out on what was added.

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Yakkety Yak

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cHB3Rbz1OI

Maybe this song isn’t the best way to represent a unique & juicy Yak burger, but isn’t it good to hear it again!?

We are now offering locally raised Yak, free-range, antibiotic free. David Franklin and Christa Coggins started out their dabbling in raising Yak when their neighbors asked them if their herd could graze on their land up in Mora county. After a few years, their neighbors decided they didn’t want to continue raising the animals, so David and Christa bought them from them, starting out with 13 head. Yak have acclimatized well to the high country of New Mexico and Colorado, and these animals rotate between through pastures throughout the area.

Most people who have never tried yak are concerned about the flavor profile: the classic question — “is it gamey?”. I personally love the taste of most game, although I think that question really means — “does it taste strong?”. I probably speak to more people who really like the flavor of yak since it is a fairly subtle difference from beef, but there is an identifiable flavor. I think some people who don’t really want to taste meat at all (consumers of factory chicken, grain-fed grocery store beef) might not be the ideal yak consumer, but people who do really enjoy different kinds of great meat and game typically love it. My own take on it is: “sweeter than bison, cook it like elk” David Franklin

It was found by the International Yak Association that yak meat is nutritionally very similar to grass-fed beef and bison. It is higher in moisture content, though, which is why it is so juicy. It is high in “good” fats, low in “bad” fats, and full of nutrients, so smaller portions often feel more satisfying compared to other meats.

http://www.iyak.org/yak-meat.html

http://cdn1.bigcommerce.com/server4800/rm0k/product_images/uploaded_images/pict003.jpg

 

Member Reminder:

Members who are new to the CSA, or have not replenished their Farmigo account before, please read this!

Member accounts are not set up to stop service once your account hits $0. Most member accounts are set up on an automatic billing system, or those that don’t have this set up, pay in some regular instilment. Member accounts will receive an email notice if their account is falling below $50, regardless of if their payment is automatic or not.

Members wishing to stop their share when their balance hits zero, NEED to email us to suspend their shares! We don’t make a habit of regulating balances week to week, and don’t mind letting a family bounce a week’s worth of food to keep them feed, so we don’t stop shares when your balance hits zeros unless we know your leaving the CSA. In order to have our flexible system, where a family can wait a week to reinvest in a share, we need members to let us know when they are closing our accounts, or taking a vacation. Otherwise, we spend even more money in paying for unclaimed shares,which aren’t able to be donated by the time a member lets us know they are canceling some times.

 

Member, please email you holds and Substitutions in a separate email to us, so it is not lost in a hidden chain!!

Shares@Beneficialfarm.com

CSA Phone: 505-470-1969

 

Substitutions:

*We are getting better at making changes to member’s share when their dietary preferences that you let us know about. If you see something in the share that you can’t have, or absolutely hate, send us an email and we can find a substitute, but remember that half the fun of the CSA is trying something new.

News and specials on the marketplace:

We are starting to get into our Summer crops, which will make having an accurate marketplace and regular share list more reliable. Occasionally, a product comes in that isn’t up to our standards for distribution, or is shorted by the farm, so contact us via email for credits/issues.

 

Chard: on the marketplace

Red Russian Kale: on the marketplace

Prosciutto is back, and we added Absinthe Green Chili Salami to the marketplace

Pork Stew meat: On the marketplace

Tucumcari Green Chili Jack Cheese! On the marketplace

Baja Garlic, heads and braids: on the marketplace, heads in shares

Garlic Scapes: on the marketplace

Tropea Onions: on the marketplace

Wildflower Honey: on the marketplace

Red Chili: on the marketplace

Tomatoes, Grape and Vine Ripe:  On the marketplace

QUINOA:  In your share and on the marketplace


Garlic Scape Pancakes

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Ingredients

  • Pancakes:
  • 1 cup whole spelt flour (optional, use white flour if you prefer)
  • 1 1/2 cup unbleached white flour
  • 1/2 cup boiling water
  • 1/2 cup cold water
  • 1/2 tbsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 cup toasted sesame seed oil
  • 2 cups finely chopped garlic scapes
  • Dipping Sauce:
  • 3 tbsp. organic soy or tamari sauce
  • 3 tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 1 to 2 tsp. freshly grated ginger
  • 1 tsp. sesame oil
  • 1 tsp. sugar or honey
  • A pinch of dried chili flakes (optional)
  • For frying:
  • About 1/4 cup grapeseed or peanut oil

Directions

  1. Mix the spelt and white flours together with the salt. Put half of the mixture in one bowl and half in another bowl.
  2. In one bowl add 1/2 cup boiling water. Mix with a wooden spoon until the dough can handled. Knead for 2 minutes in the bowl.
  3. In the other bowl, mix the baking powder into the flour. Add the cold water and mix with a wooden spoon until dough can be handled. Knead for 2 minutes in the bowl.
  4. Incorporate both dough together by kneading them into one another for 5 minutes on a lightly floured surface. This dough is very forgiving. If its too dry, simply add a bit of water. If it’s too sticky, simply add a bit of flour. The dough should feel nice and moist but not stick to your hands.
  5. Shape into a ball, and place in a bowl with a damp towel on top and let it rest at room temperature for 1 to 2 hours.
  6. Cut the dough into 4 pieces.
  7. Roll each one into a thin 9 or 10 inch circle.
  8. Brush with one tablespoon of sesame oil and sprinkle with about 1/2 cup of garlic scapes, evenly distributed over the surface.
  9. Roll the dough into a tight cylinder and pinch in the edges to seal. Coil this cylinder into a spiral and tuck in the end. Flatten it into a disc with the palm of your hand. Roll this out into a flat pancake, about 1/4 inch thick. Repeat with the remaining pieces of dough. Let the 4 pancakes rest for about 10 minutes before frying.
  10. Meanwhile, make the dipping sauce by whisking all ingredients together.
  11. Heat about 1 tablespoon of oil in a heavy skillet on medium heat. When the oil is hot, gently place the pancake into the pan and cook on each side for about 2 to 3 minutes or until nice and golden. Repeat with remaining pancakes. Cut the pancakes into wedges and serve hot, with the dipping sauce.

Tips/Techniques

If you wish to keep your pancakes warm, place them on a baking sheet in a 200 F oven. However, they are best when served straight off the skillet.

 

Garlic Scapes and Basil Pesto

garlic-scape-pesto-recipe

Ingredients:

  • 10 to 12 large garlic scapes, with bulb removed, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 cup (lightly packed) clean, dry basil leaves
  • 1/4 to 1/2 tsp. sea salt/Himalayan salt
  • 1/2 to 1 cup (or more depending on how thick you want your pesto) good quality olive oil
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts or hemp seeds (I use hemp seeds)
  • 1/2 to 1 cup grated organic Parmesan cheese (This is optional. I personally don’t add the cheese.)

Preparation:

Add garlic scapes, basil, and salt to the large bowl of a food processor. Start processing, adding oil slowly. Stop processing and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula.

Once a smooth paste has been achieved, add parmesan (optional) and process until completely mixed in.

Top processing and add the nuts or seeds. Pulse processor until nuts/seeds are roughly chopped and fully mixed in. This gives the pesto a great texture.

Enjoy!

 

TERIYAKI TOFU & BEET COLLARD WRAPS

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WHAT YOU’LL NEED

Miso Dipping Sauce:

2 tablespoons white miso paste

2 tablespoons coconut milk

2 teaspoons honey

2 teaspoons fresh ginger, peeled and grated

 

Teriyaki Tofu:

1 pound extra firm tofu, drained and pressed

2 tablespoons coconut oil or olive oil

1/4 cup teriyaki sauce

 

Collard Wraps:

6 large collard leaves

2 ounces alfalfa sprouts

2 cups red cabbage, thinly sliced

1/2 large cucumber, peeled and thinly sliced

8-ounce Beets, sliced

WHAT TO DO

  1. Prepare miso dipping sauce by whisking all of the ingredients in a small bowl. Set aside until ready to use.
  2. Press tofu to drain of excess liquid by placing a folded paper towel on top of the whole cube, and weighing down a cast iron pan on top. This should be done over a cutting board, plate, or surface that you don’t mind getting wet. Leave to press for 20 minutes, then slice into 3/4 inch slices.
  3. Heat the oil and teriyaki sauce in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Place the tofu slices on the hot skillet and allow them to cook until crispy and caramelized, about 3 minutes. Carefully flip to the other side and cook for an additional 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a plate and set aside until ready to use.
  4. Cut the stem off the collard leaves and shave the stem so that it’s flush with the leaf.
  5. Add desired amount of sliced red cabbage, alfalfa sprouts, cucumber, sliced beets, and tofu to the flattened leaf, then roll like a burrito.
  6. Serve with miso dipping sauce.

 

GRILLED CHEESE WITH BEETS AND BASIL AOILI

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WHAT YOU’LL NEED

Basil Aioli:
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, finely chopped
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 small clove garlic, minced
A pinch of sea salt

Sandwiches:
8 thick slices of bread
4 ounces of goat chèvre
8-ounce Cooked Beets, sliced into 1/4 inch thick rounds
2 handfuls watercress (or microgreens of choice!)

 

WHAT TO DO

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Whisk together the ingredients for the basil aioli in a small bowl and refrigerate until ready to use.
  3. Place the slices of bread on a baking sheet and bake until golden brown (about 2-3 minutes).
  4. Flip the bread and spread the goat chèvre over each piece. Compile 4 grilled cheeses by adding desired amount of sliced beets and watercress to a slice of bread and topping it with another slice of bread.
  5. Place the sandwiches back in the oven until warmed through (about 3 minutes).
  6. Remove sandwiches from oven and place on plates. Carefully lift the top slice off of each sandwich and drizzle basil aioli inside. Replace top slice and cut the sandwiches in half to serve.

 

 

From the Mesa Top: June 23rd, 2016

Climatology 2016:  Record heat, historically high for the northwest part of the state (oh, well, remember 6 months ago, the historic blizzard in the south eat?).  That means higher than ever recorded.  EVER!

This week the moisture is supposed to be drawn in under the big dome of high pressure and by late week monsoonal pattern should emerge:  A still/stationary warm air mass, no wind and enough moisture in place for daily storms to fire off the mountains.

From the Wild:  Rattlesnakes on the move:  one dog got bitten, swollen up but recovering nicely.  Also a sighting of what may be the biggest rattle snake to appear at mesa top.  Deer on the move, looking for water.

mt062016_zpsgx11sxp8

Cones are forming on the pinon:  looking ahead there may be pinon nuts again this fall

The gamble oaks on the west facing ridges have fully leafed out.  Many show as much as 6 to 8 inches of new growth, which seems prolific considering that moisture has been moderate last winter and this spring.

Cow stories:  At least 3  more calfs are “hoofs on the ground”. There may be another pair of twins, hard to tell until the herd is moved and everyone is gathered and counted.

The routine seems to be that the herd congregates around the water at high noon.  They are all fully fed from the morning’s grazing and so are ready for water.  Then they sit around in the shade chewing their cuds and wander off to prepare for an afternoon of more grazing.

Psycho momma is back with the heifer herd and she seems to be calming down at last.

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We may move the herd back to the northern state lease, which has good forage on it because we rotated the cows off just in time for the nice rounds of rain in early May.  It is amazing how much additional forage can be produced by getting rest to the pastures at the right time, even with only modest rains.

Fence work continues at the Holians’ Glorieta Freedom ranch. Hopefully we can move the cows to the cooler, higher country soon

Beneficial birds   With the days getting hot, the most important change for the chickens is to open up the ventilating walls and get some natural air flow through the

Our farms and farmers thank you for your support,

The Warshawer/Swendson/Agard Family

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